Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

56k modem driver update.

Last response: in Components
Share
May 23, 2003 8:55:08 PM

I have a supra modem. It's a Generic 56K HCF Data Fax Modem (COM3). It's a winmodem or a softmodem. I play recently released games online like battlefeild 1942. And with this kind of modem it doesn't work very well. Before I go buy a better 56k modem. I want to install the best driver to see if it will improve my online gaming.

First of all I want to know if the driver that installed automaticly for my modem is the best one to play online games?

If it's not can you guys please answer my following questions?

My modem manufacturer is called Rockwell right?

If so I went to there website: http://www.rockwell.com/. I want to update my driver.

So is this the right website to do this?

I could go click on "Software Updates". Maybe my driver will be there. But I have to register. But I don't want to do that for nothing. Because maybe my driver won't be there.

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Zemuron on 05/23/03 04:56 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
May 23, 2003 9:52:02 PM

<A HREF="http://members.cnx.net/reboot/modems/" target="_new">Rockwell/Conexant Modem Drivers</A>

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
May 23, 2003 11:50:23 PM

The link that you gave me says that it is recommended to contact my modem manufacturer for drivers. I sent an e-mail to support from http://www.rockwell.com/. But I'm just not sure that the support team from the website knows about Rockwell modems. Does anybody know if they do know or not?

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Zemuron on 05/23/03 07:51 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
Related resources
May 24, 2003 3:39:40 AM

Comments:

Occasionally, every repair technician will run across a newer user, who, in order to achieve the best system performance (and to avoid causing fatal errors) will end interpreting instructions so literally, and/or with so much fear or trepidation that before installing a driver, updating a program, or attempting anything that makes them feel unsure, will instead end up doing virtually nothing.

That, friend, is the distinct impression I'm getting when I re-read your posts ... and just might apply to you.

Next, consider this. Besides mentioning the type of modem, and that it is "generic", you include no mention of anything else in regards to your system, although you wish for the best driver to be installed. This type of information should include items such as the brand and model number of the mainboard, whether the modem is internal or external, the operating system version, and if the computer is a proprietary system (Compaq, Dell, etc) or a white box machine built by a local dealer, or hand-assembled by yourself. Basic details like this can make an enormous difference when installing hardware, or selecting the correct driver for a device. Computer science is , well, a <i>science</i>, and has nothing to do with the Psychic Friends network. Attention to details, and providing those same details when asking for information remotely (and sight-unseen) is an extremely important part of literal communication.

Please forgive the personal critique, but I thought that touching on these two areas might give you a leg up when looking for troubleshooting information in the future.

Now, in regards to your questions:

Quote:
<i>The link that you gave me says that it is recommended to contact my modem manufacturer for drivers. I sent an e-mail to support from http://www.rockwell.com/. But I'm just not sure that the support team from the website knows about Rockwell modems. Does anybody know if they do know or not?</i>

I believe that the website cautions against installing the drivers listed on the web page, simply because the modem might be a proprietary device, and not a retail modem that can be bought by any user in a standard outlet, such as Circuit City, Office Depot, Wal-MART, etc. That is not to say that the modem driver won't function adequately (as in my experience, there is a certain amount of leeway in this area, which is especially applicable to modems and modem drivers), but mentioned only so the best driver for a particular device can be applied, all in the name of achieving the best performance with the hardware in question.

I would also tend to think that the support team employed by the company who actually manufactures the device would have the best idea of what driver should be installed for said hardware.

My personal opinion would be this: If you do not have a proprietary system ... try one of the drivers listed on the page. Then test the modem, and see if the performance while has improved. If not, reinstall the device using the default Windows driver.

If you would prefer to wait, and hope that the support team returns your e-mail with a link to a web address with a suggestion for yet another driver, that's your choice.

However;

First tier support teams are notorious across the industry for providing less than adequate support for products,

If you didn't include specific details about the modem (such as the model number), the operating system you are running, and other relevant aspects about your system, the details in the e-mail you may eventually receive might be somewhat vague (or totally useless),

And,

<i>Eventually</i> possibly being anything from one working day to something approaching when hell freezes over, whatever comes first, depending on the personal reliability/working knowledge of the individual who handles your request ... and the volume of e-mail sent into the support site each day.

Because of this, IMHO, I'd have to say that your best chance of success lies in some experimentation, such as installing more than one modem driver, and then performing real world tests to get the best results. In addition, adjusting different aspects of the operating system default settings for the TCP/IP stack (such as the MTU, MSS, & RWIN), installing an different modem string, and flashing/updating the modem circuitry might achieve your long-term goals.

