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any experience with emtec Per 528 on studer b67?

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Anonymous
June 15, 2005 1:01:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

hello,
I've just purchased an old studer b67. as there is no tape available at
the moment I got 2 unused reels of emtec per 528 on german ebay. I will
give the tape recorder to be alligned as soon as I have the tapes. but
I'm wondering if this is a good choice for this older tape-machine. if
yes, there are few opportunities to get some more. thanks for some
info. I allready read the thread concerning tape for the studer B67,
but the emtec per 528 broadcast tape was not mentioned. by the way, is
there a significant difference between broadcast tape and studio tape
like the emtec 911?
Anonymous
June 15, 2005 6:31:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1118847896.256508.88730@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
matiss <logiciel@web.de> wrote:
>hello,
>I've just purchased an old studer b67. as there is no tape available at
>the moment I got 2 unused reels of emtec per 528 on german ebay. I will
>give the tape recorder to be alligned as soon as I have the tapes. but
>I'm wondering if this is a good choice for this older tape-machine. if
>yes, there are few opportunities to get some more. thanks for some
>info. I allready read the thread concerning tape for the studer B67,
>but the emtec per 528 broadcast tape was not mentioned. by the way, is
>there a significant difference between broadcast tape and studio tape
>like the emtec 911?
>

I think the 528 is a red oxide tape. The B67 will bias it up properly
but you will have to bias for a peak at 1 KHz rather than using the modern
overbias method.

The B67 should have no problem with 468, which is a much higher output
tape from BASF. The guys in the Netherlands are currently making 911
and say they should be starting 468 in a month or so. I don't know how
close these are to the original BASF/Agfa products, though.

I do not think the bias oscillator on the B67 is strong enough to properly
set up 911.

The modern mastering tapes will have much higher output level than the
older broadcast formulations, so your available dynamic range is much
greater.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 7:30:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

thanks for your feedback. I've tried the b67 with basf lgr50 (without
alignment) and the result is already very pleasant to me. I can go with
very high level from the mixing desk (soundcraft 6000) without
distortion. some high end is missing, probably because it's not aligned
to that tape, but It's a pleasant effect to my ears, as it takes out
the harshness of my mixes (only synths and samples). the basf lgr 50 is
not available, but the per 528 seems to be its successor. I hope all
the tape will be available again, as I'm curious to try out the SM468
you've mentioned.


Scott Dorsey schrieb:
> In article <1118847896.256508.88730@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> matiss <logiciel@web.de> wrote:
> >hello,
> >I've just purchased an old studer b67. as there is no tape available at
> >the moment I got 2 unused reels of emtec per 528 on german ebay. I will
> >give the tape recorder to be alligned as soon as I have the tapes. but
> >I'm wondering if this is a good choice for this older tape-machine. if
> >yes, there are few opportunities to get some more. thanks for some
> >info. I allready read the thread concerning tape for the studer B67,
> >but the emtec per 528 broadcast tape was not mentioned. by the way, is
> >there a significant difference between broadcast tape and studio tape
> >like the emtec 911?
> >
>
> I think the 528 is a red oxide tape. The B67 will bias it up properly
> but you will have to bias for a peak at 1 KHz rather than using the modern
> overbias method.
>
> The B67 should have no problem with 468, which is a much higher output
> tape from BASF. The guys in the Netherlands are currently making 911
> and say they should be starting 468 in a month or so. I don't know how
> close these are to the original BASF/Agfa products, though.
>
> I do not think the bias oscillator on the B67 is strong enough to properly
> set up 911.
>
> The modern mastering tapes will have much higher output level than the
> older broadcast formulations, so your available dynamic range is much
> greater.
> --scott
> --
> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Related resources
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 11:05:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

thanks. one last question. what would be the quantegy counterpart to
the emtec 468 for the b67?





