Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

My Computer BSOD's every other time it starts up. What can I do?

Last response: in Windows 7
Share
July 5, 2012 1:05:30 AM

Dunno if this belongs in this forum, but If it doesn't, I'm sure a moderator could move it into the appropriate one :D 

So lately, every morning I will wake up and turn on my computer, put in my password and then go eat breakfast. After I eat, I will come back to my computer either at the log-in screen (meaning it BSOD'd and restarted) or have a BSOD up. The three error messages I get are:

BAD_POOL_HEADER

SYSTEM_SERVICE_EXCEPTION

IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL

I built my computer back in early December, and now my parents are mad at me because they think my computer is busted. After it BSODs, I'll restart it and everything will load fine and my computer will work fine for the rest of the day, but whenever I start it up after that it will BSOD again and then the pattern continues...

I use an Asus P8P67 PRO (REV 3.1) Motherboard with an i5-2500k. (I can give you guys full specs if you need them)

I use the stock CPU cooler but plan on getting a Hyper 212+ soon.

What information do you guys need to know in order to help me with this? If I need to show you guys certain files, you'll have to give me the paths to them, and I can get you guys an msinfo32 report if you want.

Also, I won't be on tonight, I'm posting this right before I shut my computer down, so post your responses and I'll look over them in the morning.

Thanks!

Also, a friend recommended I show you guys this: http://i.imgur.com/qm3CB.png?1
July 5, 2012 1:32:35 AM

A few questions:
1. Has anything changed in your system since the BSOD's started?
2. Is your CPU overclocked?
3. What GPU do you have?
4. What PSU do you have?
a b $ Windows 7
July 5, 2012 1:48:18 AM

The errors all point to memory problems, try downloading memtest86 and run for at least three passes. Also try running the computer with only one stick of memory one at a time. The problem could also be caused by a faulty power supply, substitution is the only reliable test.
Related resources
July 5, 2012 11:49:12 AM

avenseth12 said:
A few questions:
1. Has anything changed in your system since the BSOD's started?
2. Is your CPU overclocked?
3. What GPU do you have?
4. What PSU do you have?


Nothing's changed in the hardware sine the BSOD's started, no.
I don't overclock my CPU, haven't tried (especially since I'm using the stock cooler)
I use an EVGA 560 Ti 2GB GPU
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
^That's the power supply I use^

Also, the BSOD's didn't start up until pretty recently, so I'm not sure if it's a power supply problem, but I don't know.
July 5, 2012 12:21:04 PM

Make yourself a memtest bootable CD (iso from www.memtest86.com or www.memtest.org...the 1st one is newer). Now leave it in your drive and setup BIOS to boot from it before HDD/SSD. That way the next morning you won't forget to run memtest (I lost a week because I kept forgetting). See what kind of errors it find and (if not many) see if there is a pattern between days.

I've had a C2D MB that had a similar problem and I had 1 bit error. It was same address+pattern every time, regardless of which slot was in and it persisted with the replacement memory also. No matter how much did I run memtest, it was detected only at 1st run after a cold night+work day and just once.
July 5, 2012 12:21:19 PM

pjmelect said:
The errors all point to memory problems, try downloading memtest86 and run for at least three passes. Also try running the computer with only one stick of memory one at a time. The problem could also be caused by a faulty power supply, substitution is the only reliable test.

I'll download memtest86 and see what I can do.

Yesterday, a friend told me that sometimes startup programs can interfere with my computer, so I removed some that he suggested from the startup list. My computer didn't BSOD today, but I dunno if it's fixed or not. If it BSOD's tomorrow when I boot it up, I'll do a few scans with memtest86.
July 5, 2012 12:25:44 PM

mathew7 said:
Make yourself a memtest bootable CD (iso from www.memtest86.com or www.memtest.org...the 1st one is newer). Now leave it in your drive and setup BIOS to boot from it before HDD/SSD. That way the next morning you won't forget to run memtest (I lost a week because I kept forgetting). See what kind of errors it find and (if not many) see if there is a pattern between days.

I've had a C2D MB that had a similar problem and I had 1 bit error. It was same address+pattern every time, regardless of which slot was in and it persisted with the replacement memory also. No matter how much did I run memtest, it was detected only at 1st run after a cold night+work day and just once.


Can I just make a bootable CD by copying the ISO onto a writable CD? Not really sure how it works haha
a b $ Windows 7
July 5, 2012 11:13:17 PM

Quote:

Can I just make a bootable CD by copying the ISO onto a writable CD? Not really sure how it works haha


No you can't, To create a boot-able CD-ROM use your CD burning software to create an image from the un-zipped ISO file. Be sure to use a "create from image option." Do NOT simply copy the file to a CD.
!