You might also achieve better results by having a second phone line installed, and telling the phone company that you wish to have a "data line", so that there is less chance of noise. But be advised, there is no real guarantee that the new line will <i>actually</i> have less noise ... the telephone company won't be particularly interested, and data lines cost more, while not being anything really except just another phone line ... call it what you will. It's your money.

You'd be better off, IMHO, by asking if it is possible to purchase a dedicated <A HREF="http://www.alumni.caltech.edu/~dank/isdn/isdn_ai.html" target="_new">ISDN</A> line (if no other types of broadband are available in your area) although this won't necessarily be cheap. But it's a much better solution than dial-up.

Web sites you might find useful when looking for the best overall performance with your device:

<A HREF="http://compnetworking.about.com/cs/speedtests/" target="_new">Speed Tests - Bandwidth Tests</A>

<A HREF="http://members.tripod.com/~MikeRead/modem95.htm" target="_new">Tuning Modem Performance in Windows 95</A>

<A HREF="http://lonestar.texas.net/helpdesk/336.html" target="_new">Getting Peak Performance From Your Modem</A>

<A HREF="http://www.56k.com/trouble/connect.shtml" target="_new">56K Modem Troubleshooting Guide</A>

<A HREF="http://www.angelfire.com/super/infopages/html/modemperf..." target="_new">Info on Modem Performance</A>

<A HREF="http://www.winguides.com/registry/category.php/52/" target="_new">Registry Guide for Windows</A>

Good luck.

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
May 24, 2003 5:13:30 AM

Shut up. I already told you that Diamond made the Supra brand modems. You didn't even know if it was PCI or ISA.

I'm going to assume it's PCI. Get generic drivers for your modem from www.driverguide.com. Registration is free.

You are too damned lazy to open your case and even read the information on the modem chip, so don't keep bothering people for advice in here.

You don't even deserve the info I've given you, I'm just posting to get you to STFU!

<font color=blue>Watts mean squat if you don't have quality!</font color=blue>
May 24, 2003 5:16:55 AM

amen to that. when is this dumb thing going to go away?

<font color=red> black </font color=red> <font color=green> white </font color=green> <font color=blue> yellow </font color=blue> <font color=orange> purple </font color=orange> <font color=black> red </font color=black> <font color=yellow> green </font color=yellow> <font color=purple> blue </font color=purple>
May 24, 2003 5:55:01 AM

Whew ... I must have missed something! Maybe I should stay out of the Component forum, cause you guys have obviously had it up to your ears with this fella at some point in time.

That's what I get for only popping in once a day or so.

Oh well, a little sidestep, Charles Durning-style, and I'm outa here. :wink:

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
May 24, 2003 6:51:06 AM

Crashman: How old are you?

The reason I didn't go check in my case for whatever reason you want me to is because I have a disability. I had an accident 3 years ago and I'm paralysed from my nipples down. So it's hard for me to open up the case and help is not alwas available.

Then you said that "supra modem" is made by diamond. BUT IF YOU READ MY PREVIOUS POSTS I said:

"I did a google search and it says:
"Supra modems are based on the Rockwell (now Conexant Systems) chipset and support both 56kFlex and V.90 standards."

So why did you say diamond made the supra modem?

Do you want me to check if it's a pci or a isa because the 2 have different drivers?
May 24, 2003 12:48:44 PM

Since you didn't actually direct the post to Crash, I'll attempt to give you an answer.

Quote:
Crashman: How old are you?

I don't think this is relevant to the subject matter.

FYI, Crashman has helped more people on this forum than everyone else combined, including myself, and the members here hold him in the highest regard. I've rarely seen him react badly when someone asks a question, so you must have caused him a considerable amount of frustration.

And also, FYI ... flaming is not conducive to carrying on an adult, literate conversation, so I'd suggest that you avoid participating, even if you didn't start it. Stupid is as stupid does.

Quote:
The reason I didn't go check in my case for whatever reason you want me to is because I have a disability. I had an accident 3 years ago and I'm paralysed from my nipples down. So it's hard for me to open up the case and help is not alwas available.

You are not the first person to come here with a disability. Perhaps you don't like discussing it, but mentioning the problem in the first place could have made things a little easier, as then no one would have been wondering why you were having so much difficulty opening the can and looking at the modem. It's not about whether or not we would feel sorry for you or not ... it's about stating the facts, so everyone understands the situation.

