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How "right" is the customer?

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Anonymous
April 14, 2005 2:21:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hello All,

Probably been discussed here before but...

The performers/customers came over and listened to their mixes and
really wanted the ambience jacked waaaay up. IMO, it sounds fine
through the monitors but really bad through the headphones but they
didn't care.

Burn the disk, hand it off, and move to the next job, right?

Andy

More about : customer

Anonymous
April 14, 2005 4:59:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<aengster@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1113499287.855947.12490@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Hello All,
>
> Probably been discussed here before but...
>
> The performers/customers came over and listened to their mixes and
> really wanted the ambience jacked waaaay up. IMO, it sounds fine
> through the monitors but really bad through the headphones but they
> didn't care.
>
> Burn the disk, hand it off, and move to the next job, right?
>
Burn a disk *first* then jack it up the way they want it and burn 'again.'
Eventually the bloom may wear off all that reverb and they might prefer it
the way you did it originally. Ask them to show it around to their friends
and A/B it...they may come around.

CDR's are cheap....

jak

> Andy
>
April 14, 2005 9:48:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Give them what they want and they will be happy.This way they may come back
to you next time.You can always make suggestions and tell them "in your
experience" but if they still want something different then give them what
they want with a smile.This goes for any business.




<aengster@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1113499287.855947.12490@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Hello All,
>
> Probably been discussed here before but...
>
> The performers/customers came over and listened to their mixes and
> really wanted the ambience jacked waaaay up. IMO, it sounds fine
> through the monitors but really bad through the headphones but they
> didn't care.
>
> Burn the disk, hand it off, and move to the next job, right?
>
> Andy
>
Related resources
Anonymous
April 14, 2005 10:14:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1113499287.855947.12490@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com> aengster@gmail.com writes:

> The performers/customers came over and listened to their mixes and
> really wanted the ambience jacked waaaay up. IMO, it sounds fine
> through the monitors but really bad through the headphones but they
> didn't care.

Did you try to figure out why it sounded really bad through the
headphones? What were you doing wroing that you couldn't hear on your
monitors?

I think it's going to come back to haunt you.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
April 14, 2005 11:01:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 4/14/05 1:21 PM, in article
1113499287.855947.12490@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com, "aengster@gmail.com"
<aengster@gmail.com> wrote:

> Hello All,
>
> Probably been discussed here before but...
>
> The performers/customers came over and listened to their mixes and
> really wanted the ambience jacked waaaay up. IMO, it sounds fine
> through the monitors but really bad through the headphones but they
> didn't care.
>
> Burn the disk, hand it off, and move to the next job, right?
>
> Andy
>

Save All Versions
But yeah... They;re payin.
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 12:06:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The customer is not always right.
The customer is always the one with the money.

You can try to persuade them, but at some point the question becomes how
you trade off money against your personal standards. Sometimes the right
thing to do really is to walk away from a job, if completing it that way
will hurt you more than walking away will.
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 3:14:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

aengster@gmail.com wrote:
> Hello All,
>
> Probably been discussed here before but...
>
> The performers/customers came over and listened to their mixes and
> really wanted the ambience jacked waaaay up. IMO, it sounds fine
> through the monitors but really bad through the headphones but they
> didn't care.
>
> Burn the disk, hand it off, and move to the next job, right?
>
> Andy
>

If they hired you as an engineer, then you'd definately let it go,
creative control isn't in your job description. If you're their
"producer/engineer" and they are paying you, tell them what you
think/recommend and if they still insist, let it go. If they're on a
record contract and you're responsible for handing the finished product
off to the record company, tell them to do their job and you'll do yours.

Jonny Durango
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 4:27:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

One more thought: Save the raw tracks... and consider doing alternative
mixes and saving those (and documentation on what the differences
are)... so if/when their friends tell 'em they're wrong you're in a
decent position to fix it.
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 1:23:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

All,

Thanks for the replies, my ears are feeling better already!

Too many mics, software with ample power to to misuse and abuse...

