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100V appliance on 110v power supply

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Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 6:21:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says "100v AC" on the
back. I live in the UK, where the power supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can I
use a 110V transformer, or does it need to be strictly 100V?

Thanks,

--
tj hertz
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 6:21:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

"TJ Hertz" <tjhertz@gmail-HOLDTHESPAM.com> wrote in message
news:D SPme.18321$Li.17487@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says "100v AC" on the
> back. I live in the UK, where the power supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can
I
> use a 110V transformer, or does it need to be strictly 100V?
>
> Thanks,
>
> --
> tj hertz
>
>

It probably needs to be 100V. assuming it uses +/- 15Vdc internally the
10% or so may make the regulators run hot and therefore have shortened
life.

You can find the manual here http://www.vintagesynth.com/index2.html

Its possible that the internal transformer can be required for your voltage.
If not a buck/boost transformer in addition to the 240 to 120 step down
transformer will be needed.

An autotransformer would also work but i would not recomend it for the
average user as it would be too easy for it to get misadjusted and
consiquently blow up your vintage gear.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 6:21:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

"TJ Hertz" wrote ...
> I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says
> "100v AC" on the back. I live in the UK, where the power
> supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can I use a 110V transformer,
> or does it need to be strictly 100V?

I wouldn't risk 110V. So get a 10-12V transformer and hook it up
to "buck" part of the 110V to reduce it to ~100V.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 8:30:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

In rec.audio.pro, alt.electronics and alt.engineering.electrical, On
Tue, 31 May 2005 02:21:23 GMT, "TJ Hertz"
<tjhertz@gmail-HOLDTHESPAM.com> wrote:

>I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says "100v AC" on the
>back. I live in the UK, where the power supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can I
>use a 110V transformer, or does it need to be strictly 100V?

As others answered, as-is it's best to put a 'nominal' 100V into
it. But open it up (or look on the back panel, even), see if there are
any switches or plugs around the transformer. There might be two, one
to switch between 100V or 120V, the other for (100-120V) or
(200-240V). It could be as easy as moving a plug around to make it
work on a 'nominal' USA 120V line voltage.

I looked at the manual, found here:
http://www.akaipro.com/archives.html
direct link if you're really lazy:
http://www.akaipro.com/archive_doc/S1000Manual.zip
and didn't see anything about a 100V option. It says:
120VAC, 60Hz (USA, Canada)
220VAC, 50Hz (Europe, except UK)
240VAC, 50OHz (UK, Australia)
but never says how to switch between them, or if it's possible or
neccesary.
I also have no clue whether this is a switching or a linear supply,
though a knowledgable person could tell which it is with about three
seconds of looking at the innards. This can make a difference in how
and whether it can be (or even needs to be) switched.

>Thanks,

-----
http://mindspring.com/~benbradley
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 8:34:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

TJ Hertz wrote:

> I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says "100v AC" on the
> back. I live in the UK, where the power supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can I
> use a 110V transformer, or does it need to be strictly 100V?

Chances are that the '110V' transformer is actually 120V - the 'proper' US
voltage - unless you have proof to the contrary.

Japan does indeed have a true 100V supply.

You might be lucky enough to get a multi-tap autotransformer with 100V though.

Graham
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 12:57:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

Richard Crowley wrote:
> "TJ Hertz" wrote ...
>> I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says
>> "100v AC" on the back. I live in the UK, where the power
>> supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can I use a 110V transformer,
>> or does it need to be strictly 100V?
>
> I wouldn't risk 110V. So get a 10-12V transformer and hook it up
> to "buck" part of the 110V to reduce it to ~100V.

Can you explain this in more detail? Thanks.