Quote:
Then you said that "supra modem" is made by diamond. BUT IF YOU READ MY PREVIOUS POSTS I said:

"I did a google search and it says:
"Supra modems are based on the Rockwell (now Conexant Systems) chipset and support both 56kFlex and V.90 standards."

So why did you say diamond made the supra modem?

Why? Because he is absolutely correct, that's why.

Many manufacturer's use similar, or even the same components, and then rebadge the product under a different brand name. And Diamond <i>did</i> make the Supra modems.

I'd suggest that you download and install the <A HREF="http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html" target="_new">Belarc Advisor</A> and find out exactly what components are in your system. Then you'll know what the modem is ... and have a better idea of what driver to install. Search for the modem afterwards, and locate the driver. That's how the rest of us would handle the situation.

Quote:
Do you want me to check if it's a pci or a isa because the 2 have different drivers?

PCI and ISA ... a different bus, with ISA being the older standard. And yes, the driver would not be the same, simply due to that fact. I'd advise you to search for the differences between the ISA and PCI bus (and 16-bit vs 32-bit devices) in order to educate yourself on the subject ... if you had, then you wouldn't have asked the question in the first place. Gaining a little knowledge isn't a bad thing.

If you actually have a Diamond modem, check out this <A HREF="http://www.mitsubishi-electric.com.au/downloads/diavoic..." target="_new">page</A>.

After reading this, if you are a reasonably intelligent fellow, I see no reason why you shouldn't be able to find the correct driver for your device, without any additional intervention from the Community.

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
May 24, 2003 8:58:13 PM

Toejam31: Why do you suggest that I stop participating? I don't understand. Does that mean I can't post anymore question of anykind in the community?

I didn't want to start any madness. I'm sorry men
May 24, 2003 9:40:23 PM

I'll attempt to speak plainly:

1.) I am not in charge of whether you continue to post here at THGC. Whether you wish to be here is entirely up to you, unless the web site moderator tosses you out, which would only be because you have done something against the rules of the community.

2.) What I suggested is that you do not do anything to start, continue, or participate in a flame war, whether with one individual, or an entire group.

If neither of these concepts is clear to you, then I would think that you might not enjoy your stay here, and should find another forum to express your concerns, or find help with your system.

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
May 25, 2003 7:39:02 AM

I opened my case and it says diamond on the modem and it's also in a white slot. In the booklet for the modem it says that white slots are for pci.

I downloaded, installed and started Belarc Advisor. But about my modem it doesn't say much. It's says:

" Generic 56K HCF Data Fax Modem
RAS Async Adapter"

So in http://www.mitsubishi-electric.com.au/downloads/diavoic... in the "Internal Modems - PCI Bus" I don't know witch driver to install.

These are the drivers in the "Internal Modems - PCI Bus section":

1.Diamond Voice 56P Internal PCI Modem
2.Diamond Voice/Actiontec PCI Pro Modem (PM560LHI)
3.Diamond Voice 56 VPL internal PCI bus modem (Lucent chipset)
4.Diamond Voice 56 VP internal PCI bus modem (Rockwell chipset).

So witch driver would be the right one for my modem? The first driver I mentioned above can be installed on windows xp and this is what I have. I don't think the other ones can be installed on Windows xp. So should I download and install this driver? I just don't want to do any damage to my modem.



<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Zemuron on 05/25/03 03:40 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
May 25, 2003 8:44:53 AM

Do the drivers really matter here? It's not like he'll get a 100k/s increase. It's a 56 k connection so it's definitely not meant for multiplayer gaming dont you think?

<font color=blue><b>OKK!! Which one of you wise guys stole my sig! :frown: :tongue: </font color=blue></b><font color=red><b><i>Jay Kay</font color=red></b></i>
May 25, 2003 8:48:43 AM

Modem drivers are software, and won't damage the hardware, even if you install the wrong one. The modem just won't work as well (or at all) if the wrong driver is installed.

I'd suggest you try the WinXP driver, which is the only XP driver listed on the page for an internal Diamond 56K PCI modem. There weren't four options ... only the one. Look again, and take a moment to read carefully this time around.

If that doesn't work, I can't tell you anything more without knowing the FCC number on the modem, so it can be identified exactly. The number will designate the type of Rockwell chip, and the model number of the modem. These are items that every user needs to install a modem driver ... the brand of the modem, the serial and/or FCC number (usually on a white sticker on the side of the modem), the model number (also on a sticker, or printed on the PCB), and which operating system is in use. If you knew these things, you would be able to locate the driver on your own using through a search engine, and wouldn't need additional help from anyone here at the forum.

