How do I de-ess a recorded vocal track?

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I'm a beginner...

The track was recorded with a pop filter, but still I have a good amount of
essy-ness. Is there a particular frequency I should notch?


--

- Jonathan

FOUR BRAND SPANKIN NEW SONGS FOR YOU!
Added February 2005!
Go to http://www.guestroomproject.com/ to
hear some music from my upcoming solo album,
the Guestroom Project. I play all the instruments.
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More about recorded vocal track
  1. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    "£ Î Z @ R Ð" <jattea@adelphia.net> wrote in message
    news:jaednd1vLfav9QLfRVn-tg@adelphia.com...
    > I'm a beginner...
    >
    > The track was recorded with a pop filter, but still I have a good amount
    of
    > essy-ness. Is there a particular frequency I should notch?
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > - Jonathan
    >
    > FOUR BRAND SPANKIN NEW SONGS FOR YOU!
    > Added February 2005!
    > Go to http://www.guestroomproject.com/ to
    > hear some music from my upcoming solo album,
    > the Guestroom Project. I play all the instruments.
    >
    >
    >

    Hi Jonathan,

    A de-esser usually uses a high-ratio fast compressor (or limiter) with an EQ
    in the side-chain. The EQ can sometimes be set for either band-pass or
    high-pass and it's frequency can sometimes be set to somewhere between 4KHz
    and 8KHz (set dependant on the quality of the "ess" and the ability to
    detect it). Also the compression, when an "ess" is detected, may either
    affect (duck) the whole audio frequency spectrum or a select
    range...sometimes switchable.

    There are both hardware are software plug-in de-essers available. You can
    also make your own from a compressor with a side-chain and an EQ.

    A freeware de-esser plug-in can be obtained from here (see spitfish):
    http://www.digitalfishphones.com/main.php?item=2&subItem=5.

    Mike Putrino
    www.MichaelPutrino.com
    Austin, TX
  2. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    £ Î Z @ R Ð wrote:
    > I'm a beginner...
    >
    > The track was recorded with a pop filter, but still I have a good amount of
    > essy-ness. Is there a particular frequency I should notch?
    >

    The pop filter wouldn't have helped with that.
    Eq and notch filters don't help much either.

    Proper de-essing is a function of a compressor with a filter in the side
    chain. Look up [de-essing compressor] on Google for lots and lots of
    info explaining how to do it.

    --
    Anahata
    anahata@treewind.co.uk -+- http://www.treewind.co.uk
    Home: 01638 720444 Mob: 07976 263827
  3. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    £ Î Z @ R Ð <jattea@adelphia.net> wrote:
    >I'm a beginner...
    >
    >The track was recorded with a pop filter, but still I have a good amount of
    >essy-ness. Is there a particular frequency I should notch?

    Better to retrack with a different mike, position, or vocalist.

    Frequency-selective compression (de-essing) can help, but the real
    solution is just to do it right in the first place.

    Depending on the pop filter, it may be making the sibilance worse.
    --scott

    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  4. Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

    The most a pop filter can do for De-essing is keeping it from
    distorting, the big thing of a pop filter is for plosives and the
    likes. It can as well help train an inexperienced studio singer to keep
    his or her distance from a sensitive microphone thus helping them to
    sing in a more even form (loudness wise). Witch may help (or may not)
    make it less audible.
    There may be some creative situations where you'd like to have some
    S-ing in the mix but that's a whole different thing all together.
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