--
tj hertz
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 3:49:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

TJ Hertz wrote:

> Richard Crowley wrote:
>
>>"TJ Hertz" wrote ...
>>
>>>I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says
>>>"100v AC" on the back. I live in the UK, where the power
>>>supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can I use a 110V transformer,
>>>or does it need to be strictly 100V?
>>
>>I wouldn't risk 110V. So get a 10-12V transformer and hook it up
>>to "buck" part of the 110V to reduce it to ~100V.
>
>
> Can you explain this in more detail? Thanks.
>

Usual warnings about this is mains and can easily kill.
Usual warnings about getting it wrong can cause a fire and
burn the house down. Usual warnings about not doing it
unless you are a professional. Usual warnings about, at the
very least, getting this wrong could destroy the equipment
you are actually worrying about. Usual warnings about, if
you have to ask what a "buck" or "boost" circuit is, you
quite possibly don't have the knowledge and experience to be
attempting this for the first time - especially on anything
that you value.


In theory:

You get a mains to 10 or 12 volt transformer and connect its
primary across the mains - thus producing 10 or 12 volts ac
from the secondary. You get a mains to 110 volt transformer
and connect its primary across the mains - thus producing
110 volts ac on its secondary. So the primaries are in
parallel across the supply.

Then you connect the secondaries in series, thus:

You then take a wire from the 110 volts secondary terminal
and connect it to one terminal of the 10/12 volts secondary.
Measure the voltage between the remaining unused secondary
terminals (one unused on each transformer secondary). If the
voltage is 100 volts - then those are the terminals that you
take power off for the load. If the voltage is too high
(higher than either secondary on its own), move the link
wire to ther other terminal on the 10/12 volt secondary and
repeat. Bingo, it should have dropped and you should have
100 volts now.

Basically, one secondary winding is made to be out of phase
with the other and thus cancels out some of the voltage
produced by it.

One variant of the technique is to connect the secondary of
the second transformer in series with the primary of the
first. There are other variants.

However, it all gets a little more complicated than that in
practice. Picking the right transformers is the key -
particularly as small transformers typically have terrible
regulation and their output voltages can vary widely with
load. Thus, while the output voltage may look fine off load
- it can change substantially when load is applied.

For many bits of equipment, too low a supply voltage can be
as bad as too high.

Personally, if I was concerned that the voltage was out of
specification for the equipment, I would use a variac and
set the voltage precisely, whilst on load. You can get
little variacs cheaply enough - try ebay, for example, that
is where I have got several of mine. Once set, fix the
adjusting knob in place - if it gets accidently moved you
would be in the doo doo. You can buy them bare or in an
enclosure with fitted mains lead and output socket - the
latter may be what you are looking for..

--
HTH

Sue
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 4:48:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

"TJ Hertz"
>
> I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says "100v AC" on the
> back. I live in the UK, where the power supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can
> I
> use a 110V transformer, or does it need to be strictly 100V?
>


** Only by taking the item to an audio service shop and having them run
tests ( using a " variac" and AC current meter) will you find out your
answer.

I often do this for customers so they know the right size and type of
step-down to use.


.......... Phil
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 5:52:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 31 May 2005 02:21:23 GMT, TJ Hertz
<tjhertz@gmail-HOLDTHESPAM.com> wrote:
> I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says "100v AC" on the
> back. I live in the UK, where the power supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can I
> use a 110V transformer, or does it need to be strictly 100V?
>

I'm not sure what the Japanese regulations are, but in the US, the
nameplate must reflect "the truth" for UL listing.

Regulations vary, so your best bet is to find a copy of the manual. If
there's a sane specifications page, that might tell you.

Fortunately, graymarketing electronics is fairly common, so tracking
down the right transformer shouldn't be too difficult.

The Best Possible Thing would be for the power supply to be jumpered and
have a large enough transformer to run on 50Hz.