Consider it a learning experience.

Of course, you <i>could</i> just solve the entire problem by getting rid of the modem, and purchasing something that is easily identified, and comes with a functional driver disk. I particularly like <A HREF="http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.gsp?product_id=1..." target="_new">Broadxent V.92 PCI Data/Fax/Voice Modems</A> (a division of Creative). The price is reasonable ... the driver is extremely easy to locate on the CD, and it will suit your purposes quite nicely, with a minimum of fuss and bother. You can buy one online through the link, or go down to your local Wal-Mart and pick one up. I installed one last week, and the whole process was very smooth ... almost foolproof.

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
May 25, 2003 9:14:01 AM

Oh, no ... I agree, the driver really isn't the issue. I don't think it makes one whit of difference whether he uses the default WinXP driver, the Diamond driver, or a generic HCF Rockwell driver. It's still going to be a 56K modem, with all the limitations that implies ... and regardless of the initial connection speed of the handshake (which is deceiving, since the negotiation continues), the modem not going to download any faster, and nor will a different driver give him much better ping times. It's all about the routing on the 'Net when he tries to connect to a gaming server, the traffic, and the overall condition of the phone line.

But it's not me that needs convincing on the subject.

I've suggested that the best thing to do is tweak the TCP/IP stack properties in the Registry if he wants to keep the modem, although that won't make a great deal of difference in the long run either, IMHO. If getting rid of the modem is a viable option, and he can't get broadband, then I suggested he give some thought to inquiring about getting an ISDN line. Or heck, he could even even get two modems and shotgun them (if I recall correctly, ???, Supra modems could be configured this way). That would improve the download speed a certain degree, but it would also require an extra phone line, a second dial-up account, and permission from the ISP. And it still wouldn't change the fact that it was 56K dial-up, and (correct me if I'm wrong), but the upload wouldn't be affected, and it would still be just 5K or so.

I don't think anyone enjoys multi-player gaming with a dial-up modem. It's frustrating, at best.

But sometimes people have to find out things the hard way.

That's it for me ... I'm outa here.

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
June 1, 2003 11:41:46 PM

Toejam31:

An "ISDN line" is that a high speed internet connections?

If it is then I don't think I can get a ISDN line or any kind of high speed connection other then satelite high speed connection. But that doesn't work well with recently released pc games

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Zemuron on 06/01/03 07:44 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
June 2, 2003 1:16:08 AM

<A HREF="http://www.alumni.caltech.edu/~dank/isdn/isdn_ai.html#W..." target="_new">What is ISDN, anyway?</A>

ISDN is an <i>Integrated Services Digital Network</i>. ISDN is a high-speed, high capacity digital communication line, and usually at least twice as fast as a 56K modem. Basic Rate ISDN is comprised of two communication paths called channels. The two primary channels communicate at 64 kilobits per second (kbps) and the third at 16 kbps. The third channel is primarily used for behind-the-scenes signaling.

The only way to discover if you could have an ISDN line is to call the telephone company. There are usually two stages of qualification to determine if ISDN is available at your location. The first stage is to verify that your serving central office, which provides telephone service to your locations, has ISDN capability.

The second stage is to determine if your local loop is qualified. This loop is the connection from the Central Office to your home. If you live more than three miles from the central office, you may not qualify, but you may still be able to make special arrangements with the phone company to get the line. It really depends on how much you are willing to pay.

The price varies depending on issues such as the configuration you select, the minimum service period that you select, and the state in which you are ordering the service.

In my area, a Flat Rate Pricing Plan allows for unlimited local usage per DSL Pipe per month, with the installation charge running around $200.00, and the monthly fee is a little over $80.00 per month. The minimum service plan is three months. That's about as basic as it gets.

It's expensive, but if you have no other options, and really want more than standard dial-up, ISDN may be your only choice. It's either that, or like, move.

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
June 20, 2003 7:03:48 PM

So if a new driver for a 56k modem doesn't really improve performace what does it do then?
June 20, 2003 7:56:33 PM

Sometimes it can enable features that an older driver doesn't support (very rarely), or it might allow the system to boot a little quicker, if the driver is smaller and more efficiently written. But honestly, it usually makes little difference, and rarely affects the performance. I normally allow Windows to install the default driver when the modem is identified, and leave it at that. If the modem is functional afterwards, and the timed downloads are within what I expect from a standard modem, then that's the end of it. If I want to get the best performance, I tweak the TCP/IP stack and edit some Registry settings. But afterwards, I do not recall ever seeing a drastic change in the performance of the device ... most of the information posted about this is just to make the user feel like he/she has accomplished something, IMHO. Let's face it; there's not much difference between downloading at 5K and 5.2K. The tweaks might help with dropped connections when downloading due to slightly increased efficiency within the OS, but that's about all.

