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DAT IDs via S/PDIF

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Anonymous
May 20, 2005 8:16:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

A well-known re-issue company has for the last 20 years archived all
its original analog sources to DAT, with a start ID a few seconds
before each title. It's now my job to organise the transfer of nearly
200,000 titles from more than 5,000 DAT tapes to their new
high-capacity audio server in the form of one 16bit WAV file for each
title. So ideally I need:

(a - the easy bit...) hardware in the form of motherboard-integrated or
PCI or firewire or PCMCIA or USB interface, with an S/PDIF input that
can read the DAT IDs embedded in the data stream. Must pass the audio
straight through at 44k1 or 48k without any of that ridiculous Creative
Sound Blaster built-in hardware re-sampling malarky. Don't know if
current mobos with optical/co-ax I/O can see the extra ID and/or error
status bits.

(b - the elusive bit...) simple audio editing software that can
interpret the incoming IDs and (at least) put a marker or cut in the
playlist it creates as it dumps the audio to disc, or ideally, start a
new sequentially numbered file in the format <DATname+ID#>.wav .

The only combination I know of that would do this is SADiE up to v.4
(latest non-SCSI SADiEs can't see S/PDIF status bits for hardware chip
reasons), but I'm put off by the need to have a great clumsy SADiE PC
roaring away in the room, with the problem of getting the audio from
the SADiE SCSI disks to the server's system. And SADiE only puts cuts
at DAT IDs, so each clip created would have to be manually bounced to
its own file as there's no scripting. So this solution is far from
ideal.

Anybody out there know of any hardware/software that would do the job???

More about : dat ids pdif

Anonymous
May 20, 2005 11:31:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I am not a big user of dat but I do know that most of the standalong
audio CD burners (e.g. the marantz ones) will record straight from DAT
and mark track points via the spdif but that would be an intermediarly
step because you would hvae to record them to the CD then import them
to the computer in wave format.

Mike http://www.mmeproductions.com


heapug wrote:
> A well-known re-issue company has for the last 20 years archived all
> its original analog sources to DAT, with a start ID a few seconds
> before each title. It's now my job to organise the transfer of
nearly
> 200,000 titles from more than 5,000 DAT tapes to their new
> high-capacity audio server in the form of one 16bit WAV file for each
> title. So ideally I need:
>
> (a - the easy bit...) hardware in the form of motherboard-integrated
or
> PCI or firewire or PCMCIA or USB interface, with an S/PDIF input that
> can read the DAT IDs embedded in the data stream. Must pass the audio
> straight through at 44k1 or 48k without any of that ridiculous
Creative
> Sound Blaster built-in hardware re-sampling malarky. Don't know if
> current mobos with optical/co-ax I/O can see the extra ID and/or
error
> status bits.
>
> (b - the elusive bit...) simple audio editing software that can
> interpret the incoming IDs and (at least) put a marker or cut in the
> playlist it creates as it dumps the audio to disc, or ideally, start
a
> new sequentially numbered file in the format <DATname+ID#>.wav .
>
> The only combination I know of that would do this is SADiE up to v.4
> (latest non-SCSI SADiEs can't see S/PDIF status bits for hardware
chip
> reasons), but I'm put off by the need to have a great clumsy SADiE PC
> roaring away in the room, with the problem of getting the audio from
> the SADiE SCSI disks to the server's system. And SADiE only puts cuts
> at DAT IDs, so each clip created would have to be manually bounced to
> its own file as there's no scripting. So this solution is far from
> ideal.
>
> Anybody out there know of any hardware/software that would do the
job???
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 12:47:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

heapug wrote:
>
> (a - the easy bit...) hardware in the form of motherboard-integrated or
> PCI or firewire or PCMCIA or USB interface, with an S/PDIF input that
> can read the DAT IDs embedded in the data stream. Must pass the audio
> straight through at 44k1 or 48k without any of that ridiculous Creative
> Sound Blaster built-in hardware re-sampling malarky.

Many of the RME cards do this (they call it TMS, for Track Marker Support.)



> (b - the elusive bit...) simple audio editing software that can
> interpret the incoming IDs and (at least) put a marker or cut in the
> playlist it creates as it dumps the audio to disc, or ideally, start a
> new sequentially numbered file in the format <DATname+ID#>.wav

Samplitude or Wavelab.
Related resources
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 3:03:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Ingo, many thans for v. helpful suggestions. I don't have Samplitude,
but I have a colleague who uses Sequoia for classical editing - that
might well inherit the capabilities you mention from Samplitude, so
ASAP I'll check it out. I may well come back to you for the 'more
details' you offer - thanks again.
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 3:08:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks James - yes I need the ID positions, because the sequentially
numbered files I create must correspond to the DAT ID #
cross-referenced to the title in the record company's database - 6 IDs
might just be 6 falses starts in a session. I''ve never heard of
CDWave, so it would have to be able to split at the IDs.
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 3:11:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks Mike - burn CD intermediates not an option because most of our
DAT masters are 48K & can't have naff SRC interposed - but thanks for
replying.
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 6:00:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 20 May 2005 04:16:37 -0700, heapug <adam@soundmastering.com> wrote:

> A well-known re-issue company has for the last 20 years archived all
> its original analog sources to DAT, with a start ID a few seconds
> before each title. It's now my job to organise the transfer of nearly
> 200,000 titles from more than 5,000 DAT tapes to their new
> high-capacity audio server in the form of one 16bit WAV file for each
> title. So ideally I need:
>
> (a - the easy bit...) hardware in the form of motherboard-integrated or
> PCI or firewire or PCMCIA or USB interface, with an S/PDIF input that
> can read the DAT IDs embedded in the data stream. Must pass the audio
> straight through at 44k1 or 48k without any of that ridiculous Creative
> Sound Blaster built-in hardware re-sampling malarky. Don't know if
> current mobos with optical/co-ax I/O can see the extra ID and/or error
> status bits.
>
> (b - the elusive bit...) simple audio editing software that can
> interpret the incoming IDs and (at least) put a marker or cut in the
> playlist it creates as it dumps the audio to disc, or ideally, start a
> new sequentially numbered file in the format <DATname+ID#>.wav .
>

The Zefiro ZA2 card could read start ID's from the spdif stream and write
them to a cue file while it wrote the audio to a single large file. You
could then use something like CDWave to read the cue file and split it
into smaller files.

The ZA2 is an old ISA bus card and the supporting software was DOS based
(although it had Windows drivers as well) so you'll need to find the right
computer for it. I believe that you can also get hold of the source code
to the software which would allow you to modify it to do exactly what you
want.

I don't know of any more modern suggestions.

Is it vital to keep the start ID positions? If not then you can split
files very quickly with tools like CDWave just by pointing, listening and
clicking.

Cheers.

James.
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 6:15:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>A well-known re-issue company has for the last 20 years archived all
> its original analog sources to DAT, with a start ID a few seconds
> before each title. It's now my job to organise the transfer of nearly
> 200,000 titles from more than 5,000 DAT tapes to their new
> high-capacity audio server in the form of one 16bit WAV file for each
> title. So ideally I need:
>
> (a - the easy bit...) hardware in the form of motherboard-integrated or
> PCI or firewire or PCMCIA or USB interface, with an S/PDIF input that
> can read the DAT IDs embedded in the data stream. Must pass the audio
> straight through at 44k1 or 48k without any of that ridiculous Creative
> Sound Blaster built-in hardware re-sampling malarky. Don't know if
> current mobos with optical/co-ax I/O can see the extra ID and/or error
> status bits.
>
> (b - the elusive bit...) simple audio editing software that can
> interpret the incoming IDs and (at least) put a marker or cut in the
> playlist it creates as it dumps the audio to disc, or ideally, start a
> new sequentially numbered file in the format <DATname+ID#>.wav .
>
> The only combination I know of that would do this is SADiE up to v.4
> (latest non-SCSI SADiEs can't see S/PDIF status bits for hardware chip
> reasons), but I'm put off by the need to have a great clumsy SADiE PC
> roaring away in the room, with the problem of getting the audio from
> the SADiE SCSI disks to the server's system. And SADiE only puts cuts
> at DAT IDs, so each clip created would have to be manually bounced to
> its own file as there's no scripting. So this solution is far from
> ideal.
>
> Anybody out there know of any hardware/software that would do the job???


a) use rme-soundcards (or "marian" soundcards, but...), they pass the
DAT-IDs; error status bits in S/PDIF are not enough: no error rate, no
interpolation error info...
What kind of DAT recorder do you use?
b) use samplitude (any cheap version will suffice)
(- do a record including the IDs
- split object at IDs (one simple command)
- set CD-Track-IDs at object edges (one simple command)
- export Audio to seperate files (one simple command)
)
conclusion: quite easy and it works (I just tried it).
-> all of the above steps could easily be automated using Macro-recorders
etc

Want to know more details? Please ask!
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 6:35:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Sequoia is the fancier version of Samplitude..... The DAT track marker
feature is the same as Samplitude....

Rgds:
Eric Weber

"heapug" <adam@soundmastering.com> wrotein message
news:1116612213.801955.252140@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Ingo, many thans for v. helpful suggestions. I don't have Samplitude,
> but I have a colleague who uses Sequoia for classical editing - that
> might well inherit the capabilities you mention from Samplitude, so
> ASAP I'll check it out. I may well come back to you for the 'more
> details' you offer - thanks again.
>
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 10:25:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

transmogrifa wrote:

> I am not a big user of dat but I do know that most of the standalong
> audio CD burners (e.g. the marantz ones) will record straight from DAT
> and mark track points via the spdif but that would be an intermediarly
> step because you would hvae to record them to the CD then import them
> to the computer in wave format.

If one were to output from the CD burner's digital out while recording
from the DAT source, would the ID's pass to storage other than the CDR
itself?

--
ha
!