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Possible Windows 7 OEM complications?

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  • Windows 7
  • OEM
  • Motherboards
Last response: in Windows 7
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July 9, 2012 6:27:51 PM

I would like to buy a OEM version of windows 7 from newegg and i read some threads on the forum about the OEM version, but i still have some questions about specific situations that may arise concerning my new pc and the OEM version.

1. Say for example my motherboard dies out on me or i wanna upgrade, because a new socket came out or something. Will i be able to call Microsoft or reactivate the OEM version online? Is there absolutely anyway to avoid having to purchase another OEM license, for example calling Microsoft and explaining that you want to upgrade or your motherboard died. Will they supply me with another key to reactivate on a new motherboard? (im more interesting in how to activate if im upgrading).

2. Can i change every part of the computer other than the motherboard without any issues? (this includes the hard drive)

3. Can I reinstall Windows on the same computer as many times as I want? For example, I got a virus or I just want to do a clean install.

4. What if my hard drive poops out on me or I want to add a second one or just replace the first one, will any issues arise?

5. If I do want to change my hard drive can i potentially use a cloning tool like WD's Acronis thingy to clone my hard drive onto another one?

6. Say i have a computer that has a hard drive that is actually a clone of another computer with a full version of windows, for example having the same key and all in all being the same computer, can i clone the already cloned hard drive again with another computer's hard drive albeit with different hardware?

(I'm sorry if this is in the wrong category or sub-category I didn't know where to put it, if it is in the wrong place would a admin kindly place it to the correct place, thank you.)

Sorry for the long post,
Thanks :pt1cable:  :pt1cable: 

More about : windows oem complications

a b V Motherboard
July 9, 2012 6:41:56 PM

Don't worry about any of that. I've done multiple re-installations on different hardware configurations and on multiple PCs at the same time for the past 2 years and the key still works. As long as you don't load it up on a bunch of machines it will keep working. I did have to call once (took 2-3 minutes) after a fresh install, but otherwise it was all authorized online.
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a c 265 $ Windows 7
a c 233 V Motherboard
July 9, 2012 6:43:10 PM

1. Maybe. Sometimes MS will allow for the exact model of mobo (and sometimes even a different model) to be re-activated. Not somethingyou can definitely count on.

2. Yes

3. Yes

4. Not an issue

5. Yes, you can do that as long as you only use the OEM license on the same system.

6. No, this sounds like trying to use a single license on more than one system.

Try these answers on for size.
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a c 426 $ Windows 7
a c 1530 V Motherboard
July 9, 2012 6:54:41 PM

Windows 7 OEM versions


According to Microsoft, roughly 90% of all copies of Windows are purchased with new PCs, preinstalled by Original Equipment Manufacturers that build the PC and sell Windows as part of the package. That will certainly be true with Windows 7.

OEM (major PC manufacturer) This is, by far, the cheapest way to purchase Windows 7. The top 20 or so PC makers (sometimes called “royalty OEMs”) collectively sell millions of PCs per month with Windows already installed on them. When you start up that PC for the first time, you accept two license agreements, one with the manufacturer and one with Microsoft. Here’s what you need to know about this type of license agreement:

Your Windows license agreement is between you and the PC maker, not between you and Microsoft.
The OEM uses special imaging tools to install Windows on PCs they manufacture. When you first turn on the PC, you accept a license agreement with the OEM and with Microsoft.
The PC maker is required to provide support for Windows. Except for security issues, Microsoft will not provide free support for any issues you have with Windows purchased from an OEM.
Your copy of Windows is locked to the PC on which you purchased it. You cannot transfer that license to another PC.
You can upgrade any components or peripherals on your PC and keep your license intact. You can replace the motherboard with an identical model or an equivalent model from the OEM if it fails. However, if you personally replace or upgrade the motherboard, your OEM Windows license is null and void.
Windows activation is typically not required when Windows is preinstalled by a royalty OEM. Instead, these copies are pre-activated at the factory. Your copy of Windows will be automatically reactivated if you reinstall it using the media or recovery partition from the PC maker, it will not require activation.
At the time you purchase an OEM copy of Windows 7 to be preinstalled on a new PC, you must choose either 32-bit or 64-bit Windows. Your agreement with the OEM determines whether you can switch to a different version; some PC makers support only a single version with specific PC models and will not allow you to switch from 32-bit to 64-bit (or vice versa) after purchase.

