TEAC A-3440 Last Production Year ???

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hello,

Does anyone know the LAST time the A-3440 (not to be confused with the 3340
which is older) was manufactured ?

Thanks so much!

Daniel
16 answers Last reply
More about teac 3440 production year
  1. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    my records show 1979 - 1983 $1,199 list
    nice unit - I use it with an Ampex remote (I also have
    an Ampex ATR700 that uses a TEAC remote)
    Teac make the machine for Ampex.
    it was a time of transition for Teac (who bought Tascam in 1974).
    they finally dropped the Teac line of open reel units
    and produced only tascam - last of the great teacs
    was te 40-4 (which has tascam written all over it) -
    and was also available as the tascam 44
    but that was more than you really wanted to know - wasn't it :-)
  2. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "bbrent" <bbrent@pipeline.com> wrote in message
    news:1117164565.923101.260850@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
    > my records show 1979 - 1983 $1,199 list
    > nice unit - I use it with an Ampex remote (I also have
    > an Ampex ATR700 that uses a TEAC remote)
    > Teac make the machine for Ampex.
    > it was a time of transition for Teac (who bought Tascam in 1974).
    > they finally dropped the Teac line of open reel units
    > and produced only tascam - last of the great teacs
    > was te 40-4 (which has tascam written all over it) -
    > and was also available as the tascam 44
    > but that was more than you really wanted to know - wasn't it :-)

    Still, great info! Thanks very much my friend!

    I love the TEAC 3440. I actually have 2!! Both still play and record
    beautifully and look quite striking to say the least. I also have the TASCAM
    388 studio 8 and a TASCAM M-30 mixer, an RE15 mic, a dbx 118 compressor and
    a bunch of other stuff I picked up second hand, including lotsa Maxell UD 35
    tapes! All of my gear received a handful of hrs from its previous owners who
    dumped the gear for pennies. Too bad stuff like this isn't made anymore
    ......

    The last 3440 I picked up had some sealed Ampex 641 tapes ... I wonder if
    these would be bias compatible with my 3440 ??

    ~Daniel
  3. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    >
    > As I recall, my 3340 would not bias up to the later high bias tapes. Where's
    > the 641? That wasn't one of the high bias tapes was it?
    >
    > Ty

    Way off-topic, but - you mention the Teac 3340. Geez, I loved my 3340.
    It got me into multitrack recording in 1972 at a time when it was hard
    to break-in. I was thrilled to have as many tracks as the Beatles had
    1963-1968. Not the best machine, but very reliable and easy to use. And
    I am still amazed at how good my 1972 4-track 15ips tapes sound today,
    as I dub them onto DAWs, my 2488 or ADATs and add fresh overdubs, more
    than 30 years later!

    It's probably hard for newbies to understand how limited things were
    then for recordists, and how we old duffers had to improvise. But it
    was a golden era and I had a lot of fun.
  4. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    In article <1117164565.923101.260850@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com> bbrent@pipeline.com writes:

    > it was a time of transition for Teac (who bought Tascam in 1974).
    > they finally dropped the Teac line of open reel units
    > and produced only tascam - last of the great teacs
    > was te 40-4 (which has tascam written all over it) -
    > and was also available as the tascam 44

    TASCAM was always TEAC. In fact, the T in TASCAM stands for TEAC
    (which in turn stands for Technical Electric Audio Corporation). I
    can't remember what the rest of TASCAM stands for. Neither one bought
    the other. TEAC brought out the TASCAM line when they realized, with
    the encouragement of Dick Rosmini, that their 4-channel consumer
    equipment could be used by musicians as an alternative to professoinal
    studio equipment.

    The 40-4 was the TASCAM version of the 3440 and the 44 was an updated
    series.

    That's much more than anyone needs to know.

    --
    I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
    However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
    lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
    you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
    and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
  5. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Daniel <NotReal@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >The last 3440 I picked up had some sealed Ampex 641 tapes ... I wonder if
    >these would be bias compatible with my 3440 ??

    I think the 3440 is intended for use with JIS tapes. 641 is a red oxide
    tape with a lower bias, but I would not be surprised if the bias control
    inside had enough range that you could line it up. Try it and see... if
    you can't find the peak, it's not the right tape. The Tascam machines
    tend to have very little range on the controls....
    --scott

    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  6. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Fri, 27 May 2005 05:10:30 -0400, Daniel wrote
    (in article <auBle.1493665$6l.515889@pd7tw2no>):

