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Muzak

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Anonymous
April 2, 2005 11:36:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I used to work at a now defunct supermarket (Purity Supreme) back in
the 1980's. They used to play "muzak" over the PA system (orchestra
music which often featured instrumental versions of popular rock
songs). There was an instrumental version of "Walking in Rhythm" by the
Blackbyrds. Does anyone know who did the instrumental version of that
song? I'd love to get a copy of it. Sorry if this is off topic for this
newsgroup, but I couldn't find any other groups where this would be
relevant.
Bryan
Totalrod2 @ aol.com

More about : muzak

Anonymous
April 2, 2005 11:51:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Yeah, Muzak did it. Muzak played only their own arrangements of songs
that were recorded by studio musicians. "Music the art, Muzak the
science".


There are some bootlegs floating around but Muzak does not sell or
distribute its product for sale. You can tape it off a SCA channel if
you are dedicated.
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 12:22:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I figured the song was done by someone in particular. I have quite abit
of this type of music in my collection and here's a few examples of the
"muzak" I'm speaking of:
**Light my Fire (Woody Herman)
**Magical Mystery Tour (The Hollyridge Strings)
**Aqualung (The London Symphony)
**California Dreamin' (Mystic Moods Orchestra)
**Sunshine of Your Love (Gerald Wilson & his Orchestra)
**Last Train to Clarksville (Goldengate Strings)
**My Sweet Lord (Nelson Riddle)
**Summer in the City (Buddy Morrow)
**Green Tamborine (Terry Baxter & his Orchestra)
**A Horse With No Name (The Longines Symphonette Society)
Is there an artist or orchestra in particular who does "Walking in
Rhythm"?
Bryan Lord
Totalrod2 @ aol.com
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 11:35:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Totalrod2@aol.com wrote:
> I figured the song was done by someone in particular. I have quite
abit
> of this type of music in my collection and here's a few examples of
the
> "muzak" I'm speaking of:
> **Light my Fire (Woody Herman)
> **Magical Mystery Tour (The Hollyridge Strings)
> **Aqualung (The London Symphony)
> **California Dreamin' (Mystic Moods Orchestra)
> **Sunshine of Your Love (Gerald Wilson & his Orchestra)
> **Last Train to Clarksville (Goldengate Strings)
> **My Sweet Lord (Nelson Riddle)
> **Summer in the City (Buddy Morrow)
> **Green Tamborine (Terry Baxter & his Orchestra)
> **A Horse With No Name (The Longines Symphonette Society)
> Is there an artist or orchestra in particular who does "Walking in
> Rhythm"?
> Bryan Lord
> Totalrod2 @ aol.com



Muzak produced, and recorded all their own music.
There might be a James Last version of the song you are looking for,
he's recorded almost every song ever written, and puts out a new Album/
CD every 11 days.
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 3:47:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1112499383.690202.226850@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com> Totalrod2@aol.com writes:

> They used to play "muzak" over the PA system (orchestra
> music which often featured instrumental versions of popular rock
> songs). There was an instrumental version of "Walking in Rhythm" by the
> Blackbyrds. Does anyone know who did the instrumental version

Almost certainly a Muzak group or an anonymous contractor. Everything
they use is material that they produce themselves or have produced for
hire. Even if you do find out how played it, you'll never get a copy
unless you get in your time machine, go back to the right time period,
wait in the market with a recorder handy, and catch it on the fly.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 6:01:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

They distributed their processed music-like product on tape, recorded
at an especially slow speed, at one time and the tapes went back for
erase and reuse or destruction at some point. They also distributed it
via subcarrier on FM and maybe in some market still do. Either way a
few nutty eccentrics intercepted the PMLP and retained it for their
use. Many "ambient" musicians such as Brian Eno are known to possess
some quantity of Muzak PMLP and to have studied it att length.

A few "secret" LPs were made also for demo and inhouse training
purposes. More than one has escaped.

If you have a time machine and Muzak is your first concern of
interception, you are one sorry dude. It's like a '62 Reissue Strat in
Seafoam Green...
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 4:53:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<Totalrod2@aol.com> wrote:
>I figured the song was done by someone in particular. I have quite abit
>of this type of music in my collection and here's a few examples of the
>"muzak" I'm speaking of:
>**Light my Fire (Woody Herman)
>**Magical Mystery Tour (The Hollyridge Strings)
>**Aqualung (The London Symphony)
>**California Dreamin' (Mystic Moods Orchestra)
>**Sunshine of Your Love (Gerald Wilson & his Orchestra)
>**Last Train to Clarksville (Goldengate Strings)
>**My Sweet Lord (Nelson Riddle)
>**Summer in the City (Buddy Morrow)
>**Green Tamborine (Terry Baxter & his Orchestra)
>**A Horse With No Name (The Longines Symphonette Society)

NONE of these are Muzak. Muzak is a company that does piped-in music,
and ALL of their arrangements are specific to them.

What you are referring to is "Easy-Listening Music" on commercially-released
records.

But, if you heard it over a supermarket PA system, there is a good chance
that it is either from Muzak or from 3M, both of which provide piped-in
music services for businesses, and both of which have their own performers
and arrangers so they don't have to pay royalties to anyone other than the
composer.

>Is there an artist or orchestra in particular who does "Walking in
>Rhythm"?

If it was a commercial release, it may be on allmusic.com. But if it was
on a Muzak or 3M system, it will not be available for commercial release.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 5:55:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

|There was an instrumental version of "Walking in Rhythm" by the
|Blackbyrds. Does anyone know who did the instrumental version of that

Contact the muzak company.

|song? I'd love to get a copy of it. Sorry if this is off topic for this
|newsgroup, but I couldn't find any other groups where this would be
|relevant.