Probably your safest course of action is to take it to a good
electronics tech and see. It may be as simple as moving a couple of
jumpers, or as complicated as replacing the transformer.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 6:14:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

On Tue, 31 May 2005 02:21:23 GMT, "TJ Hertz"
<tjhertz@gmail-HOLDTHESPAM.com> wrote:

>I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says "100v AC" on the
>back. I live in the UK, where the power supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can I
>use a 110V transformer, or does it need to be strictly 100V?
>
>Thanks,
You may have 2 problems:

1) Japan is 60Hz, UK is 50 Hz. Mains transformers and motors need
more iron for 50Hz and may overheat without it.

2) 240 to 100V Voltage, It may be simpler to go the 240V @ 50Hz to
12VDC and run a 60Hz inverter designed for Japans 100V.
, _
, | \ MKA: Steve Urbach
, | )erek No JUNK in my email please
, ____|_/ragonsclaw dragonsclawJUNK@JUNKmindspring.com
, / / / Running United Devices "Cure For Cancer" Project 24/7 Have you helped? http://www.grid.org
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 8:22:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

The extension for japanese websites is .co.jp , and most products made for
japanese market aren't probably even listed in international sites.Even if
TJ does it with the voltage, there's still the problem with the different
mains frequency.Evenmore, I never liked the transformer solution, they are
bulky, poorly constructed and add another ring in the chain so it's
difficult to troubleshoot the appliance.IMHO TJ should buy something from
the UK, that best fits his needs.

--
Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
major in electrical engineering, freelance electrician
FH von Iraklion-Kreta, freiberuflicher Elektriker
dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr
? "Ben Bradley" <ben_nospam_bradley@frontiernet.net> ?????? ??? ??????
news:jpon915i8jdim2snmdce3sdh8o0ib4hvv8@4ax.com...
> In rec.audio.pro, alt.electronics and alt.engineering.electrical, On
> Tue, 31 May 2005 02:21:23 GMT, "TJ Hertz"
> <tjhertz@gmail-HOLDTHESPAM.com> wrote:
>
> >I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says "100v AC" on the
> >back. I live in the UK, where the power supply is 240V or thereabouts.
Can I
> >use a 110V transformer, or does it need to be strictly 100V?
>
> As others answered, as-is it's best to put a 'nominal' 100V into
> it. But open it up (or look on the back panel, even), see if there are
> any switches or plugs around the transformer. There might be two, one
> to switch between 100V or 120V, the other for (100-120V) or
> (200-240V). It could be as easy as moving a plug around to make it
> work on a 'nominal' USA 120V line voltage.
>
> I looked at the manual, found here:
> http://www.akaipro.com/archives.html
> direct link if you're really lazy:
> http://www.akaipro.com/archive_doc/S1000Manual.zip
> and didn't see anything about a 100V option. It says:
> 120VAC, 60Hz (USA, Canada)
> 220VAC, 50Hz (Europe, except UK)
> 240VAC, 50OHz (UK, Australia)
> but never says how to switch between them, or if it's possible or
> neccesary.
> I also have no clue whether this is a switching or a linear supply,
> though a knowledgable person could tell which it is with about three
> seconds of looking at the innards. This can make a difference in how
> and whether it can be (or even needs to be) switched.
>
> >Thanks,
>
> -----
> http://mindspring.com/~benbradley
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
May 31, 2005 8:22:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

"Dimitrios Tzortzakakis" wrote...
> The extension for japanese websites is .co.jp , and most
> products made for japanese market aren't probably even
> listed in international sites.Even if TJ does it with the
> voltage, there's still the problem with the different mains
> frequency.

Usually only high-power equipment, or older equipment that
uses synchronous motors is mains-frequency sensitive. This
classic synth seems like it would not fit into either category.

> Evenmore, I never liked the transformer solution, they are
> bulky, poorly constructed and add another ring in the chain
> so it's difficult to troubleshoot the appliance.

No question that transformers are all that.

> IMHO TJ should buy something from the UK, that best fits
> his needs.