Scott Dorsey schrieb:
> matiss <logiciel@web.de> wrote:
> >thanks for your feedback. I've tried the b67 with basf lgr50 (without
> >alignment) and the result is already very pleasant to me. I can go with
> >very high level from the mixing desk (soundcraft 6000) without
> >distortion. some high end is missing, probably because it's not aligned
> >to that tape, but It's a pleasant effect to my ears, as it takes out
> >the harshness of my mixes (only synths and samples). the basf lgr 50 is
> >not available, but the per 528 seems to be its successor. I hope all
> >the tape will be available again, as I'm curious to try out the SM468
> >you've mentioned.
>
> Don't make any judgements without doing the alignment. Align the machine
> to the tape and you'll probably be very surprised at the difference in
> sound.
>
> 528 has been long discontinued and since BASF/EMTEC no longer exists,
> you won't be seeing any new tape of that type.
>
> LGR 50 is one of the tapes that the guys at RMGI are supposed to be making,
> but I think you'll find 468 is a big step up from it if the RMGI version
> is anything close to the BASF version. http://www.rmgi.nl.
> --scott
> --
> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 1:01:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

matiss <logiciel@web.de> wrote:
>thanks for your feedback. I've tried the b67 with basf lgr50 (without
>alignment) and the result is already very pleasant to me. I can go with
>very high level from the mixing desk (soundcraft 6000) without
>distortion. some high end is missing, probably because it's not aligned
>to that tape, but It's a pleasant effect to my ears, as it takes out
>the harshness of my mixes (only synths and samples). the basf lgr 50 is
>not available, but the per 528 seems to be its successor. I hope all
>the tape will be available again, as I'm curious to try out the SM468
>you've mentioned.

Don't make any judgements without doing the alignment. Align the machine
to the tape and you'll probably be very surprised at the difference in
sound.

528 has been long discontinued and since BASF/EMTEC no longer exists,
you won't be seeing any new tape of that type.

LGR 50 is one of the tapes that the guys at RMGI are supposed to be making,
but I think you'll find 468 is a big step up from it if the RMGI version
is anything close to the BASF version. http://www.rmgi.nl.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 2:10:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

matiss <logiciel@web.de> wrote:
>thanks. one last question. what would be the quantegy counterpart to
>the emtec 468 for the b67?

It _might_ be Quantegy 406. Don't even think of trying to run without
flanges, though. There are a lot of things that make 406 a poorer
quality tape, not just the slitting, but right now it's all we have.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 6:04:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I have both, a small amount of unused lgr50 and soon a lttle bigger
amount of unused basf per 528. I will have to decide to which tape the
machine should be aligned. I thought I should let alingne it to the per
528, because I have more tape of this. I was looking at tape recorders
here and there in the last year and bought by curiosity an old uher
4200 and some reel of basf lgr50 that I also needed to make some
tape-loops for my space-echo. I've sold the uher, and bought a few
weeks ago my first serious tape machine, the studer b67, not knowing
that the tape suppliers closed their doors just a few months before. I
was kind surprised why all of a sudden no tape was available while the
last time i checked prices there where plenty of tapes from emtec and
quantegy... so I got some Per 528. anyway this is very new to me and I
will have to make my exoerience. I realize that I get more and more
touched by analog recording technology as it seems to die out. I
recently got an old thorens td 160 although I already have a technics
1210... and it makes me wanna listen to all my records again although I
wouldn't say I hear a difference. I'm kind a fascinated by this kind of
engeneering. it gives a much bigger value to music than the fact that
you can put 3 weeks og music into your i-pod...

by the way, what is a bulk demagnetizer? I have a demagnetizer for
tape-machines, how to demagnetize a used tape? how often can you erase
and record on tape without a loss of quality? I'm curious to use tape
in my music production also as an obvious effect, trying out tape
colloration or saturation on few instruments...