One Muzak selection that has been deemed the holy grail of
Muzak is a the Ambroy Dukes "Journey to the Center of Your Mind."
Why so?
Ted Nugent hated Muzak so much that he tried to buy the Muzak
corporation.

FWIW: There's a copy of JTTCOYM floating around it's sounds like
a cat chasing a mouse! Flutes and violins very trippy.
April 5, 2005 11:08:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I worked at a Kroger store in rural West Virginia (the town of Madison,
30 miles south of Charleston in the coal fields) in the early 90s and
we had this extremely antiquated in-store music system. The store had
been built in the early 80's and the sound system involved this box
with about 10 large tapes in it. The tapes looked kinda like 8-track
tapes, only they were about 8" by 10" big (but flat, like an 8 track).
Anyhow, they weren't using the sound system when I got to this store,
so I took it upon myself to get it up and running so I could drive the
employees batty with the crummy music (I was the assistant manager, so
it was my job to drive them batty as it was their job to drive me
batty). It was about 3-4 notches below Muzak music in terms of
quality. Anyhoo....with this in mind, I suppose it's possible that if
you go back to the Purity Supreme store where you worked that all that
music could be on tape. Think about it....it's not likely that the
music was piped in via satellite like it is now. Of course, you did
mention that it is now defunct, but is the building still standing?

Good luck.

Mike
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 5:48:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 5 Apr 2005 01:55:43 -0000, Thrasher Remailer <thrasher@reece.net.au> wrote:
>|There was an instrumental version of "Walking in Rhythm" by the
>|Blackbyrds. Does anyone know who did the instrumental version of that
>
> Contact the muzak company.
>
>|song? I'd love to get a copy of it. Sorry if this is off topic for this
>|newsgroup, but I couldn't find any other groups where this would be
>|relevant.
>
> One Muzak selection that has been deemed the holy grail of
> Muzak is a the Ambroy Dukes "Journey to the Center of Your Mind."
> Why so?
> Ted Nugent hated Muzak so much that he tried to buy the Muzak
> corporation.
>

I started feeling old when I heard "C'mon Feel the Noise" on Muzak.
Anonymous
April 7, 2005 8:07:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The tempo of the music may have varied, but the speed of the tape was
extremely slow, to permit a long playing time. They were virtually
logging recorders.
November 7, 2008 10:15:00 PM

I recorded that stuff when I worked (for 8 years) at Muzak. I love music and tried my best to put Muzak into a new sphere. They had many, many constraints, mostly ****, but I endured and recorded some pretty good music (for that time). Walkin in Rhythm was one of them, and we probably recorded it with the late Syd Dale, who was a master of "cue" or "synchronization" music, which you people also don't know about but hear whenever you listen to the music on a commercial. I used to describe it as the invisible part of the iceberg (which, as you may know, is about 2/3 of the iceberg). And yes, I did record the Woody Herman band, which I loved and still do. One of the tunes was probably Light My Fire in an abridged version. I was trying to make music which I could stand and they could sell. I truly think I save Muzak...for not a big salary. So shoot me! I tried. Rod Baum
Anonymous
September 26, 2009 6:02:10 AM

Mike said:
Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I worked at a Kroger store in rural West Virginia (the town of Madison,
30 miles south of Charleston in the coal fields) in the early 90s and
we had this extremely antiquated in-store music system. The store had
been built in the early 80's and the sound system involved this box
with about 10 large tapes in it. The tapes looked kinda like 8-track
tapes, only they were about 8" by 10" big (but flat, like an 8 track).
Anyhow, they weren't using the sound system when I got to this store,
so I took it upon myself to get it up and running so I could drive the
employees batty with the crummy music (I was the assistant manager, so
it was my job to drive them batty as it was their job to drive me
batty). It was about 3-4 notches below Muzak music in terms of
quality. Anyhoo....with this in mind, I suppose it's possible that if
you go back to the Purity Supreme store where you worked that all that
music could be on tape. Think about it....it's not likely that the
music was piped in via satellite like it is now. Of course, you did
mention that it is now defunct, but is the building still standing?

Good luck.

Mike


Found this post while reminiscing about my first job in a Ace Hardware store outside Chicago in the mid 80s. ASCAP came in and busted the store for playing Lite FM off the radio. Gave the owner of the store a lawsuit threat, strongarmed a small fine, and gave a list of businesses supplying background music systems. I remember the owner saying he went with the cheapest one. I couldn't remember the name of the system but Googled a physical description after looking up Muzak, then in turn learning about AEI, 3M, Seeburg, et al. Looks like the system we saw in our respective stores was the 3M Cantata. Our system had only one tape tho.

As background music was a direct affront to my punk rock sensibilities at the time (age 16-18 in 1984-86), I took a "know thy enemy" approach, brought in my home cassette deck, and tapped into the store's PA amplifier. I don't remember exactly how I did the tapping, but it must not have been line level cuz the recording is extremely hot but is listenable if I drop my current deck's (Pioneer CT-F950) output. I have three cassettes worth of this stuff, couldn't nanny the recording as I had to be on the sales floor. And yeah, the music itself is even lamer than Muzak, lol.

Google also led me to a book, "Elevator Music - A Surreal History Of Muzak, Easy Listening, and Other Moodsong", by Joseph Lanza, University Of Michigan Press, 2004. Looks chock full of names, places, musicians/arrangers/engineers, etc. Think I'll pick it up.

Punk rock must be way behind me if I'm looking for books on easy listening/Muzak :p 

And I distinctly remember hearing a version of Zep's "Ten Years Gone" in a big mall near me in 1999 or so...
!