Post-Analog: What is the plan for Sprint?

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely large
foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on digital
roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will certainly
need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise there will be
too much of a gap on their service maps.

I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since that
is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of analog.

What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?

-mij
25 answers Last reply
More about post analog plan sprint
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    "Mij Adyaw" <mijadyaw@nospam.net> wrote in message
    news:qQxDe.377$bp.209@fed1read03...
    > After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    > Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely
    large
    > foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on
    digital
    > roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will certainly
    > need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise there will be
    > too much of a gap on their service maps.
    >
    > I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since
    that
    > is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of analog.
    >
    > What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?
    >
    > -mij

    You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless telcos
    have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.

    Bob
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Bob Smith wrote:

    > You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    > major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless telcos
    > have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.

    Regardless, if Sprint gives a rat's ass about their customers, they'll start
    inking more CDMA digital roaming agreements.

    Analog is completely insecure, and with the current administration in the
    White House wanting to give law enforcement the ability to do almost
    anything they want to without a warrant or probable cause, I don't want to
    use AMPS anymore. At all.

    Shifting completely to CDMA won't totally prevent "We're from the
    government, we're here to help" lackeys from being able to snoop on you, any
    more than even the fanciest, most expensive car alarm will keep the most
    determined professional burglars from stealing your car. What it WILL do is
    make it more expensive and more of a hassle for them or anyone else to
    eavesdrop on your cellular conversations.

    It's all about security and privacy.

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: sjsobol@JustThe.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Analog will go away as soon as the FCC allows cellular carriers to turn it
    off. I have heard that this will occur within the next several years. In
    this case, OnStar will also have problems since they use analog only service
    and probably get very good rates from the cell carriers for doing so.

    -mij


    "Bob Smith" <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:sbyDe.14455$aY6.7862@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    >
    > "Mij Adyaw" <mijadyaw@nospam.net> wrote in message
    > news:qQxDe.377$bp.209@fed1read03...
    >> After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    >> Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely
    > large
    >> foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on
    > digital
    >> roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will certainly
    >> need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise there will
    >> be
    >> too much of a gap on their service maps.
    >>
    >> I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since
    > that
    >> is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of analog.
    >>
    >> What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?
    >>
    >> -mij
    >
    > You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    > major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless
    > telcos
    > have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Yes, that is correct, however, CDMA, GSM, or any other digital transmission
    will prevent the geek kid that lives down the street from eavesdropping on
    your conversation with a modified police scanner. I never give out credit
    card numbers of any personal information on an analog connection for this
    reason. Note that this rule also applies to analog cordless telephones.

    -mij


    "Steve Sobol" <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote in message
    news:dbmcme$4ip$1@ratbert.glorb.com...
    > Bob Smith wrote:
    >
    >> You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    >> major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless
    >> telcos
    >> have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.
    >
    > Regardless, if Sprint gives a rat's ass about their customers, they'll
    > start inking more CDMA digital roaming agreements.
    >
    > Analog is completely insecure, and with the current administration in the
    > White House wanting to give law enforcement the ability to do almost
    > anything they want to without a warrant or probable cause, I don't want to
    > use AMPS anymore. At all.
    >
    > Shifting completely to CDMA won't totally prevent "We're from the
    > government, we're here to help" lackeys from being able to snoop on you,
    > any more than even the fanciest, most expensive car alarm will keep the
    > most determined professional burglars from stealing your car. What it WILL
    > do is make it more expensive and more of a hassle for them or anyone else
    > to eavesdrop on your cellular conversations.
    >
    > It's all about security and privacy.
    >
    > --
    > Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    > Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    > Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    > E: sjsobol@JustThe.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Mij Adyaw wrote:
    > Analog will go away as soon as the FCC allows cellular carriers to turn it
    > off. I have heard that this will occur within the next several years. In
    > this case, OnStar will also have problems since they use analog only service

    No longer true.