Edi Zubovic schrieb:
> On 15 Jun 2005 09:01:22 -0700, "matiss" <logiciel@web.de> wrote:
>
> >hello,
> >I've just purchased an old studer b67. as there is no tape available at
> >the moment I got 2 unused reels of emtec per 528 on german ebay. I will
> >give the tape recorder to be alligned as soon as I have the tapes. but
> >I'm wondering if this is a good choice for this older tape-machine. if
> >yes, there are few opportunities to get some more. thanks for some
> >info. I allready read the thread concerning tape for the studer B67,
> >but the emtec per 528 broadcast tape was not mentioned. by the way, is
> >there a significant difference between broadcast tape and studio tape
> >like the emtec 911?
>
> -- Both (once AGFA then BASF then Emtec) PER 528 and (BASF) LGR 50 (Mk
> 1) are mechanically strong and thick standard broadcast tapes. The PER
> 528 has been introduced in the eighties as a successor of, in Europe
> much used, AGFA PER 525. The PER 525 has a pink back coating and the
> PER 528 has a white one. Both are made to meet German broadcast
> standards. The PER 528 is in fact an improved PER 525 and the 525 has
> been in use since forever.
> BUT, they are, compared to fine-grain oxide types, quite abrasive.
> This is because the heads were consumables and the broadcast folks
> couldn't take a risk of oxide build-up and clogging during on air.
> Being strong and thick, they were charm for editing work and a skilled
> technician needed a couple of seconds to lead in a tape on a Studer
> A80 and make it standby.
> These tapes like CCIR/IEC machines.
>
> The LGR 50 (Mk 1) is a BASF competitor to AGFA and i think it is
> somewhat gentler to the heads. Personally I favour these much more
> than PER 525/528. You can't overload this one easily and it does have
> a great sound. This is my personal opinion, though.
>
> -- If you've got unused and sealed bands, they are great for
> recordings with maximum signal-to-noise ratio. If you happen to obtain
> already recorded tapes, you ought to demagnetize them well in a bulk
> demagnetizer first to get the optimal S/N. A simple "erasing" by erase
> head is inferior to that.
>
> Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 7:40:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Scott Dorsey" <kludge@panix.com> wrote in message
news:D 8s180$osn$1@panix2.panix.com...
> matiss <logiciel@web.de> wrote:
> >thanks. one last question. what would be the quantegy counterpart to
> >the emtec 468 for the b67?
>
> It _might_ be Quantegy 406. Don't even think of trying to run without
> flanges, though. There are a lot of things that make 406 a poorer
> quality tape, not just the slitting, but right now it's all we have.

I don't think Quantegy ever made anything like 468. The latter's resistance
to print-through and high-end dulling was not matched by anything the
ex-Ampex boys ever coated, and the slitting, which you mention, was
unequalled. I was about to say "unparalleled" but thought better of it.

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 11:21:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 15 Jun 2005 09:01:22 -0700, "matiss" <logiciel@web.de> wrote:

>hello,
>I've just purchased an old studer b67. as there is no tape available at
>the moment I got 2 unused reels of emtec per 528 on german ebay. I will
>give the tape recorder to be alligned as soon as I have the tapes. but
>I'm wondering if this is a good choice for this older tape-machine. if
>yes, there are few opportunities to get some more. thanks for some
>info. I allready read the thread concerning tape for the studer B67,
>but the emtec per 528 broadcast tape was not mentioned. by the way, is
>there a significant difference between broadcast tape and studio tape
>like the emtec 911?

-- Both (once AGFA then BASF then Emtec) PER 528 and (BASF) LGR 50 (Mk
1) are mechanically strong and thick standard broadcast tapes. The PER
528 has been introduced in the eighties as a successor of, in Europe
much used, AGFA PER 525. The PER 525 has a pink back coating and the
PER 528 has a white one. Both are made to meet German broadcast
standards. The PER 528 is in fact an improved PER 525 and the 525 has
been in use since forever.
BUT, they are, compared to fine-grain oxide types, quite abrasive.
This is because the heads were consumables and the broadcast folks
couldn't take a risk of oxide build-up and clogging during on air.
Being strong and thick, they were charm for editing work and a skilled
technician needed a couple of seconds to lead in a tape on a Studer
A80 and make it standby.
These tapes like CCIR/IEC machines.

The LGR 50 (Mk 1) is a BASF competitor to AGFA and i think it is
somewhat gentler to the heads. Personally I favour these much more
than PER 525/528. You can't overload this one easily and it does have
a great sound. This is my personal opinion, though.

-- If you've got unused and sealed bands, they are great for
recordings with maximum signal-to-noise ratio. If you happen to obtain
already recorded tapes, you ought to demagnetize them well in a bulk
demagnetizer first to get the optimal S/N. A simple "erasing" by erase
head is inferior to that.

Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 12:52:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1118955878.002885.316480@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> logiciel@web.de writes:

> I have both, a small amount of unused lgr50 and soon a lttle bigger
> amount of unused basf per 528. I will have to decide to which tape the
> machine should be aligned. I thought I should let alingne it to the per
> 528, because I have more tape of this.

That would be a good start, but why not learn to align the recorder
yourself, get the required test equipment, and then you can use
whatever you want. This is standard procedure, it's easy to do, and
probalby your greatest single expense is going to be a standard
alignment and calibration tape. If you want to go cheap, you can get
surplus lab test eqipment and spend under $100. If you have a little
more money and less space, you can buy the Neutrik Minilyzer and
Minirator and a cheap, small oscilloscope.

> by the way, what is a bulk demagnetizer? I have a demagnetizer for
> tape-machines, how to demagnetize a used tape? how often can you erase
> and record on tape without a loss of quality?

A bulk eraser is a large electromagnet that's used for erasing a whole
tape while it's on the reel. It's much bigger and more powerful than a
head demagnetizer. You don't lose recording quality by erasing a tape,
but physical wear will eventually degrade your recordings, new or old.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 7:47:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

concerning alignment, I already had a look at several instructions in
the net to get familiar with. but it seems to be a little complicated
for a beginner who is not very familiar with the measurement
units/reference levels and the required test equipment. a nakamichi
audio analyser (which seems very confotable) is very expensive and
rare, but an oszilloscope or millivoltmeter can be very cheap on ebay.
I would definitly want to do it by myself one day. it seems that in
germany you will have to buy at least two test tapes, there is not one
tape with all required test signals available. and last but not least I
don't have the service manual for my b67. I found one to download for
the revox a700, which seems to be similar to the b67 concerning the
mecanical part, but I guess the audio path is very different, and I
know where to get one for the b67 mkII. I'll have to find out the
differences to the b67.

Edi Zubovic schrieb:
> On 16 Jun 2005 14:04:38 -0700, in rec.audio.pro you wrote:
>
> >I have both, a small amount of unused lgr50 and soon a lttle bigger
> >amount of unused basf per 528. I will have to decide to which tape the
> >machine should be aligned. I thought I should let alingne it to the per
> >528, because I have more tape of this. I was looking at tape recorders
> >here and there in the last year and bought by curiosity an old uher
> >4200 and some reel of basf lgr50 that I also needed to make some
> >tape-loops for my space-echo. I've sold the uher, and bought a few
> >weeks ago my first serious tape machine, the studer b67, not knowing
> >that the tape suppliers closed their doors just a few months before. I
> >was kind surprised why all of a sudden no tape was available while the
> >last time i checked prices there where plenty of tapes from emtec and
> >quantegy... so I got some Per 528. anyway this is very new to me and I
> >will have to make my exoerience. I realize that I get more and more
> >touched by analog recording technology as it seems to die out. I
> >recently got an old thorens td 160 although I already have a technics
> >1210... and it makes me wanna listen to all my records again although I
> >wouldn't say I hear a difference. I'm kind a fascinated by this kind of
> >engeneering. it gives a much bigger value to music than the fact that
> >you can put 3 weeks og music into your i-pod...
>
> Both of the tapes should have similar electrical characteristics so
> they might match the Studer B 67 right off the start. But given the
> age of the machine, it is certainly advisable to check both electrical
> and mechanical parameters and readjust if and where necessarily.
>
> >by the way, what is a bulk demagnetizer? I have a demagnetizer for
> >tape-machines, how to demagnetize a used tape? how often can you erase
> >and record on tape without a loss of quality? I'm curious to use tape
> >in my music production also as an obvious effect, trying out tape
> >colloration or saturation on few instruments...
>
> -- As Mike pointed out, a bulk demagnetizer is an otherwise big and
> heavy piece of equipment. It served for erazing a whole tape pack at
> once. It's purpose was not as a kind of a document shredder, although
> it of course could be used just for zapping any recording, but
> its function has rather been to bring used tapes to their optimal S/N
> ratio, mechanical wear permitting. But this device is still too bulky
> and too costly to obtain it just for ocassional use and the advantages
> of a totally erased tape compared to that erased by erase head during
> normal recording process aren't that big at all to justify the need
> for it.
>
> A hand head demagnetizer is more required here and you have it.
>
>
> Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 7:51:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