    >
    > "bbrent" <bbrent@pipeline.com> wrote in message
    > news:1117164565.923101.260850@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
    >> my records show 1979 - 1983 $1,199 list
    >> nice unit - I use it with an Ampex remote (I also have
    >> an Ampex ATR700 that uses a TEAC remote)
    >> Teac make the machine for Ampex.
    >> it was a time of transition for Teac (who bought Tascam in 1974).
    >> they finally dropped the Teac line of open reel units
    >> and produced only tascam - last of the great teacs
    >> was te 40-4 (which has tascam written all over it) -
    >> and was also available as the tascam 44
    >> but that was more than you really wanted to know - wasn't it :-)
    >
    > Still, great info! Thanks very much my friend!
    >
    > I love the TEAC 3440. I actually have 2!! Both still play and record
    > beautifully and look quite striking to say the least. I also have the TASCAM
    > 388 studio 8 and a TASCAM M-30 mixer, an RE15 mic, a dbx 118 compressor and
    > a bunch of other stuff I picked up second hand, including lotsa Maxell UD 35
    > tapes! All of my gear received a handful of hrs from its previous owners who
    > dumped the gear for pennies. Too bad stuff like this isn't made anymore
    > .....
    >
    > The last 3440 I picked up had some sealed Ampex 641 tapes ... I wonder if
    > these would be bias compatible with my 3440 ??
    >
    >> Daniel
    >
    >

    As I recall, my 3340 would not bias up to the later high bias tapes. Where's
    the 641? That wasn't one of the high bias tapes was it?

    Ty

    -- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
    stuff are at www.tyford.com
  7. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    > As I recall, my 3340 would not bias up to the later high bias tapes. Where's
    > the 641? That wasn't one of the high bias tapes was it?

    641 is a 1950s vintage red oxide tape, that was still in production six
    months ago. It is lower than low bias..... 185 nw/m reference, bias
    for a broad peak at 1 KC rather than modern overbias method. Lower
    bias than HOLN tapes like Maxell UD.....
    --scott


    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  8. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On 27 May 2005 09:22:51 -0400, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers)
    wrote:

    >
    >In article <1117164565.923101.260850@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com> bbrent@pipeline.com writes:
    >
    >> it was a time of transition for Teac (who bought Tascam in 1974).
    >> they finally dropped the Teac line of open reel units
    >> and produced only tascam - last of the great teacs
    >> was te 40-4 (which has tascam written all over it) -
    >> and was also available as the tascam 44
    >
    snip>TEAC brought out the TASCAM line when they realized, with
    >the encouragement of Dick Rosmini, that their 4-channel consumer
    >equipment could be used by musicians as an alternative to professoinal
    >studio equipment.

    Dick was hired as a consultant by Larry Phillips. Their association
    went back to when Phillips was head of marketing @ JBL.
    >
    >The 40-4 was the TASCAM version of the 3440 and the 44 was an updated
    >series.

    Not quite. The 40-4 was a 1/4" 4-track version of the 80-8 1/2"
    8-track. The only physical differences between the 2 were the heads
    and guides.

    The 44 had better electronics and a built in vari-speed but the
    transport wasn't nearly as bullet-proof.


    Rick Ruskin
    Lion Dog Music - Seattle WA
    http://liondogmusic.com
  9. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Daniel wrote:

    > Still, great info! Thanks very much my friend!

    All except (for the historical record), TEAC didn't "buy"
    TASCAM. TEAC (Tokyo Electro-Acoustic Company) formed the
    TASCAM (TEAC Audio Systems Corporation of AMerica) division
    here in the US to establish a presence in the professional
    recording market, but what ultimately became the
    "semi-professional" recording market. The Model 10 mixing
    console and associated modules and accessories, and the
    series 70 recorders with both 501 and 701 electronics and in
    up to 1/2"-8-track configurations were the flagship
    products. When they were first introduced, my partner and I
    looked at several installations in Detroit, and visited a
    number of dealers in the Michiana area.

    TASCAM, at the time, certainly appeared to be quite a good
    value compared to the Ampexes and Scullys they were sitting
    next to. The complete story is written in the subsequent
    history.

    >
    > The last 3440 I picked up had some sealed Ampex 641 tapes ... I wonder if
    > these would be bias compatible with my 3440 ??

    Sure. Just re-bias the machine.


    TM
  10. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    >The 40-4 was the TASCAM version of the 3440 and the 44 was an updated
    >series.

    my 40-4 is a Teac - very similar to my 3440 - but no headphone jack -
    no variable pitch - but mine has the optional dbx unit on the bottom

    it looks something like this....
    http://www.angelfire.com/electronic2/vintagetx/TA110.jpg
  11. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    two different units - the 3340 was billed as a quadraphonic unit -
    though it was a true 4 track - and was really geared at the consumer
    market. The 3440 was aimed at more of the pro or semi pro musician,
    and was less friendly (because of the meter layout) to "quadraphonic"
    fans - who were a fast fading breed in those days.

    tracks 1, 2, 3, 4 equate to left front - left rear - right front -
    right rear
    most (not all) consumer decks line up the meters - 1, 3, 2, 4
    the 3340 had them stacked front on top, rear on bottom
    most pro models (not all) had the meteres lined up 1, 2, 3, 4
  12. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Ty Ford wrote:

    > As I recall, my 3340 would not bias up to the later high bias tapes. Where's
    > the 641? That wasn't one of the high bias tapes was it?

