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Can anyone fix my EV RE55?

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Anonymous
April 20, 2005 12:07:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi all...

I just sent in an RE55 to EV to have it repaired, and it came back with
a note saying that they cannot repair the mic...

Does anyone know of any other options for repair?

The mic works, but it sounds like there's bacon frying in the
background.
An intermittant crackling...

Thanks in advance...

Bruce

More about : fix re55

April 20, 2005 10:20:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

tonewoods@rockisland.com wrote:
> Hi all...
>
> I just sent in an RE55 to EV to have it repaired, and it came back with
> a note saying that they cannot repair the mic...

Who did you send it to? Was it EV?

--
Eric

Practice Your Mixing Skills
www.Raw-Tracks.com
www.Mad-Host.com
Anonymous
April 20, 2005 12:49:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<tonewoods@rockisland.com> wrote:
>Hi all...
>
>I just sent in an RE55 to EV to have it repaired, and it came back with
>a note saying that they cannot repair the mic...
>
>Does anyone know of any other options for repair?
>
>The mic works, but it sounds like there's bacon frying in the
>background.
>An intermittant crackling...

Any tech can resolder the connections inside, which is a possible
issue. BUT, that sort of thing can also be caused by an break in the
coil wire, which is basically unrepairable.

I don't know anybody who can repair damaged dynamic elements. It really
shouldn't be all that difficult... you'd need some specialized winding
jigs for various microphones and you'd need to get a supplier to make
you some mylar diaphragms, but it doesn't seem like it would be THAT
much worse than reconing speakers. But nobody is doing it.

There are a huge number of 666 mikes out there with open coils too.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
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Anonymous
April 20, 2005 3:12:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks all for the input....

"Who did you send it to? Was it EV? "

I sent it to Telex, who now does the authorized repairs on EV mics...

It wasn't all that long ago that if you sent a mic to EV to have it
repaired, it came back fixed, and they didn't charge for the service
(!).
It was too good to be true, and alas, those days are over...

I *highly* recommend insisting on an estimate before having Telex
undertake repairs on your mic, based on this recent experience.
I sent in the RE55 and a 635a, and they fixed the 635a and charged 91
bucks plus shipping without informing me on what it would cost...
Not exacly what I had in mind...

Bruce
Anonymous
April 20, 2005 4:56:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1114020779.482509.169410@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
tonewoods@rockisland.com wrote:

> Thanks all for the input....
>
> "Who did you send it to? Was it EV? "
>
> I sent it to Telex, who now does the authorized repairs on EV mics...
>
> It wasn't all that long ago that if you sent a mic to EV to have it
> repaired, it came back fixed, and they didn't charge for the service
> (!).
> It was too good to be true, and alas, those days are over...
>
> I *highly* recommend insisting on an estimate before having Telex
> undertake repairs on your mic, based on this recent experience.
> I sent in the RE55 and a 635a, and they fixed the 635a and charged 91
> bucks plus shipping without informing me on what it would cost...
> Not exacly what I had in mind...
>
> Bruce
>

I just sent a PZM to be repaired by Crown. They quoted $118 and a day later
called up sheepishly asking if it would be OK to send me a NEW PZM instead. For
the same price. Well, Ok. They had evidentally thrown away the mic assuming
that it was a replacement job instead. There seems to be a bit of confusion in
the repair sector these days.

-Jay
--
x------- Jay Kadis ------- x---- Jay's Attic Studio ------x
x Lecturer, Audio Engineer x Dexter Records x
x CCRMA, Stanford University x http://www.offbeats.com/ x
x---------- http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jay/ ------------x
Anonymous
April 20, 2005 6:04:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<tonewoods@rockisland.com>
>
> I just sent in an RE55 to EV to have it repaired, and it came back with
> a note saying that they cannot repair the mic...
>
> Does anyone know of any other options for repair?
>
> The mic works, but it sounds like there's bacon frying in the
> background.
> An intermittant crackling...
>


** Have you tried turning off the phantom power ??

Hard to see how an dynamic can make noise with no power source.




........... Phil
Anonymous
April 20, 2005 7:53:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 20 Apr 2005 08:49:07 -0400, kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

> <tonewoods@rockisland.com> wrote:
>>Hi all...
>>
>>I just sent in an RE55 to EV to have it repaired, and it came back with
>>a note saying that they cannot repair the mic...
>>
>>Does anyone know of any other options for repair?
>>
>>The mic works, but it sounds like there's bacon frying in the
>>background.
>>An intermittant crackling...
>
>Any tech can resolder the connections inside, which is a possible
>issue. BUT, that sort of thing can also be caused by an break in the
>coil wire, which is basically unrepairable.
>
>I don't know anybody who can repair damaged dynamic elements. It really
>shouldn't be all that difficult... you'd need some specialized winding
>jigs for various microphones and you'd need to get a supplier to make
>you some mylar diaphragms, but it doesn't seem like it would be THAT
>much worse than reconing speakers. But nobody is doing it.
>
>There are a huge number of 666 mikes out there with open coils too.

I'm speaking out of ignorance here, but there are quite a few guys out
there rewinding and making electric guitar pickups, couldn't that gear
be modified to be used for repairing the coils?

Al
Anonymous
April 20, 2005 11:07:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

playon <playonAT@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>I'm speaking out of ignorance here, but there are quite a few guys out
>there rewinding and making electric guitar pickups, couldn't that gear
>be modified to be used for repairing the coils?

I dunno, I never saw a pickup rebuilt. It would seem like a much easier
thing to do, though, at least if it's like making chokes and transformers.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 3:34:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 4/20/05 7:07 PM, in article d46nbb$2c7$1@panix2.panix.com, "Scott Dorsey"
<kludge@panix.com> wrote:

> playon <playonAT@comcast.net> wrote:
>>
>> I'm speaking out of ignorance here, but there are quite a few guys out
>> there rewinding and making electric guitar pickups, couldn't that gear
>> be modified to be used for repairing the coils?
>
> I dunno, I never saw a pickup rebuilt. It would seem like a much easier
> thing to do, though, at least if it's like making chokes and transformers.

Same thing. You;re talking VERY do-able real-thin-wire-on-a-bobbin.
And remember, in a pickup, NOTHING MOVES,
Not so in a mic...
I repositioned a ribbon once in a nothing-to-lose Rca Junior situation and
it was cool, I'm still kinda goggle-eyed that you can rediaphragm a
condensor mic outside of a micro-waldo-clean-room, recone a speaker pretty
easy, and drop-in-diaphragms for compression drivers are normal field fixes
as of +40yrs ago. The sheer tiny size, fragile former, glues and critical
mass and flexibility that are so critical to a dynamic mic make me just get
all crazy thinkin about it.
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 3:20:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"SSJVCmag"

> The sheer tiny size, fragile former, glues and critical
> mass and flexibility that are so critical to a dynamic mic make me just
> get
> all crazy thinkin about it.
>


** I still have a small stock of AKG D19 diaphragms which are the ones
used in the famous D12 "bass drum" mic. Theses were available for a couple
of dollars each from AKG as replacements for the D12 since it used a screw
down metal ring to hold the edge of the diaphragm in place. Fixed quite few
broken D12s that way.

The D19 diaphragm was also used in the D707 and D190 mics.





............. Phil
!