<A HREF="http://www.tweak3d.net/tweak/modem/" target="_new">Win9x Modem Tweak Guide</A>

Heck, I used to install Lucent drivers with U.S. Robotics modems, and got perfectly acceptable performance, although the handshake protocol connection speed number was usually something strange, like 115,200. But that matters very little, as the handshake continues as long as the modem is connected, and isn't set in stone. You might connect online and see 52,000, or 54,200, etc ... but that's just the initial connection speed, and continues to vary. The amount of time it takes to get a download (of a decent length, for testing) is the only way to validate the performance of a device, and determine the average, overall Kb per second speed. Everything else just clouds the issue.

If you really want the modem to run somewhat better, looking around for firmware updates is probably your best bet. But that won't be an easy thing to find, so I wish you the best of luck.

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
June 21, 2003 12:23:17 AM

What do you mean by "firmware updates". What exactly is that?
June 21, 2003 12:43:34 AM

Dial-up modems use a small BIOS (called "firmware") to handle all of the modem's operations. In most cases, the firmware is recorded on a "flash" ROM chip that can easily be reprogrammed. Firmware updates are typically released to fix bugs, correct compatibility issues, and improve modem performance.

However, the firmware for the modem must be made <i>specifically</i> for the brand and model of the modem (no ifs, ands or buts), or you can render it permanently useless.

Firmware updates are also usually available for optical devices like a CD-ROM, CD Recordable/Writable Drives (DVD Players and Writers, too) and sometimes even for certain hard drives ... the IBM Deskstar 75GXP being one that comes to mind. Boy, did <i>that</i> model of hard drive really need a firmware update.

A good place to begin the hunt for modem firmware is <A HREF="http://www.56k.com/links/Firmware_Updates/" target="_new">56K.com</A>.

If you can actually find the correct firmware, this is the best, (and perhaps the only way) that you really might be able to increase the performance of the device to a certain degree. I make no promises, but this is your best shot. If it turns out to be impossible to find, you'll just have to either live with what you've got, or replace the modem with a device that has better online support, and easily accessible drivers and firmware, like the modem I mentioned to you in one of my previous posts on the subject.

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
June 21, 2003 2:07:15 AM

Dam man - I hope like hell that I never get caught between Toejam31, Crash & a dumb question again ...

But Officer, I wasn't speeding - I was qualifying ...
June 21, 2003 3:36:31 AM

At least it's an educational experience, if nothing else. :wink:

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
June 21, 2003 4:07:49 AM

Jake_Barnes:

Are you saying that my questions are dumb???
June 21, 2003 4:45:48 AM

no offence intended - but read it however you like.

But Officer, I wasn't speeding - I was qualifying ...
<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Jake_Barnes on 06/21/03 00:48 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
June 21, 2003 4:51:30 AM

Now, now ... leave Jake alone. He was just making a rhetorical, satirical comment, and it didn't mean anything. It was meant as a joke of sorts ... and he didn't send it to you; he sent it to me. I understood what he meant ... you didn't.

If you are going to hang out on a message board, developing a thicker skin would be a handy asset. Don't be so quick to leap all over someone, simply because you might detect a tone that you don't approve of. It's a typical newbie mistake, and the faster you get past it, the better will be your online experience.

That's my advice, take it or leave it. It's meant to be a kindly admonishment, and not a serious critique of your personality, you understand. But you'd be wise to give it some thought, IMHO.

Lots of questions can be considered "dumb", especially to someone who has years of experience, but that doesn't mean they won't be answered. I respond to posts everyday that have simple questions, most of which are easily answered, or might be just as easily be located by the individual user with a proper search engine, without my direct intervention. But that doesn't change the fact that the user doesn't have the info, and may not have any idea of how to begin to locate what is needed.

Some questions <i>are</i> intelligent, intuitive, and require much thought before an answer is given. Others are not. Much of that depends on the user's skill level, and the ability to gain comprehension of the subject matter after a certain amount of study.