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: sjsobol@JustThe.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307
  6. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    "Steve Sobol" <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote in message
    news:dbmcme$4ip$1@ratbert.glorb.com...
    > Bob Smith wrote:
    >
    > > You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    > > major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless
    telcos
    > > have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.
    >
    > Regardless, if Sprint gives a rat's ass about their customers, they'll
    start
    > inking more CDMA digital roaming agreements.
    >
    > Analog is completely insecure, and with the current administration in the
    > White House wanting to give law enforcement the ability to do almost
    > anything they want to without a warrant or probable cause, I don't want to
    > use AMPS anymore. At all.
    >
    > Shifting completely to CDMA won't totally prevent "We're from the
    > government, we're here to help" lackeys from being able to snoop on you,
    any
    > more than even the fanciest, most expensive car alarm will keep the most
    > determined professional burglars from stealing your car. What it WILL do
    is
    > make it more expensive and more of a hassle for them or anyone else to
    > eavesdrop on your cellular conversations.
    >
    > It's all about security and privacy.

    Sure it is, and I'm sure that it's SPCS's intent to sign up with as many
    digital roaming partners as possible. In saying that, there are still areas
    in the boonies that no one has digital coverage.

    Bob
  7. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    On Wed, 20 Jul 2005 13:48:26 -0700, Steve Sobol <sjsobol@JustThe.net>
    wrote:

    >Bob Smith wrote:
    >
    >> You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    >> major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless telcos
    >> have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.
    >
    >Regardless, if Sprint gives a rat's ass about their customers, they'll start
    >inking more CDMA digital roaming agreements.
    >
    >Analog is completely insecure, and with the current administration in the
    >White House wanting to give law enforcement the ability to do almost
    >anything they want to without a warrant or probable cause, I don't want to
    >use AMPS anymore. At all.
    >
    >Shifting completely to CDMA won't totally prevent "We're from the
    >government, we're here to help" lackeys from being able to snoop on you, any
    >more than even the fanciest, most expensive car alarm will keep the most
    >determined professional burglars from stealing your car. What it WILL do is
    >make it more expensive and more of a hassle for them or anyone else to
    >eavesdrop on your cellular conversations.
    >
    >It's all about security and privacy.

    If you're talking about Government monitoring, then it makes
    absolutely no difference whatsoever whether the radio portion of the
    network is analog, digital, CDMA, TDMA, GSM, or any of the other
    standards because they have their taps located AFTER all of that, in
    the regular TCP/IP portion of the network. OTOH, if you meant any old
    Joe Blow being able to listen in, then yes, analog is less secure
    because anyone with a scanner that's able to receive those frequencies
    will be able to listen in. They're not supposed to, of course, but
    that's another story entirely.

    --
    Paul Miner
  8. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Paul Miner wrote:

    > If you're talking about Government monitoring, then it makes
    > absolutely no difference whatsoever whether the radio portion of the
    > network is analog, digital, CDMA, TDMA, GSM, or any of the other
    > standards because they have their taps located AFTER all of that, in
    > the regular TCP/IP portion of the network. OTOH, if you meant any old
    > Joe Blow being able to listen in, then yes, analog is less secure
    > because anyone with a scanner that's able to receive those frequencies
    > will be able to listen in. They're not supposed to, of course, but
    > that's another story entirely.

    As I mentioned, CDMA encryption is not a panacea. Plus, law enforcement can
    get a warrant and force the landline and cellular carriers to install a tap
    within the POTS or cellular network. But *legal* wiretaps aren't really my
    concern. My concern is with wiretaps where the government pulls a stunt like
    invoking the Patriot Act or something like that, where (legally) the wiretap
    is in a gray area and they're trying to pull my conversation off the airwaves.

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: sjsobol@JustThe.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307
  9. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Almost everywhere there is cellular there is both A and B analog
    carriers, and usually at least one of those is now also CDMA. Most
    Sprint PCS phone can roam CDMA cellular. However I am still of the
    opinion that most Sprint PCS customers do not need to roam.


    Mij Adyaw wrote:
    > After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    > Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely large
    > foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on digital
    > roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will certainly
    > need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise there will be
    > too much of a gap on their service maps.
    >
    > I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since that
    > is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of analog.
    >
    > What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?
    >
    > -mij
    >
    >
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Why are you of the opinion that most SprintPCS customers do not need to
    roam?