Seems unlikely that anyone could find a classic (which I took
to mean long out of production) Japanese synth wired for UK
power.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2005 12:23:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

In alt.engineering.electrical Dimitrios Tzortzakakis <use@address.below> wrote:

| The extension for japanese websites is .co.jp , and most products made for
| japanese market aren't probably even listed in international sites.Even if
| TJ does it with the voltage, there's still the problem with the different
| mains frequency.Evenmore, I never liked the transformer solution, they are
| bulky, poorly constructed and add another ring in the chain so it's
| difficult to troubleshoot the appliance.IMHO TJ should buy something from
| the UK, that best fits his needs.

While Japan does have an unusual voltage, the mains frequency tends to
not be a problem with equipment manufactured for the Japanese market,
or generally by Japanese manufacturers (some excepts will exist). This
is due to the fact that Japan is split in half with respect to frequency.
The eastern part is 60 Hz while the western part is 50 Hz. It makes for
some complications in sharing power across a national electric grid.
But it also means they have very good experience making things that work
fine on both 50 Hz and 60 Hz, which can be applied to exported products
even though other voltages (110-127 and 208-240) would be involved.

I periodically do see 120 to 100 volt transformers for sale on EBay.
These are usually in the business sections, but can be found also in
the electronics sections.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Phil Howard KA9WGN | http://linuxhomepage.com/ http://ham.org/ |
| (first name) at ipal.net | http://phil.ipal.org/ http://ka9wgn.ham.org/ |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2005 3:41:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

"Dimitrios Tzortzakakis"
>
> The extension for japanese websites is .co.jp , and most products made for
> japanese market aren't probably even listed in international sites.Even if
> TJ does it with the voltage, there's still the problem with the different
> mains frequency.



** Japan has both 50Hz and 60 Hz AC power, see:

http://kropla.com/electric2.htm

As a result, appliances made for their local market normally have
transformers made to cope with 50 Hz.

As a rule, even Japanese gear sold into the USA is OK on 50 Hz power, it is
only US and Canadian made gear sold for local use where the transformers are
sized purely for 60 Hz.





............. Phil
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2005 3:52:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

"Richard Crowley"

> Usually only high-power equipment, or older equipment that
> uses synchronous motors is mains-frequency sensitive. This
> classic synth seems like it would not fit into either category.


** Err - what is your idea of "high-power" ??

I regularly see AC transformers that run at an unsafe high temp because of
being used on 50 Hz power - when they were originally engineered for 60
Hz. The VA ratings involved are anywhere from 5 VA upwards.

Where low temp grades of enamel wire ( ie 90C) have been used - burn out
failures are a common event too.


> Seems unlikely that anyone could find a classic (which I took
> to mean long out of production) Japanese synth wired for UK power.


** Huh ????

So you think that Akai never sold export models of a "classic" synth into
the UK, Europe and Aussie ??



............. Phil
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2005 4:20:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

"Steve Urbach"
"TJ Hertz"
>
>>I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says "100v AC" on the
>>back. I live in the UK, where the power supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can
>>I
>>use a 110V transformer, or does it need to be strictly 100V?
>>
> You may have 2 problems:
>
> 1) Japan is 60Hz, UK is 50 Hz. Mains transformers and motors need
> more iron for 50Hz and may overheat without it.


** Japan has both 50Hz and 60 Hz AC power, see:

http://kropla.com/electric2.htm

As a result, appliances made for their local market normally have
transformers made to cope with 50 Hz.



2) 240 to 100V Voltage, It may be simpler to go the 240V @ 50Hz to
12VDC and run a 60Hz inverter designed for Japans 100V.