    But aren't they talking about a 3440, which I've never met? Or is this a
    typo? Kind of hard to think some folks are saying great things about
    3340's. I was given one of those in nearly new condition a few years
    ago.

    --
    ha
  13. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    On Sat, 28 May 2005 09:47:39 -0400, Ty Ford <tyreeford@comcast.net>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 27 May 2005 21:16:12 -0400, hank alrich wrote
    >(in article <1gx8fyi.q57bx71jmdk86N%walkinay@thegrid.net>):
    >
    >> Ty Ford wrote:
    >>
    >>> As I recall, my 3340 would not bias up to the later high bias tapes. Where's
    >>> the 641? That wasn't one of the high bias tapes was it?
    >>
    >> But aren't they talking about a 3440, which I've never met? Or is this a
    >> typo? Kind of hard to think some folks are saying great things about
    >> 3340's. I was given one of those in nearly new condition a few years
    >> ago.
    >>
    >> --
    >> ha
    >
    >My bad. What was a 3440?

    An impovement over the 3340 in every way. The transport was more
    robust, electronics much cleaner, and you could roll and punch without
    leaving punch marks.

    BTW- a 3340 could be set up for 456 but not at elevated levels.



    Rick Ruskin
    Lion Dog Music - Seattle WA
    http://liondogmusic.com
  14. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Wow! Didn't know that my seemingly innocent question would turn out many
    great and informative replies! I want to thank you guys!! Much appreciated!

    Btw, here's some pictures and specifications of the 3440 .. again not to be
    confused with a 3340 ... It's not my site or my picts but it is from a guy
    in Texas who restores these (when needed) and has a great all around
    service. Anyway, here's the link to the 3440:

    http://www.angelfire.com/electronic2/vintagetx/TeacA-3440.html

    Thanks again,

    Daniel
  15. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    <blackburst@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:1117210513.264391.279610@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...

    > And I am still amazed at how good my 1972 4-track 15ips tapes sound today,
    > as I dub them onto DAWs, my 2488 or ADATs and add fresh overdubs, more
    > than 30 years later!

    You mean the beast still works after more than 30 years!? WOW!! My 3440 is
    like 10 years younger so its good to know its got at least another 10 good
    years to go! ;)


    > It's probably hard for newbies to understand how limited things were
    > then for recordists, and how we old duffers had to improvise. But it
    > was a golden era and I had a lot of fun.

    I think those limitations forced one to be extremely creative and great
    demos came out of that. Plus, those machines were (are) so much fun to use
    ...

    ~Daniel
  16. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    Daniel wrote:
    > <blackburst@aol.com> wrote in message
    > news:1117210513.264391.279610@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    >
    > > And I am still amazed at how good my 1972 4-track 15ips tapes sound today,
    > > as I dub them onto DAWs, my 2488 or ADATs and add fresh overdubs, more
    > > than 30 years later!
    >
    > You mean the beast still works after more than 30 years!? WOW!! My 3440 is
    > like 10 years younger so its good to know its got at least another 10 good
    > years to go! ;)

    I kept it in pretty good shape and had it routinely serviced until I
    switched to 4-track cassette in about 1984, then stored it carefully. A
    couple of years later I got a Fostex 8-track then an ADAT a few years
    after that. And a 2488 recently.

    Age-old problem: If you keep your multitrack tapes, you have to keep
    the machine they were recorded on (or a similar machine). So I still
    have a 2340, a 3340, Yamaha MT1000, Fostex 80, ADAT-XT, and a host of
    mastering machines like an Otari MX-5050. It's insidious!
    >
    >
    > > It's probably hard for newbies to understand how limited things were
    > > then for recordists, and how we old duffers had to improvise. But it
    > > was a golden era and I had a lot of fun.
    >
    > I think those limitations forced one to be extremely creative and great
    > demos came out of that. Plus, those machines were (are) so much fun to use

    Yep that's always the case. My newer discrete tracks are better
    recorded, but there's an incredible feel to my old 4-tracks, with
    bouncedowns and all.

    And I still think this is bizarre: My careful cataloguing and
    dubbing-to-digital revealed lots of unfinished songs, and it is truly
    weird to be playing along and harmonizing with yourself THIRTY YEARS
    LATER!
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