    "Jerome Zelinske" <jeromez1@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:CtEDe.6074$dU3.4450@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > Almost everywhere there is cellular there is both A and B analog carriers,
    > and usually at least one of those is now also CDMA. Most Sprint PCS phone
    > can roam CDMA cellular. However I am still of the opinion that most
    > Sprint PCS customers do not need to roam.
    >
    >
    > Mij Adyaw wrote:
    >> After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    >> Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely
    >> large foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on
    >> digital roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will
    >> certainly need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise
    >> there will be too much of a gap on their service maps.
    >>
    >> I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since
    >> that is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of
    >> analog.
    >>
    >> What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?
    >>
    >> -mij
    >>
    >>
    >>
  11. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Mij Adyaw wrote:
    > Why are you of the opinion that most SprintPCS customers do not need to
    > roam?

    If it was such a big deal for a large number of Sprint customers, Sprint
    would probably offer better roaming options. The "America" addon isn't a bad
    idea, but it can be restrictive for people who travel extensively and end up
    off Sprint's network often.


    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: sjsobol@JustThe.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307
  12. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    If you look at both Sprint PCS' and verizon's web site, you will see
    there are very, very, few areas where there is only analog. Almost all
    cellular carriers have overlaid their analog service with either CDMA or
    gsm.


    Bob Smith wrote:
    > "Mij Adyaw" <mijadyaw@nospam.net> wrote in message
    > news:qQxDe.377$bp.209@fed1read03...
    >
    >>After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    >>Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely
    >
    > large
    >
    >>foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on
    >
    > digital
    >
    >>roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will certainly
    >>need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise there will be
    >>too much of a gap on their service maps.
    >>
    >>I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since
    >
    > that
    >
    >>is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of analog.
    >>
    >>What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?
    >>
    >>-mij
    >
    >
    > You make it sound like analog is going away tomorrow. It still serves a
    > major service for those small markets where none of the big wireless telcos
    > have any service and analog will be here for quite some time.
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Jerome Zelinske wrote:
    > If you look at both Sprint PCS' and verizon's web site, you will see
    > there are very, very, few areas where there is only analog. Almost all
    > cellular carriers have overlaid their analog service with either CDMA or
    > gsm.

    If you look at Sprint's website, you won't see any analog. :D

    I believe Verizon has CDMA everywhere now and has for some time. They do
    additionally have AMPS in some of their legacy markets.


    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: sjsobol@JustThe.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307
  14. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Looking at Sprint PCS' web site for Wisc. will show some analog
    roaming, not a lot, even some no service areas. I have not really
    looked around for it, but I remember verizon had some analog areas in
    Oregon.


    Steve Sobol wrote:
    > Jerome Zelinske wrote:
    >
    >> If you look at both Sprint PCS' and verizon's web site, you will
    >> see there are very, very, few areas where there is only analog.
    >> Almost all cellular carriers have overlaid their analog service with
    >> either CDMA or gsm.
    >
    >
    > If you look at Sprint's website, you won't see any analog. :D
    >
    > I believe Verizon has CDMA everywhere now and has for some time. They do
    > additionally have AMPS in some of their legacy markets.
    >
    >
  15. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Jerome Zelinske wrote:
    > Looking at Sprint PCS' web site for Wisc. will show some analog
    > roaming, not a lot, even some no service areas. I have not really
    > looked around for it, but I remember verizon had some analog areas in
    > Oregon.

    When I said you won't see any analog, I meant you won't see any *native* analog.

    Most of that AMPS roaming *should* be CDMA by now. I don't know how much of
    it is.

    Regarding Oregon, Google for Dan Albrich's posts in alt.cellular.verizon.
    According to his experiences, Verizon's coverage in parts of Oregon is horrible.

    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: sjsobol@JustThe.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307
  16. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Mij Adyaw wrote:
    > After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    > Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely large
    > foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on digital
    > roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will certainly
    > need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise there will be
    > too much of a gap on their service maps.