** Insane.




............... Phil
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2005 6:02:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

In alt.engineering.electrical phil-news-nospam@ipal.net wrote:
| In alt.engineering.electrical Dimitrios Tzortzakakis <use@address.below> wrote:
|
| | The extension for japanese websites is .co.jp , and most products made for
| | japanese market aren't probably even listed in international sites.Even if
| | TJ does it with the voltage, there's still the problem with the different
| | mains frequency.Evenmore, I never liked the transformer solution, they are
| | bulky, poorly constructed and add another ring in the chain so it's
| | difficult to troubleshoot the appliance.IMHO TJ should buy something from
| | the UK, that best fits his needs.
|
| While Japan does have an unusual voltage, the mains frequency tends to
| not be a problem with equipment manufactured for the Japanese market,
| or generally by Japanese manufacturers (some excepts will exist). This
| is due to the fact that Japan is split in half with respect to frequency.
| The eastern part is 60 Hz while the western part is 50 Hz. It makes for
| some complications in sharing power across a national electric grid.
| But it also means they have very good experience making things that work
| fine on both 50 Hz and 60 Hz, which can be applied to exported products
| even though other voltages (110-127 and 208-240) would be involved.

Actually, I got that reversed. The east is 50 Hz while the west is 60 Hz.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Phil Howard KA9WGN | http://linuxhomepage.com/ http://ham.org/ |
| (first name) at ipal.net | http://phil.ipal.org/ http://ka9wgn.ham.org/ |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2005 10:15:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<phil-news-nospam@ipal.net> wrote in message
news:D 7ih4g4t1e@news1.newsguy.com...

> While Japan does have an unusual voltage, the mains frequency tends to
> not be a problem with equipment manufactured for the Japanese market,
> or generally by Japanese manufacturers (some excepts will exist). This
> is due to the fact that Japan is split in half with respect to frequency.
> The eastern part is 60 Hz while the western part is 50 Hz. It makes for
> some complications in sharing power across a national electric grid.
> But it also means they have very good experience making things that work
> fine on both 50 Hz and 60 Hz, which can be applied to exported products
> even though other voltages (110-127 and 208-240) would be involved.

Might explain why there are so few Japanese turntables with synchronous
motors, and so many with direct-drive.

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2005 7:43:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

So, that's a synth?I thought that TJ with "sampler"meant some new japanese,
super high-tech device yet unknown to me.Then definitely, find maybe some
electrician or some kind of expert, that will take the responsibility (very
important point) to make your vintage gear working in UK.

--
Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
major in electrical engineering, freelance electrician
FH von Iraklion-Kreta, freiberuflicher Elektriker
dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr
? "Richard Crowley" <rcrowley7@xprt.net> ?????? ??? ??????
news:119oq6vnirbscea@corp.supernews.com...
> "Dimitrios Tzortzakakis" wrote...
> > The extension for japanese websites is .co.jp , and most
> > products made for japanese market aren't probably even
> > listed in international sites.Even if TJ does it with the
> > voltage, there's still the problem with the different mains
> > frequency.
>
> Usually only high-power equipment, or older equipment that
> uses synchronous motors is mains-frequency sensitive. This
> classic synth seems like it would not fit into either category.
>
> > Evenmore, I never liked the transformer solution, they are
> > bulky, poorly constructed and add another ring in the chain
> > so it's difficult to troubleshoot the appliance.
>
> No question that transformers are all that.
>
> > IMHO TJ should buy something from the UK, that best fits
> > his needs.
>
> Seems unlikely that anyone could find a classic (which I took
> to mean long out of production) Japanese synth wired for UK
> power.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2005 7:50:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

I vnderstand that, bvt I think that probably japanese prodvcts will have
labels and instrvctions in japanese, and most companies have an entirely
different brand-name in japanese, than in export models.The problems with
different voltages and freqvencies appear in Evropean Union railways.In
Switzerland,Avstria and Germany, the catenary system is 15kV, 16 2/3 HZ, and
of covrse everything, from normal locomotives to the high speed ICE is
designed only for this.In France is 1.5 kV and 3 kV DC, and in Greece we
have now 25 kV 50 Hz, so a German series locomotive wovld be totally
vseless.

