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cassette to mp3 conversion

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Anonymous
April 17, 2005 5:47:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hello,

I am looking for some sort of device that will record from cassettes to
mp3. Just like you have a cassette to cassette recorder which really
quickly copies to the contents of one tape to another, I need a quick
way to record it to mp3. Is there such a device to play a tape, record
via sound cable or whatever into the pc, record with software as an
mp3, then play at regular speed?

Please reply on the newsgroup (rather than email)

Thanks so much

Richard
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 11:11:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

dickberman@hotmail.com wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I am looking for some sort of device that will record from cassettes
> to mp3. Just like you have a cassette to cassette recorder which
> really quickly copies to the contents of one tape to another, I need
> a quick way to record it to mp3. Is there such a device to play a
> tape, record via sound cable or whatever into the pc, record with
> software as an mp3, then play at regular speed?

This question comes up from time to time, but there don't seem to be
any commercial devices that work this way.

Technically, it can be done with off-the-shelf technology.

It seems like it would be possible to tap into the circuitry of a high
speed cassette duplicator to get the sped-up audio signal.

We clearly have audio interfaces that can handle digitzing audio
signals at up to 10x for excellent audio quality, maybe up to 20x for
the sort of quality one usually gets on a cassette.

Slowing the digital data down for conversion into to normal MP3s is a
simple clerical operation that some software like Adobe Audition does
as a matter of course. A very simple stand-alone program to do this
could be written quite easily.

But, nobody has put all the pieces together and created a commercial
product, it seems.
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 1:31:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<dickberman@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>I am looking for some sort of device that will record from cassettes to
>mp3. Just like you have a cassette to cassette recorder which really
>quickly copies to the contents of one tape to another, I need a quick
>way to record it to mp3. Is there such a device to play a tape, record
>via sound cable or whatever into the pc, record with software as an
>mp3, then play at regular speed?

No. It's hard enough to get decent transcriptions from cassettes in realtime,
and it's something that you have to do while listening, you can't do it
unattended because you have to ride azimuth. If you have a huge number of
cassette dubs to do and you don't have the time, contract it out to a
company like Full Track in Seattle that specializes in large dub jobs.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Related resources
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 2:29:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1113727637.555348.191680@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> dickberman@hotmail.com writes:

> I am looking for some sort of device that will record from cassettes to
> mp3. Just like you have a cassette to cassette recorder which really
> quickly copies to the contents of one tape to another, I need a quick
> way to record it to mp3.

You've already wasted enough time to copy several dozen tapes. Why not
just make a real-time copy and be done with it? Even if you're talking
several hundred tapes, you still have to load and unload each one.

> Is there such a device to play a tape, record
> via sound cable or whatever into the pc, record with software as an
> mp3, then play at regular speed?

You have to play the cassette - no getting around that. There are no
files you can rip. Some of the Portastudio cassette decks will run at
double speed, but if you want to go any faster than that, you need a
professional duplicator transport. Also, when you double the speed,
you move everything up an octave, so if there's anything above 10 kHz
on your tapes, it will get stripped off if your digital sample rate is
the common 44.1 kHz.

If you want to record at double speed and then get the speed back back
to normal with the computer, you'll probably need to record in WAV
format (because that's what the vari-speed tools use), and given the
size of the file you'll have, it will probably take about as long to
adjust the speed and then convert to MP3 as if you had made a
real-time copy.

Time's a'wastin'.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 3:18:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 17 Apr 2005 01:47:17 -0700, dickberman@hotmail.com wrote:

>Hello,
>
>I am looking for some sort of device that will record from cassettes to
>mp3. Just like you have a cassette to cassette recorder which really
>quickly copies to the contents of one tape to another, I need a quick
>way to record it to mp3. Is there such a device to play a tape, record
>via sound cable or whatever into the pc, record with software as an
>mp3, then play at regular speed?
>

Is audio quality important? If you've ever used a high-speed
cassette copier, you'll know how bad the quality is.
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 6:01:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Many MP3 players these days have line in so you can convert pretty much
ANY Audio source into an MP3, I have a Creative Jukebox with a 10 gig
in it that does it and an iRiver 380T(128 meg) that does it(even has
mic built in)

Skennen Peace

http://kwiter.wishe.org
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 7:25:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Don't think it's possible to do this high speed...

See http://www.plusdeck.com/Englishsite/product_01.html for internal PC
cassette deck.

Just a thought - some cassette decks did play at double speed (and many
double decks do high speed dubbing), so an output from these could be
recorded into PC soundcard and slowed down in audio software to play at
correct speed...
Should be OK for speech - not sure how it would sound on music?! - depends
on your requirements...

Guy

dickberman@hotmail.com wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I am looking for some sort of device that will record from cassettes
> to mp3. Just like you have a cassette to cassette recorder which
> really quickly copies to the contents of one tape to another, I need
> a quick way to record it to mp3. Is there such a device to play a
> tape, record via sound cable or whatever into the pc, record with
> software as an mp3, then play at regular speed?
>
> Please reply on the newsgroup (rather than email)
>
> Thanks so much
>
> Richard
Anonymous
February 2, 2010 1:02:48 PM

Hi Everyone,

The method I use to convert my tapes to digital audio, is as follows....

Devices/software/equipment required:

- Tape deck (with L&R audio lineout)
- 2RCA to 3.5mm (stereo plug) audio cable
- laptop (or PC) with 3.5mm stereo mic socket built-in. Computer will also require soundcard.
- Download & Install FREE software program called AUDACITY 1.3 (stereo line-in recorder. Also supports mic input record) - search Google for this if necessary.
- Download additonal Audacity MP3 convertor program (called LAME) - you will be prompted for this.

Steps:

1) Configure Audacity software to record audio from your mic input (instead of your speakers).
2) Connect audio cable (2RCA plugs) to the line-out from your tape deck
3) Connect audio cable (3.5mm stereo plug) into your PC's mic input
4) Select Audacity to record (from mic input) - adjust stereo channel levels using meters
5) Playback cassette on your tape deck (sorry, this is only done in real time).

Audacity software will start recording input audio as a digital file.

Once you have clicked stop, you can then edit any part of the file, before exporting it to your hard drive as an MP3 file (or any other audio format you require).

Cheers,
!