    Your post-AMPS vision is erring on the side of chicken little.

    First off, the sunset date for AMPS doesn't REQUIRE everyone to turn of
    AMPS after the date has passed. It merely eliminates the requirement
    that current AMPS levels be maintained. If a carrier chooses to
    continue using AMPS, they are certainly allowed to do so.

    Second, if every AMPS switch just turns off, that doesn't mean coverage
    will just disappear. Cellular carriers would likely replace the
    coverage with some digital format, most likely a mix of CDMA and GSM (or
    UMTS).


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Steve Sobol wrote:

    > Analog is completely insecure, and with the current administration in
    > the White House wanting to give law enforcement the ability to do almost
    > anything they want to without a warrant or probable cause, I don't want
    > to use AMPS anymore. At all.

    Steve, if the government wants to eavesdrop on your phone conversations,
    they generally won't bother to do it over the air. It's much easier for
    them to get a warrant and have the cellular carrier's compliance office
    set up a tap for them at the MTSO, which pretty much circumvents any
    over the air interface, no matter how secure.


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  18. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    What is a "MTSO"? It is a new acronym for me.

    "Isaiah Beard" <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote in message
    news:11dvhtpihas4lba@corp.supernews.com...
    > Steve Sobol wrote:
    >
    >> Analog is completely insecure, and with the current administration in the
    >> White House wanting to give law enforcement the ability to do almost
    >> anything they want to without a warrant or probable cause, I don't want
    >> to use AMPS anymore. At all.
    >
    > Steve, if the government wants to eavesdrop on your phone conversations,
    > they generally won't bother to do it over the air. It's much easier for
    > them to get a warrant and have the cellular carrier's compliance office
    > set up a tap for them at the MTSO, which pretty much circumvents any over
    > the air interface, no matter how secure.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    > Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    It is my opinion, and we all have some, that since most of the large
    and medium carriers, not just Sprint PCS, will not sign up people who do
    not live in their covered area, and those areas are large enough that
    most of the customers will spend most of their time in it. There are
    some people, including me, that have not traveled beyond Sprint PCS
    coverage for years.

    Mij Adyaw wrote:
    > Why are you of the opinion that most SprintPCS customers do not need to
    > roam?
    >
    >
    > "Jerome Zelinske" <jeromez1@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    > news:CtEDe.6074$dU3.4450@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >
    >>Almost everywhere there is cellular there is both A and B analog carriers,
    >>and usually at least one of those is now also CDMA. Most Sprint PCS phone
    >>can roam CDMA cellular. However I am still of the opinion that most
    >>Sprint PCS customers do not need to roam.
    >>
    >>
    >>Mij Adyaw wrote:
    >>
    >>>After the final switch is turned-off for analog cellular in the United
    >>>Stated, what will happen to Sprint? Sprint does not have an extremely
    >>>large foot-print for native service and therefore it will need to rely on
    >>>digital roaming on Verizon and other Digital CDMA carriers. Sprint will
    >>>certainly need to negotiate good digital roaming agreements, otherwise
    >>>there will be too much of a gap on their service maps.
    >>>
    >>>I wonder if new phones in the future will offer both CDMA and GSM since
    >>>that is all that will be left in the United States after the demise of
    >>>analog.
    >>>
    >>>What do you all think? What will the future bring for Sprint?
    >>>
    >>>-mij
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >
    >
  20. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    I wonder what percentage of Sprint PCS customers have added the America
    option to their plans? What percentage of those that regularly use it?
    What is the percentage of roaming minutes, both under america options
    and paid per minute.

    Steve Sobol wrote:
    > Mij Adyaw wrote:
    >
    >> Why are you of the opinion that most SprintPCS customers do not need
    >> to roam?
    >
    >
    > If it was such a big deal for a large number of Sprint customers, Sprint
    > would probably offer better roaming options. The "America" addon isn't a
    > bad idea, but it can be restrictive for people who travel extensively
    > and end up off Sprint's network often.
    >
    >
  21. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    "Mij Adyaw" <mijadyaw@nospam.net> wrote in message
    news:UMPDe.2999$bp.626@fed1read03...
    > What is a "MTSO"? It is a new acronym for me.