--
Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
major in electrical engineering, freelance electrician
FH von Iraklion-Kreta, freibervflicher Elektriker
dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr
Ï "Phil Allison" <philallison@tpg.com.av> Ýãñáøå óôï ìÞíõìá
news:3g37rtFa5ao2U1@individval.net...
>
> "Dimitrios Tzortzakakis"
> >
> > The extension for japanese websites is .co.jp , and most prodvcts made
for
> > japanese market aren't probably even listed in international sites.Even
if
> > TJ does it with the voltage, there's still the problem with the
different
> > mains freqvency.
>
>
>
> ** Japan has both 50Hz and 60 Hz AC power, see:
>
> http://kropla.com/electric2.htm
>
> As a resvlt, appliances made for their local market normally have
> transformers made to cope with 50 Hz.
>
> As a rvle, even Japanese gear sold into the USA is OK on 50 Hz power, it
is
> only US and Canadian made gear sold for local vse where the transformers
are
> sized pvrely for 60 Hz.
>
>
>
>
>
> ............ Phil
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2005 7:55:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

Anyway, I don't think that the 10 volt difference would be much of a
problem, in Europe we used to have a 220/380 V (0.38 kV) three-phase
distribution system, with grounded-star secondary in substation
transformers, but I received a letter from our utility claiming that nominal
voltages are to change to 230/400 V (0.4 kV).That means that a 30 year old
radio or amplifier will be kaputt?Of course not.Modern switchgear also has a
230/400 V label, and older had 220/380 V labels.

--
Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
major in electrical engineering, freelance electrician
FH von Iraklion-Kreta, freiberuflicher Elektriker
dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr
Ï <phil-news-nospam@ipal.net> Ýãñáøå óôï ìÞíõìá
news:D 7j4v62ij8@news3.newsguy.com...
> In alt.engineering.electrical phil-news-nospam@ipal.net wrote:
> | In alt.engineering.electrical Dimitrios Tzortzakakis <use@address.below>
wrote:
> |
> | | The extension for japanese websites is .co.jp , and most products made
for
> | | japanese market aren't probably even listed in international
sites.Even if
> | | TJ does it with the voltage, there's still the problem with the
different
> | | mains frequency.Evenmore, I never liked the transformer solution, they
are
> | | bulky, poorly constructed and add another ring in the chain so it's
> | | difficult to troubleshoot the appliance.IMHO TJ should buy something
from
> | | the UK, that best fits his needs.
> |
> | While Japan does have an unusual voltage, the mains frequency tends to
> | not be a problem with equipment manufactured for the Japanese market,
> | or generally by Japanese manufacturers (some excepts will exist). This
> | is due to the fact that Japan is split in half with respect to
frequency.
> | The eastern part is 60 Hz while the western part is 50 Hz. It makes for
> | some complications in sharing power across a national electric grid.
> | But it also means they have very good experience making things that work
> | fine on both 50 Hz and 60 Hz, which can be applied to exported products
> | even though other voltages (110-127 and 208-240) would be involved.
>
> Actually, I got that reversed. The east is 50 Hz while the west is 60 Hz.
>
> --
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
---
> | Phil Howard KA9WGN | http://linuxhomepage.com/
http://ham.org/ |
> | (first name) at ipal.net | http://phil.ipal.org/
http://ka9wgn.ham.org/ |
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
---
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2005 7:55:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

"Dimitrios Tzortzakakis" wrote ...
> Anyway, I don't think that the 10 volt difference would be much of a
> problem, in Europe we used to have a 220/380 V (0.38 kV) three-phase
> distribution system, with grounded-star secondary in substation
> transformers, but I received a letter from our utility claiming that
> nominal
> voltages are to change to 230/400 V (0.4 kV).That means that a 30 year
> old
> radio or amplifier will be kaputt?Of course not.Modern switchgear also
> has a
> 230/400 V label, and older had 220/380 V labels.

