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DEQ2496 auto correction

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Anonymous
April 18, 2005 6:34:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I just picked up a DEQ2496 today, and I've been trying it out with my
playback rig, taking the digital out from my MOTU into the DEQ, and then the
analog outs straight to my Events. I'm using the DEQ as the volume control
too, so I have about as little in the signal path as I can get.

Anyway, I thought I'd try the auto-correction feature to see if I can get a
better response from the Events, and to dial in the response to my mix
position. The resulting curve basically scooped a fair bit out of the low
mids, brought up some of the high mids, and dampened some of the highs. When
I listen to some of my existing mixes, well they sound about the way people
have critiqued them in the past, too nasaly. The only other monitors I've
heard the mixes through myself were a set of Genelec 1029As, and what I hear
now is pretty close to what I heard at that time. I well know that the
Events have some real issues with the response curve, but surely not -this-
bad!

Just how accurate is the auto-correction process on these units anyway?

Sean
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 11:36:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>I just picked up a DEQ2496 today, and I've been trying it out with my
> playback rig, taking the digital out from my MOTU into the DEQ, and then
> the
> analog outs straight to my Events. I'm using the DEQ as the volume control
> too, so I have about as little in the signal path as I can get.
>
> Anyway, I thought I'd try the auto-correction feature to see if I can get
> a
> better response from the Events, and to dial in the response to my mix
> position. The resulting curve basically scooped a fair bit out of the low
> mids, brought up some of the high mids, and dampened some of the highs.
> When
> I listen to some of my existing mixes, well they sound about the way
> people
> have critiqued them in the past, too nasaly. The only other monitors I've
> heard the mixes through myself were a set of Genelec 1029As, and what I
> hear
> now is pretty close to what I heard at that time. I well know that the
> Events have some real issues with the response curve, but surely
> not -this-
> bad!
>
> Just how accurate is the auto-correction process on these units anyway?
>
> Sean
>

Sean:

I'm certain the box is fairly accurate, but I would suggest using several
mic positions to ensure that you are getting a room average. There will be
quite large differences in the response when sampled at different locations
in your room, so relying on a single point may be giving you fairly large
response deviations. If you sample at several points, the box will adjust to
give the best overall response curve. This has worked amazingly well for me
at FOH in front of PA stacks.

Craig
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 9:31:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Sean Conolly wrote:

> I just picked up a DEQ2496 today ...
> [snip]
> how accurate is the auto-correction process on these units anyway?

Dunno, I will get one eventually - a daw upgrade has precedence - but
the first question to ask is what frequency response to aim for, because
"dead linear" on pink noise is hardly ever correct.

The larger the room, the worse it is going to get, way too overbright
and harsh. There may be some Bruel and Kjaer publication on it .... I
can recall some recommendation from the danish magazine High Fidelity
that had B&K knowhow as source.

A nearby thread discusses feedback issues, ie. by definition also PA
system response. I have heard one PA that was aligned for linear on pink
noise in a big tent, something Meyer. In terms of quality the treble was
very good, and Meyer must use very durable components, but in terms of
perceived sonic balance it was awful, and an extreme cause of listening
fatigue in spite of not even being loud, just wrong.

A better starting point is to take your loudspeakers to an anechoic room
and let the thingy align for linear response there, doing that will at
least make the initial sound from the speakers less incorrect than it
was previusly.

A linear system in a real world room should not ever meaure linear, it
has to have the contour the combination of room and distance creates,
including that it probably is wrong to compensate for the treble loss
caused by air absorbtion, the hearing system knows about that roll-off
and expects it.

> Sean


Kind regards

Peter Larsen

--
*******************************************
* My site is at: http://www.muyiovatki.dk *
*******************************************
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Anonymous
April 20, 2005 12:58:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Peter Larsen" <SPAMSHIELD_plarsen@mail.tele.dk> wrote in message
news:4263D2EC.600B7781@mail.tele.dk...
> Sean Conolly wrote:
>
> > I just picked up a DEQ2496 today ...
> > [snip]
> > how accurate is the auto-correction process on these units anyway?
>
> Dunno, I will get one eventually - a daw upgrade has precedence - but
> the first question to ask is what frequency response to aim for, because
> "dead linear" on pink noise is hardly ever correct.
>
> The larger the room, the worse it is going to get, way too overbright
> and harsh. There may be some Bruel and Kjaer publication on it .... I
> can recall some recommendation from the danish magazine High Fidelity
> that had B&K knowhow as source.

They have a "room mode" option that drops the response by 1db per otcave as
it goes up the scale. Don't know how well it fits the problem, but at least
they tried.

Sean
Anonymous
April 20, 2005 1:03:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"ceedub" <craigmw@EFOFFSPAMcox.net> wrote in message news:GBP8e.22428> I'm
certain the box is fairly accurate, but I would suggest using several
> mic positions to ensure that you are getting a room average. There will be
> quite large differences in the response when sampled at different
locations
> in your room, so relying on a single point may be giving you fairly large
> response deviations. If you sample at several points, the box will adjust
to
> give the best overall response curve. This has worked amazingly well for
me
> at FOH in front of PA stacks.


This is true, but I'm trying to set the response to the fairly small area
that my head occupies when I'm listening. This is all on DAW, and I sit
right at the keyboard so my ears are probably within 6 inches of the
reference position at all times. Besides, my Events have a pretty narrow
sweet spot in the first place.

Sean
!