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Algorithmix decrackler & DC/ART

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Anonymous
June 3, 2005 11:46:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hello All:

I am a home archivist whose hobby is the restoration of 78 rpm
recordings. For several years now, I have been using versions of the
DC/ART tool in my projects. Overall I have been most pleased with the
results and find the DC/ART product a fine package at a very good
price.

I have found one area, however, where the product has some difficulty.
Decrackling some of the noisier 78's is a hit and miss operation.
Either I take too much out and degrade the signal, or go too light and
leave too much of the irritating noise in the file.

I have searched the internet and found that the Waves/Algorithmix
product is thought of highly. The new version of their 'consumer'
software, Sonic Laundry version 2.5, allows you to purchase separate
modules. I have downloaded the demo version and the DeScratcher app
(with a sensitive decrackler tool )is particularly promising.

Has anyone purchased just the DeScratcher application alone and tried
to work it with a product like DC/ART 6 via direct X? Are there any
'gotcha's' I should look out for?

Any insights or opinions would be most welcome.

- Bill A.
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 1:29:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 3 Jun 2005 19:46:45 -0700, william.anderson@sap.com wrote:

>Hello All:
>
>I am a home archivist whose hobby is the restoration of 78 rpm
>recordings. For several years now, I have been using versions of the
>DC/ART tool in my projects. Overall I have been most pleased with the
>results and find the DC/ART product a fine package at a very good
>price.
>
>I have found one area, however, where the product has some difficulty.
>Decrackling some of the noisier 78's is a hit and miss operation.
>Either I take too much out and degrade the signal, or go too light and
>leave too much of the irritating noise in the file.
>
>I have searched the internet and found that the Waves/Algorithmix
>product is thought of highly. The new version of their 'consumer'
>software, Sonic Laundry version 2.5, allows you to purchase separate
>modules. I have downloaded the demo version and the DeScratcher app
>(with a sensitive decrackler tool )is particularly promising.
>
>Has anyone purchased just the DeScratcher application alone and tried
>to work it with a product like DC/ART 6 via direct X? Are there any
>'gotcha's' I should look out for?
>
>Any insights or opinions would be most welcome.
>
>- Bill A.

Algorithmix/Waves Decrackler is fine. It seems that they have a quite
good interpolation. If overdone, it may attack the top end (at 78s,
you will notice worn sybillants and cymbals etc. if the record has a
really good surface and a clean sound).

If DC/ART 6 hosts DX plug-ins, you should be able to pick Waves or
other DX plug-ins.

There's a tool from Algorithmix, "Renovator"* which combines a
spectrum graph with interpolation and filtering tools so one can mark
a zone of interest and filter just that zone; the idea is great as you
can filter out, say a base tone and its significant harmonics, a
narrow band in 5 -- 7 kHz region etc. But the tool _is_ overpriced.

Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia

*--at the time being, it's a Magix Sequoia plug-in, but I think the
latest Wavelab 5.01b can also host it. There's no a DX version yet
AFAIK.
Anonymous
June 6, 2005 6:06:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Jun 3, 2005, william.anderson@sap.com <william.anderson@sap.com>
commented:

> Has anyone purchased just the DeScratcher application alone and tried
> to work it with a product like DC/ART 6 via direct X? Are there any
> 'gotcha's' I should look out for?
>--------------------------------snip----------------------------------<

DirectX I've only toyed with, but so far, I've been very impressed with some
aspects of Sony's Oxford Restoration tools. I just had to use the Oxford
DeBuzz tool yesterday, and it was *stellar*. Far better than the Algorithmix
stuff, which is what's used in Waves' Restoration package.

I think the reality is that none of these tools is a "Swiss Army Knife," when
it comes to de-crackling, de-clicking, and all that. Sometimes, you have to
try each of them and evaluate them one at a time. Note also that you can
sometimes get better results by doing multiple light passes, rather than just
a single heavy pass. You might get fewer artifacts that way.

I also think that, especially for heavy pops and 78's, sometimes you have to
go in and redraw the audio waveforms by hand for best results. And often, a
combination of de-clicking, de-crackling, de-popping, AND hand-drawing is
what's needed to really clean up a project.

--MFW
Anonymous
June 6, 2005 7:43:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I've used the Algorithmix tools and they are fantastic. Unless DC/ART has
come a long way, they aren't even close to being in the same league. The
Sound Laundry stuff is closer to the same level, but the pro restoration
tools are on a level with Cedar and similar tools...

--Ben

Benjamin Maas
Fifth Circle Audio
Los Angeles, CA
http://www.fifthcircle.com
Anonymous
June 9, 2005 12:00:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hello - thanks to Edi, Benjamin and, especially, Marc for their
insightful postings here and via private e-mails. Your comments were
most helpful.

- Bill
!