Your personal ability to recognize whether your questions fall into one of those categories (or somewhere in between) depends on whether you understand <i>how</i> to ask insightful questions in general, regardless of the subject being discussed. The better the question, generally, the more useful the answer. In other words, if you want to pick someone's brain for nuggets of wisdom; sharpen your pick.

Newer users often have "dull picks", and this is why I often end up typing novellas instead of making what is considered an ordinary post. I try to anticipate the questions before they get asked, since the user didn't know to ask them in the first place.

Toey

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new"><font color=green>My System Rigs</font color=green></A>
___________________________________________

<A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/" target="_new"><b><font color=purple>BTVILLARIN.com</font color=purple></b></A> - <i><font color=orange>Your Computer Questions Answered</font color=orange></i>
June 21, 2003 6:34:50 AM

Honestly Zemuron - I ment no offence. Your question had a good nexus - I have asked elementary questions here (thanks Toey for not slamin me) - this is a good place for tech help - I apologise if I came across as an a**. I hope you find your solution.

But Officer, I wasn't speeding - I was qualifying ...
June 21, 2003 6:39:01 AM

Let me be the first to appologize for my rude outburst after reading and aswering your questions only 4 times in 3 other posts. I should learn to be more patient and quit taking people's doubt of my advice as an insult to my integrity.

Well, from that list, it can't be #2 or #3 since those are non-Rockwell modems. So it has to be either #1 or #4. Probably #4. You should download the drivers for both #1 and #4 and see which one works. I'd suggest you try #4 first.

<font color=blue>Watts mean squat if you don't have quality!</font color=blue>
June 21, 2003 7:51:11 AM

I made a mistake. In the 4 drivers I mentioned there was only one that can be installed in windows xp. I have windows xp so that's the one I dowloaded and installed.

Also some of you guys mentioned that I have a conexant/rockwell modem. Then others said it's a diamond modem. It says Diamond on my modem. So it's not a conexant/rockwell modem right?
June 21, 2003 1:26:40 PM

Diamond is the brand name (e.g Asus, Abit etc) and Conexant/rockwell is the chipset (e.g Geforce 4, Radeon 9500 etc). Now do you see the difference Conexant only make the chip, Diamond make the PCB and market the product.

<A HREF="http://service.futuremark.com/compare?2k1=5467618 " target="_new">Almost Breaking 12k!!</A>
June 21, 2003 1:35:09 PM

When you took the modem out of your case (I assume you did this, right (it's a long winded, repetitious thread, so excuse me for bypassing any details)). There may not be a plastic cover to some chips, or there could be - if the latter, then remove the cover to reveal the chips.

You will most likely see a large (approx 1" square) chip with Conexant or Rockwell on it. You may also see another chip with such names. Could you detail what it says on those chips? Ideally, place the modem on a scanner and scan with a high resolution and make the image available for us to see.

I appreciate you being honest about your disability. If need be, ask a friend to remove the modem for you. Don't worry about time...does it looks like this forum is going to die? :smile: It's not rocket science, but can be awkward sometimes.

<font color=orange><b>Some people don't realise that a mere two hours backing up their data is far quicker than redoing all the work again!</b></font color=orange>
June 21, 2003 3:41:41 PM

It's both, like one guy said Connexant/Rockwell doesn't make modems, they make modem controllers (chips). Even your driver (#4) said Diamond Supra and Roxwell chipset.

<font color=blue>Watts mean squat if you don't have quality!</font color=blue>
June 21, 2003 8:44:25 PM

So correct me if I'm wrong.

The same modem can have a diamond driver and a rockwell/conexant driver?

If I'm wrong read below. If I'm right don't read below.

In this link for firmware updates: http://www.56k.com/links/Firmware_Updates/.

We can choose "Conexant Systems" updates and also "Diamond Multimedia/Supra" and "Diamond Multimedia/Supra BETA firmware" updates . Are those all the same updates. I don't understand.

The "Diamond Multimedia/Supra" the "Diamond Multimedia/Supra BETA firmware and the "Conexant Systems" would be the same updates right?

If I'm right why insn't the "Diamond Multimedia/Supra" and "Diamond Multimedia/Supra BETA firmware" included in the "Conexant Systems" update. Wouldn't it be less confusing this way? Because there's no such thing as diamond firmware updates right? Those 2 diamond update is actually for chips called for example rockwell/conexant if that would be my case. Am I right or wrong?
June 21, 2003 11:17:27 PM

Generic drivers/firmware work on many, but not all modems. The stuff labled Connexant/Rockwell is like a generic version for any modem that uses that chip.