OEM (System Builder) If you buy a new computer from a local PC builder (sometimes called a “white box” PC), you can get an OEM edition of Windows preinstalled. This type of OEM license differs in a few crucial details from the version the big PC makers sell:

As with the royalty OEM versions, your copy of Windows is locked to the PC on which it is installed and cannot be transferred to a PC, nor can the motherboard be upgraded.
Under the terms of its agreement with Microsoft, the OEM must use the Windows OEM Preinstallation Kit (OPK) to install Windows. When you first turn on the PC, you accept a license agreement with the OEM and with Microsoft. The OEM is required to provide support for your copy of Windows.
Activation of your new PC is required within 30 days. The product key should already have been entered as part of the OPK installation and activation should be automatic and transparent to you.
Although it is possible for an individual to buy a System Builder copy of Windows 7 and install it on a new PC, that scenario is specifically prohibited by the license agreement, which requires that the software be installed using the OPK and then resold to a non-related third party. (As I noted in a September 2008 post, Microsoft once allowed “hobbyists” to use OEM System Builder software to build their own PCs, but the company switched to a hard-line stance on this issue sometime after Vista shipped in early 2007.)
When you purchase a white-box PC from a system builder, the PC maker preinstalls the Windows version you purchased. The package you receive includes reinstallation media and a product key that is similar to a full packaged product but cannot be used for an in-place upgrade. You may or may not receive both 32-bit and 64-bit media. If you receive both types of media, you can switch from 32-bit to 64-bit Windows or vice versa by performing a custom reinstall using your product key.


http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/23305-63-windows-vers...

More info here ^
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July 9, 2012 7:06:56 PM

COLGeek said:
1. Maybe. Sometimes MS will allow for the exact model of mobo (and sometimes even a different model) to be re-activated. Not somethingyou can definitely count on.

6. No, this sounds like trying to use a single license on more than one system.

.


I'm not trying to use the license on more than one system, but like you said in your answer for #1, you cannot definentely count on the same outcome all the time, as one representitive may be more sympathetic towards you than the others. I was looking at #6 as a possible way to navigate around having to rely on charming people, and just cloning the hard drive so windows doesn't realise you upgraded your motherboard or changed your hard drive. Though having been reflecting on it for half an hour, I don't think that you can change your motherboard and just clone your hard drive. Thanks for the response, :lol: 
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July 9, 2012 7:09:39 PM

trapper said:
Don't worry about any of that. I've done multiple re-installations on different hardware configurations and on multiple PCs at the same time for the past 2 years and the key still works. As long as you don't load it up on a bunch of machines it will keep working. I did have to call once (took 2-3 minutes) after a fresh install, but otherwise it was all authorized online.


Are you sure you have the OEM version of Windows? If so can you please elaborate on your situation and how you achieved this?
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a b V Motherboard
July 9, 2012 7:56:33 PM

sbpenguin said:
Are you sure you have the OEM version of Windows? If so can you please elaborate on your situation and how you achieved this?


I can assure you it is the OEM version. I bought it from a local PC parts store and it even had OEM in the part# and came in a cheap clear/white DVD case.

As far as how I achieved this...I didn't do anything special. I bought parts for two computers at the same time and installed the OEM on both and had them running for about a year before my friend's mobo fried. He got a new mobo (from Asus to Intel I think) and we did a clean install on it and it worked. At about the same time I bought a SSD and re-installed it on my PC as well. When I installed it to my SSD I was told to call Microsoft. I followed the machine's instructions and was given a new authorization key to plug in to authorize the install and was done.
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a c 426 $ Windows 7
a c 1530 V Motherboard
July 9, 2012 8:16:41 PM

No, this sounds like trying to use a single license on more than one system.

I agree with COLGeek ^
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