Big, heavy-duty industrial and switchgear equipment is designed
for these kinds of volage variations because it is not uncommon
to have to accomodate them. This is the case practically everywhere,
it is not limited even to the EU normalization across Europe.

OTOH, consumer equipment designers have a much narower
expectation for mains supply voltages. Furthermore, they are
under orders to make their designs as economical as possible
which may further limit its ability to gracefully accept a wider
supply voltagfe.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 2, 2005 3:00:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

"Dimitrios Tzortzakakis"
>
>I vnderstand that,


** Like fvcking hell yov do.


> bvt I think that probably japanese prodvcts will have
> labels and instrvctions in japanese, and most companies have an entirely
> different brand-name in japanese, than in export models.


** The vnit is a local Japanese model ( hence rated for 100 volts) - see
the original post.


> The problems with
> different voltages and freqvencies appear in Evropean Union railways.


** Tres fvcking irrelevant - mate.




............ Phil




In
> Switzerland,Avstria and Germany, the catenary system is 15kV, 16 2/3 HZ,
> and
> of covrse everything, from normal locomotives to the high speed ICE is
> designed only for this.In France is 1.5 kV and 3 kV DC, and in Greece we
> have now 25 kV 50 Hz, so a German series locomotive wovld be totally
> vseless.




>
> --
> Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
> major in electrical engineering, freelance electrician
> FH von Iraklion-Kreta, freibervflicher Elektriker
> dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr
> Ï "Phil Allison" <philallison@tpg.com.av> Ýãñáøå óôï ìÞíõìá
> news:3g37rtFa5ao2U1@individval.net...
>>
>> "Dimitrios Tzortzakakis"
>> >
>> > The extension for japanese websites is .co.jp , and most prodvcts made
> for
>> > japanese market aren't probably even listed in international sites.Even
> if
>> > TJ does it with the voltage, there's still the problem with the
> different
>> > mains freqvency.
>>
>>
>>
>> ** Japan has both 50Hz and 60 Hz AC power, see:
>>
>> http://kropla.com/electric2.htm
>>
>> As a resvlt, appliances made for their local market normally have
>> transformers made to cope with 50 Hz.
>>
>> As a rvle, even Japanese gear sold into the USA is OK on 50 Hz power, it
> is
>> only US and Canadian made gear sold for local vse where the transformers
> are
>> sized pvrely for 60 Hz.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ............ Phil
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
June 3, 2005 7:12:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,alt.electronics,alt.engineering.electrical (More info?)

On Tue, 31 May 2005 02:21:23 +0000, TJ Hertz wrote:

> I've got a Japanese-bought AKAI S1000 sampler that says "100v AC" on the
> back. I live in the UK, where the power supply is 240V or thereabouts. Can I
> use a 110V transformer, or does it need to be strictly 100V?

As you've probably noticed by now, there's lots of noise on USENET.

If you can get a UK/100V transformer, do that, unless the AKAI is switch-
or jumper-selectable for different mains - I noticed that the manual does
mention UK wiring, but it was about taking care that it's earthed properly
and that hot and neutral are wired properly - this suggests to me that
there is either a jumper plug, a switch, or a terminal board to select
mains voltage. If so, then clearly this is the way to go.

If there isn't a switch or jumper plug on the back panel, and you're
not afraid to open up the case, take a look. It might be glaringly
obvious what you need to do, but if you see no options whatever, then
use the transformer. If it looks like there are options for different
solder connections, you might be able to figure it out, if you're handy
with a soldering iron. If you aren't confident of your electronics
skills, the wisest course of action (unless you can get a proper 240/100V
transformer for less than, say, UKP35-50) your safest option is to take it
to a qualified service person - they could do the switchover in a matter
of minutes, if it can be switched over. Failing that, the transformer
is the only option.

I'm hesitant to recommend a buck arrangement, unless you're confident
that you know what you're doing, but if it isn't switchable, and you
already have the 110V transformer, then this would be the cheapest.

Good Luck!
Rich
!