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Software vs Hardware Effects

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Anonymous
April 15, 2005 9:12:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Once the sound source has been digitally recorded to the hard disk it
seems the options for effects (reverb, gain maximizing, hard limiting,
etc.) are:

1. software effects that come bundled with the recording software
2. third party effects (e.g., Waves)
3. hardware digital effects (digital out on software mix buss to
digital hardware effects and back in on digital in)

Once digitized, one would not want to go back to analog for an effect,
so analog effects are ruled out, right?

Can software effects get you results that compare to a hardware unit?
Are third party effects so superior to the bundled effects to warrant
the cost?

Opinions? Experiences?

Thanks!!
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 10:21:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Recently a client brought in a 480 L for reverb effects. Went from D to A
back to D. Never had a better vocal sound in my studio because of it. UAD-1
has some great effects but dreamverb can't compare to 480 L IMO.

Neil R

<DGoodPub@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:1113567170.717781.159110@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Once the sound source has been digitally recorded to the hard disk it
> seems the options for effects (reverb, gain maximizing, hard limiting,
> etc.) are:
>
> 1. software effects that come bundled with the recording software
> 2. third party effects (e.g., Waves)
> 3. hardware digital effects (digital out on software mix buss to
> digital hardware effects and back in on digital in)
>
> Once digitized, one would not want to go back to analog for an effect,
> so analog effects are ruled out, right?
>
> Can software effects get you results that compare to a hardware unit?
> Are third party effects so superior to the bundled effects to warrant
> the cost?
>
> Opinions? Experiences?
>
> Thanks!!
>
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 11:10:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"DGoodPub@comcast.net" wrote:

>Once the sound source has been digitally recorded to the hard disk it
>seems the options for effects (reverb, gain maximizing, hard limiting,
>etc.) are:
>
>1. software effects that come bundled with the recording software
>2. third party effects (e.g., Waves)
>3. hardware digital effects (digital out on software mix buss to
>digital hardware effects and back in on digital in)
>
>Once digitized, one would not want to go back to analog for an effect,
>so analog effects are ruled out, right?

Wrong! There is nothing inherently wrong with doing this if it gets you
the desired effect. The goal should be the sound one wishes to produce
rather than adherence to some arbitrary "rules."

>Can software effects get you results that compare to a hardware unit?

Some can. Most still tend to prefer analog for pitch-based effects such
as choruses and such. Software time-based effects such as reverbs have
come a ong way, though.

>Are third party effects so superior to the bundled effects to warrant
>the cost?

Some are and some aren't. As usual, audio production is not a paint-by-
number activity, and one's treasure may be another's trash.

>Opinions? Experiences?
>
>Thanks!!


--
========================================================================
Michael Kesti | "And like, one and one don't make
| two, one and one make one."
mkesti@gv.net | - The Who, Bargain
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Anonymous
April 15, 2005 4:25:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1113567170.717781.159110@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> DGoodPub@comcast.net writes:

> Once digitized, one would not want to go back to analog for an effect,
> so analog effects are ruled out, right?

Wrong. Only people with the old Soundblaster mentality have a right to
that opinion. While it may bother you intellectually, with today's D/A
and A/D converters, there's no reason not to use an outboard effect if
it sounds good. Nobody will ever know, or care, once the project is
mixed.

> Can software effects get you results that compare to a hardware unit?
> Are third party effects so superior to the bundled effects to warrant
> the cost?

Yes and no to both of your questions. There are some effects and
proceesses that are simply not available in hardware. There are some
software processes that are very well done and are equivalent, though
usually a little different, to hardware. And there are some that are
just weird. One advantage to using software effects is that they're
generally cheaper than hardware effects.

Also, they don't take up any rack space, and don't require cables. But
they still need equivalent functions to all of those - they may not
take up rack space but they require CPU horsepower (or auxilary DSP
hardware). They don't use cables, but they need to be logically
integrated into the software. And because they don't have physical
controls, more screen real estate is required to make adjustments.
Since it's easier to reach for a knob than to open a window and grab a
virtual knob with a mouse, some people tend to do less "live tweaking"
with software effects, opting to use a manufacturer's (or their own)
preset.

It's nice to have a choice. Don't think that you have no choice just
because you have a computer.
\

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 9:13:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<DGoodPub@comcast.net> schreef in bericht
news:1113567170.717781.159110@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Once the sound source has been digitally recorded to the hard disk it
> seems the options for effects (reverb, gain maximizing, hard limiting,
> etc.) are:
>
> 1. software effects that come bundled with the recording software
> 2. third party effects (e.g., Waves)
> 3. hardware digital effects (digital out on software mix buss to
> digital hardware effects and back in on digital in)
>
> Once digitized, one would not want to go back to analog for an effect,
> so analog effects are ruled out, right?

Not really! When whanting an real leslie, you would want to use a reall
leslie instead of an replica.
Some of the analog effects like plates/real rooms have a special sound that
can not be replicated exactly.
There will always be a bit of a different sound....

>
> Can software effects get you results that compare to a hardware unit?
> Are third party effects so superior to the bundled effects to warrant
> the cost?
>
> Opinions? Experiences?
>

There are some opnions on this topic inside the software part of
www.effectprocessor.com


--
--
Kind regards,
Studio Froombosch



Harrie Munnik
T: +31 598 390107
F: +31 598 381976
I: www.effectprocessor.com
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 10:40:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

DGoodPub@comcast.net wrote:
> Once the sound source has been digitally recorded to the hard disk it
> seems the options for effects (reverb, gain maximizing, hard limiting,
> etc.) are:
>
> 1. software effects that come bundled with the recording software
> 2. third party effects (e.g., Waves)
> 3. hardware digital effects (digital out on software mix buss to
> digital hardware effects and back in on digital in)
>
> Once digitized, one would not want to go back to analog for an effect,
> so analog effects are ruled out, right?

As others have already pointed out, this is not necessarily so. However,
given a choice between an analog effect and an equivalent digital
effect, I would tend to prefer the digital if only because keeping
things digital reduces the possibility of conversion artifacts.

> Can software effects get you results that compare to a hardware unit?

There are two kinds of hardware units: digital and analog.

A digital hardware unit uses software inside the box. So in principle it
is equivalent to a software effect. Of course, it is not unusual for a
vendor will build a superior algorithm into a hardware unit as a form of
copy protection. The difference is in the algorithm, not in the box.

An analog hardware unit will generally be different from software in the
results it can provide. Different isn't necessarily better or worse. It
depends on what you want.


> Are third party effects so superior to the bundled effects to warrant
> the cost?

Sometimes.

>
> Opinions? Experiences?
>
> Thanks!!
>
!