I've been "haunted" too much already for the month and enjoying it!
;-)

Best,
Andy
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 1:43:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

aengster@gmail.com Apr 14, 10:21 am show options
Newsgroups: rec.audio.pro
From: "aengs...@gmail.com" <aengs...@gmail.com> - Find messages by this
author
Date: 14 Apr 2005 10:21:28 -0700
Local: Thurs,Apr 14 2005 10:21 am
Subject: How "right" is the customer?
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Hello All,

Probably been discussed here before but...

The performers/customers came over and listened to their mixes and
really wanted the ambience jacked waaaay up. IMO, it sounds fine
through the monitors but really bad through the headphones but they
didn't care.

Burn the disk, hand it off, and move to the next job, right?

Not really. Problem is that if it doesn't sound right your name will be
attached to it which doesn't do your reputation any good. I also build
bicycles and I'm sometimes asked to deliver an unpainted frame for the
customer to finish. I always refuse because a bad paint job will come
back to haunt me. After a while the customer tires of explaining that
he had if finished himself and agrees that it looks bad. Not good for
my rep-or yours either.
Phil Brown
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 2:07:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Exactly!
I did a project 2 years ago where the clients and I discussed exactly
how we all wanted it to be (in fact, I got the job because the artist
and I were like-minded). During the recording, everything was peachy
and I could do no wrong. When mixdown came around, it was a different
story...somehow, their minds changed completely. I proceeded their
way, got paid and went our seperate ways. I'm in the process of
re-mixing the project as it should have been done, and ran into one of
the group's member's as I had a ruff mix in my vehicle's CD player. He
was surprised that it the stuff sounded as good as it does...They're
coming by next week to listen...and if they like it, I'm considering
what to charge 'em for my re-mixes. I lost a bit of business from
their bad-mouthing the first time, and now is my opportunity to recoup.
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 9:40:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 15 Apr 2005 09:43:05 -0700, "philcycles" <philcycles@aol.com>
wrote:
>
>aengster@gmail.com Apr 14, 10:21 am show options
>Newsgroups: rec.audio.pro
>From: "aengs...@gmail.com" <aengs...@gmail.com> - Find messages by this
>author
>Date: 14 Apr 2005 10:21:28 -0700
>Local: Thurs,Apr 14 2005 10:21 am
>Subject: How "right" is the customer?
>Reply | Reply to Author | Forward | Print | Individual Message | Show
>original | Report Abuse
>
>Hello All,
>
>Probably been discussed here before but...
>
>The performers/customers came over and listened to their mixes and
>really wanted the ambience jacked waaaay up. IMO, it sounds fine
>through the monitors but really bad through the headphones but they
>didn't care.
>
>Burn the disk, hand it off, and move to the next job, right?
>
>Not really. Problem is that if it doesn't sound right your name will be
>attached to it which doesn't do your reputation any good.

There's the idea of having them change the credits, "If anyone asks
about this particular mix, or you make CD's of it or put it on the
web, be sure to say 'Ambient Mix by Alan Smithee.'"

>I also build
>bicycles and I'm sometimes asked to deliver an unpainted frame for the
>customer to finish. I always refuse because a bad paint job will come
>back to haunt me. After a while the customer tires of explaining that
>he had if finished himself and agrees that it looks bad. Not good for
>my rep-or yours either.

I don't suppose Alan Smithee builds unpainted bike frames...

>Phil Brown

-----
http://mindspring.com/~benbradley
Anonymous
April 16, 2005 12:55:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

There's the idea of having them change the credits, "If anyone asks
about this particular mix, or you make CD's of it or put it on the
web, be sure to say 'Ambient Mix by Alan Smithee.'"


Kinda off topic but the director of "An Alan Smithee Film" took his
name off it so it really was an Alan Smithee film.
Phil Brown
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 8:53:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote Wrote:
>
>
> I think it's going to come back to haunt you.
>


I agree. They'll say it's fine, then once their friends and family
tell them how many things are wrong with it, they'll either slander you
in the public eye, or expect you to mix it for free (or both). I'm a
stubborn one, I have a contract that (among other things) says that the
studio won't do remixes for free. Why should we, when it's being played
on two sets of pro speakers, and various consumer systems? Most of the
time it comes down to the client being green...they don't know what
they want really. Be prepared to recall the mixes (even if you have to
write everything down on paper), otherwise you will most likely be
responsible to get the mix back to where it was.


--
Nathan Eldred
!