Stuff for Diamond modems is written specifically for Diamond's modems and noone elses.

Beta means that it hasn't finished final testing.

<font color=blue>Watts mean squat if you don't have quality!</font color=blue>
June 22, 2003 1:32:19 AM

Why would someone want to use a generic driver and not the one writtin specificly for the modem?
June 22, 2003 2:17:21 AM

There are other modem companies that refuse to offer support for their product, and companies that go out of business, and companies that offer OEM support (for the builder) only, etc. Sometimes you have to use generic stuff because you can't find one written specifically for your part.

<font color=blue>Watts mean squat if you don't have quality!</font color=blue>
June 23, 2003 7:50:11 AM

I'm not sure if there's going to be a firmware update for my modem though. I don't want to search for nothing.

1. Is a firmware update available for every 56k winmodem?

2. Does the firmware update replace the driver? Or is it 2 seperate updates for the same 56k winmodem?

Also do Diamond 56k winmodems alwas have Conexant/Rockwell chips?
<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Zemuron on 06/23/03 03:54 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
June 23, 2003 3:22:32 PM

1) It's rare to find a firmware update for modems. Needless to say, they are more common for external modems than internal modems.

2) Normally firmware updates are seperate to drivers. Typically, a firmware controls the behaviour of a piece of hardware. This is because the firmware contains the software for the processor, built into the hardware, to run. The driver will control how the hardware will communicate with the rest of the computer.

Tell me, what "tweaks", if any, have you made to try to boost your modem's speed? Have you noticed any speed increase? Do you have any evidence to support these speed increases?

You're likely to gain almost ½K/sec extra, and little more. The quality, length and age of the phone-line can decrease a modem's performance significantly.

Simply running a brand new cable straight from your computer to the telephone outlet can make all the difference! Avoid electrical cables where possible, and if you can get hold of some, get one or two ferrite rings (these absorb electrical interference, hence providing better line conditions) and place them 6" from either end of the plugs on the modem cable - and on the new phone-line if possible!

I realise you're likely to be incapable of running a new extension, but I'm trying to illustrate the fact that replacing an aged cable can make more difference than a firmware/driver update!

<font color=orange><b>Some people don't realise that a mere two hours backing up their data is far quicker than redoing all the work again!</b></font color=orange>
June 23, 2003 9:34:23 PM

Ok so is this what you mean? Let's say that my download's speed is 4.0k/sec. Are you saying that my download speed will maybe only increase of half a 1k/sec or alittle more? So if .5k/sec is half of 1k/sec it will increase to 4.5k/sec?

If this is what you mean. Well then I don't think it's worth it. So i'll just stay with the speed I got now until I change to high speed.

Plus if I'm correct will this tiny increase of speed help me alittle for online games? I'm not even sure if what your telling me to do will help me with my online games.

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Zemuron on 06/23/03 05:36 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
June 23, 2003 10:33:35 PM

Look at your driver list, it shows Diamond modems with several chips (Rockwell/Connexant, Lucent, etc).

Anyway, a firmware update might allow the modem to support a new feature, but you still need the driver. And if the driver doesn't support that feature, you either can't use the feature or need to modify the driver. I've never flashed a modem because I really can't see the point.

<font color=blue>Watts mean squat if you don't have quality!</font color=blue>
June 23, 2003 10:41:54 PM

OH, almost forgot the first question! No, most modems don't even use firmware. Firmware is for hardware modems, and hardware based "winmodems". Remember a month ago when I told you that not all "softmodems" were actually software, and not all winmodems were software?

Various modems rely on the CPU to do various functions. The fewer functions done by the modem, the more done by the CPU. This is the reason why certain modems have low system requirements (such as Pentium 90 or faster CPU) and others have more stringent requirements (such as Pentium II 300 or faster CPU). The ones with the lowest system requirements are the ones with the most hardware, thus offering improved system performance.

The best hardware based winmodems are probably the Rockwells and the Lucent 1646T00 chipset modems. USR also makes some fairly decent hardware based "softmodems".

The worst modems are nothing more than a codec (an interface for the CPU, where the CPU does 100% of the work), and thus have higher requirments.

You have one of the better modems, but I can't even say if it uses firmware or not.

<font color=blue>Watts mean squat if you don't have quality!</font color=blue>
June 25, 2003 12:48:59 AM

Can someone please answer my last question? It doesn't have to be Basmic.

