Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Convert MP3 from 16Kbs to 128/320 Kbs

Last response: in Home Audio
Share
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 4:39:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I have some old MP3 files which were recorded at 11 Khz @ 16 Kbs .
I want to burn this as Audio CD ,

As these were recorded at 11Khz @ 16Kbs, How would it help if I convert
these to 44.1 Khz @ 128 or 320 Kbs?

Also converting these MP3's increases the size from 80 kb to 1.5 Mb
April 5, 2005 8:20:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 4/5/2005 2:39 PM, smogul@gmail.com wrote:
> I have some old MP3 files which were recorded at 11 Khz @ 16 Kbs .
> I want to burn this as Audio CD ,
>
> As these were recorded at 11Khz @ 16Kbs, How would it help if I convert
> these to 44.1 Khz @ 128 or 320 Kbs?
>
> Also converting these MP3's increases the size from 80 kb to 1.5 Mb
>

Just convert them right to CD format as there is no point to convert
them to a higher mp3 bit rate as you won't gain anything (can't recover
lost bits). It is not going to sound very good on a good stereo though.
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 8:28:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1112729970.832561.176920@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
<smogul@gmail.com> wrote:
>I have some old MP3 files which were recorded at 11 Khz @ 16 Kbs .
>I want to burn this as Audio CD ,
>
>As these were recorded at 11Khz @ 16Kbs, How would it help if I convert
>these to 44.1 Khz @ 128 or 320 Kbs?

Well, you have to in order to make an audio CD. Because the audio CD
is by definition uncompressed 16 bits at 44.1 ksamp/sec, and anything
else won't play properly on a CD player. So it helps a lot.

>Also converting these MP3's increases the size from 80 kb to 1.5 Mb

Yes, that's what compression does. When you uncompress it, it gets a
lot larger. That's why people are willing to put up with the major
sound degradation of MP3 compression.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Related resources
Anonymous
April 6, 2005 1:46:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 5 Apr 2005 12:39:30 -0700, smogul@gmail.com wrote:

>I have some old MP3 files which were recorded at 11 Khz @ 16 Kbs .
>I want to burn this as Audio CD ,
>
>As these were recorded at 11Khz @ 16Kbs, How would it help if I convert
>these to 44.1 Khz @ 128 or 320 Kbs?

If your audio 'burning' program will burn from 128k mp3's but not
from your original 11kHz/16kbps version, then I suppose it would help.
But you may be better off going directly to .wav format from your low
bitrate files. Try it both ways, though it seems doubtful that there
would be much difference.
If you have Winamp (and if you don't, you can get it free online),
you can go through its options to get to the output plugin, and choose
disk writer, and select what subdirectory you want to hold the output
files. You then 'play' the mp3 and instead of playing, it writes a
..wav file that can be directly burned to CD with any burner program
I've ever heard of. Reset the output plugin so Winamp will again play
mp3's to the speakers.

>Also converting these MP3's increases the size from 80 kb to 1.5 Mb

Yes, just as Scott said. The totally uncompressed .wav files are
even bigger.

-----
http://mindspring.com/~benbradley
Anonymous
April 6, 2005 10:52:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks to all, The information provided was useful.
It makes sense to convert the files to PCM .wav format and burn to CD.
Anonymous
April 6, 2005 12:16:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 5 Apr 2005 16:28:26 -0400, Scott Dorsey wrote
(in article <d2usda$hpe$1@panix2.panix.com>):

> In article <1112729970.832561.176920@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> <smogul@gmail.com> wrote:
>> I have some old MP3 files which were recorded at 11 Khz @ 16 Kbs .
>> I want to burn this as Audio CD ,
>>
>> As these were recorded at 11Khz @ 16Kbs, How would it help if I convert
>> these to 44.1 Khz @ 128 or 320 Kbs?
>
> Well, you have to in order to make an audio CD. Because the audio CD
> is by definition uncompressed 16 bits at 44.1 ksamp/sec, and anything
> else won't play properly on a CD player. So it helps a lot.
>
>> Also converting these MP3's increases the size from 80 kb to 1.5 Mb
>
> Yes, that's what compression does. When you uncompress it, it gets a
> lot larger. That's why people are willing to put up with the major
> sound degradation of MP3 compression.


And, btw, there will be no improvement in quality. You're not really
uncompressing as much as you're upconverting. Whatever you lost during the
making of the mp3 will not be regained, but you will be able to listen on a
regular CD player.

Regards,

Ty Ford



-- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
stuff are at www.tyford.com
!