    Mobile Telephone Switching Office

    Mij, I might recommend that you bookmark this following link, as it's pretty
    helpful in finding acronyms.
    http://www.acronymfinder.com/

    Bob
  22. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 16:16:25 GMT, "Bob Smith"
    <usirsclt_No_Spam_@earthlink.net> wrote:

    >
    >"Mij Adyaw" <mijadyaw@nospam.net> wrote in message
    >news:UMPDe.2999$bp.626@fed1read03...
    >> What is a "MTSO"? It is a new acronym for me.
    >
    > Mobile Telephone Switching Office
    >
    >Mij, I might recommend that you bookmark this following link, as it's pretty
    >helpful in finding acronyms.
    >http://www.acronymfinder.com/
    >
    >Bob

    That's a pretty good site. They even had a couple of entries for
    YGBSM, the motto of the Air Force Wild Weasels. Of course, the real
    motto is the impolite version, but close enough. :)

    --
    Paul Miner
  23. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    Again, delusions of grandeur. Nobody cares what you have to say on your
    phone unless you are a terrorist, then they should not only eavesdrop on
    your phone, but cut your throat as well.

    scannell
    cols oh


    "Steve Sobol" <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote in message
    news:dbmic7$5dd$1@ratbert.glorb.com...
    > Paul Miner wrote:

    >
    > As I mentioned, CDMA encryption is not a panacea. Plus, law enforcement
    > can get a warrant and force the landline and cellular carriers to install
    > a tap within the POTS or cellular network. But *legal* wiretaps aren't
    > really my concern. My concern is with wiretaps where the government pulls
    > a stunt like invoking the Patriot Act or something like that, where
    > (legally) the wiretap is in a gray area and they're trying to pull my
    > conversation off the airwaves.
    >
    > --
    > Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    > Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    > Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    > E: sjsobol@JustThe.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307
  24. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    scannell wrote:
    > Again, delusions of grandeur. Nobody cares what you have to say on your
    > phone unless you are a terrorist, then they should not only eavesdrop on
    > your phone, but cut your throat as well.

    It's not that I think I'm important, my friend. The government has gone way
    overboard in their desire to root out terrorists. They've made it quite
    clear that they want law enforcement to be able to do a lot of things
    without warrants that currently require them. This is no big secret.

    It's not that I think the FBI gives a damn about me personally. I'm pretty
    convinced they don't.


    --
    Steve Sobol, Professional Geek 888-480-4638 PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
    Company website: http://JustThe.net/
    Personal blog, resume, portfolio: http://SteveSobol.com/
    E: sjsobol@JustThe.net Snail: 22674 Motnocab Road, Apple Valley, CA 92307
  25. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

    > Jerome Zelinske wrote:
    > However I am still of the opinion that most Sprint PCS customers do not need to roam.
    >
    > and Mij Adyaw asked:
    >
    >> Why are you of the opinion that most SprintPCS customers do not need
    >> to roam?

    As I'm roaming 1/3 of the time on Verizon's analog (I assume its Verizon
    as my company Cingular phone was out of range and my buddy's Verizon
    phone still worked)...my initial knee-jerk reaction was "what did you
    base your opinion on that most Sprint users don't need to roam..."

    As i thought about it, in reality, VERY VERY few users ever need to roam
    *taken in the context that most usage is in principle cities.*

    Case in point, a trade magazine quoted a Cingular spokesman as saying x
    percentage of users (something like 95%)in Texas will be GSM by the end
    of some year. Since was referring to the number of minutes used, not
    number of cities or areas, his statement was misleading as 95% of the
    users would be in the Dallas & Ft. Worth, Houston, and San Antonio areas.

    To this end, a carrier could drop ALL service outside of the most
    profitable areas, and still make lot of money...actually more perhaps as
    thousands of little used tower sites could be retired.
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