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Zemuron on 06/24/03 08:49 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
June 25, 2003 1:48:56 AM

I already answered your question:
1.) No
2.) No

3.) No

I gave you better answers than that, but it appears you can't read more than one word answers.

<font color=blue>Watts mean squat if you don't have quality!</font color=blue>
June 25, 2003 2:31:33 AM

Crash - This is surely the thread from hell. And you have the patience of god.

But Officer, I wasn't speeding - I was qualifying ...
June 25, 2003 8:11:42 AM

Crashman is the forum for you working properly? Did you get my last questions? Because that wasn't my last questions.

But maybe the forum is not working properly for me.

Anyways you answered these questions:

"I'm not sure if there's going to be a firmware update for my modem though. I don't want to search for nothing.

1. Is a firmware update available for every 56k winmodem?

2. Does the firmware update replace the driver? Or is it 2 seperate updates for the same 56k winmodem?

Also do Diamond 56k winmodems alwas have Conexant/Rockwell chips?


Edited by Zemuron on 06/23/03 03:54 AM."

But these are not my last questions. These are my last questions:

" Ok so is this what you mean? Let's say that my download's speed is 4.0k/sec. Are you saying that my download speed will maybe only increase of half a 1k/sec or alittle more? So if .5k/sec is half of 1k/sec it will increase to 4.5k/sec?

If this is what you mean. Well then I don't think it's worth it. So i'll just stay with the speed I got now until I change to high speed.

Plus if I'm correct will this tiny increase of speed help me alittle for online games? I'm not even sure if what your telling me to do will help me with my online games.



Edited by Zemuron on 06/23/03 05:36 PM."

It was really for Basmic but if someone else knows the answer, please tell me.
June 25, 2003 10:07:16 PM

Quote:

" Ok so is this what you mean? Let's say that my download's speed is 4.0k/sec. Are you saying that my download speed will maybe only increase of half a 1k/sec or alittle more? So if .5k/sec is half of 1k/sec it will increase to 4.5k/sec?

If this is what you mean. Well then I don't think it's worth it. So i'll just stay with the speed I got now until I change to high speed.

Plus if I'm correct will this tiny increase of speed help me alittle for online games? I'm not even sure if what your telling me to do will help me with my online games.

With online games, there is major contributor to your end game-play: ping response time. As a 56K user, there is extremely little you can do to better the ping time. A ping is how long it takes for a reply from the server you send a packet of data to. Read <A HREF="http://www.dslreports.com/faq/695" target="_new">this</A> guide for information on how to find your optimal MTU.

The future is broadband. Multiplayer games exchange so much data these days, you really have little choice but to use a broadband connection. It's sort of like putting the engine of an old mini in a new mini - ineffecient, slow and awful to use!

I am not saying you are wasting your time attempting to tweak your modem settings. I am suggesting that there MANY other factors, such as bad/aged phone-lines, interference, Tiddles the cat chewing the cable, bad connection made between sockets and plugs.....and more!

It might be worth your while getting a modem which is good at handling bad line conditions, and get a decent 5-5.5K/sec from your modem. But don't expect any more than 5.5K/sec! If you think you're going to get say 6-7K/sec, constantly, then I really think you're kidding yourself!

Anyhow, don't be put off tweaking your modem settings. Use Google.com, and you will find LOADS of guides on tweaking modems. But at the end of this topic, and I would really like to see some before/after results!

I'm going to try and find some general tweak guides for you, so keep reading the next day or two!

<font color=orange><b> :smile: I guess THG is a drug in it's own way, and potentially harmfull! :smile: </b></font color=orange>
June 25, 2003 10:11:43 PM

Found <A HREF="http://www.tweak3d.net/tweak/modem/" target="_new">this</A> and covers almost every aspect of tweakng! :smile:

Have fun!

<font color=orange><b> :smile: I guess THG is a drug in it's own way, and potentially harmfull! :smile: </b></font color=orange>
June 25, 2003 10:15:55 PM

Thanx
June 25, 2003 10:17:18 PM

Realistically, the problem with online gaming by modem is your ping response time, as mentioned by basmic. I believe that has more to do with your ISP and telco than your modem.

<font color=blue>Watts mean squat if you don't have quality!</font color=blue>
June 25, 2003 10:20:39 PM

I know what isp means (internet service provider). But I'm not sure what you mean by telco Crash. Can you please give me an idea of what it is?

OHHHHHH I just figured it out maybe. Does it stand for Telephone Company?

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Zemuron on 06/25/03 06:22 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
!