and I will have a look at the mentioned neutrik test-equipment.
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 1:02:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

matiss <logiciel@web.de> wrote:
>I have both, a small amount of unused lgr50 and soon a lttle bigger
>amount of unused basf per 528. I will have to decide to which tape the
>machine should be aligned. I thought I should let alingne it to the per
>528, because I have more tape of this.

It only takes fifteen minutes to do the whole alignment once you have
things roughed in. It needs to be done on a weekly basis anyway. Just
set it up for one tape, record something, then set it up for another
tape, record the same thing, and decide which one you like the sound of.

Alignment is not a big deal. It's what interns are for.

I was looking at tape recorders
>here and there in the last year and bought by curiosity an old uher
>4200 and some reel of basf lgr50 that I also needed to make some
>tape-loops for my space-echo.

The Space-Echo requires tape with a lubricated backing, like cart
machine tape. You cannot use conventional recording machine tape on it.

>by the way, what is a bulk demagnetizer? I have a demagnetizer for
>tape-machines, how to demagnetize a used tape?

A head demagnetizer is much too small to erase a tape. The bulk eraser
will quickly wipe a tape and is a nice thing to have around, but not
something you absolutely need.

> how often can you erase
>and record on tape without a loss of quality?

This is a religious issue, and it depends also on the particular type
of tape. But for most tapes it's in the hundreds of passes, I think.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 1:15:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 16 Jun 2005 14:04:38 -0700, in rec.audio.pro you wrote:

>I have both, a small amount of unused lgr50 and soon a lttle bigger
>amount of unused basf per 528. I will have to decide to which tape the
>machine should be aligned. I thought I should let alingne it to the per
>528, because I have more tape of this. I was looking at tape recorders
>here and there in the last year and bought by curiosity an old uher
>4200 and some reel of basf lgr50 that I also needed to make some
>tape-loops for my space-echo. I've sold the uher, and bought a few
>weeks ago my first serious tape machine, the studer b67, not knowing
>that the tape suppliers closed their doors just a few months before. I
>was kind surprised why all of a sudden no tape was available while the
>last time i checked prices there where plenty of tapes from emtec and
>quantegy... so I got some Per 528. anyway this is very new to me and I
>will have to make my exoerience. I realize that I get more and more
>touched by analog recording technology as it seems to die out. I
>recently got an old thorens td 160 although I already have a technics
>1210... and it makes me wanna listen to all my records again although I
>wouldn't say I hear a difference. I'm kind a fascinated by this kind of
>engeneering. it gives a much bigger value to music than the fact that
>you can put 3 weeks og music into your i-pod...

Both of the tapes should have similar electrical characteristics so
they might match the Studer B 67 right off the start. But given the
age of the machine, it is certainly advisable to check both electrical
and mechanical parameters and readjust if and where necessarily.

>by the way, what is a bulk demagnetizer? I have a demagnetizer for
>tape-machines, how to demagnetize a used tape? how often can you erase
>and record on tape without a loss of quality? I'm curious to use tape
>in my music production also as an obvious effect, trying out tape
>colloration or saturation on few instruments...

-- As Mike pointed out, a bulk demagnetizer is an otherwise big and
heavy piece of equipment. It served for erazing a whole tape pack at
once. It's purpose was not as a kind of a document shredder, although
it of course could be used just for zapping any recording, but
its function has rather been to bring used tapes to their optimal S/N
ratio, mechanical wear permitting. But this device is still too bulky
and too costly to obtain it just for ocassional use and the advantages
of a totally erased tape compared to that erased by erase head during
normal recording process aren't that big at all to justify the need
for it.

A hand head demagnetizer is more required here and you have it.


Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 4:12:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1119005264.952440.62920@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> logiciel@web.de writes:

> concerning alignment, I already had a look at several instructions in
> the net to get familiar with. but it seems to be a little complicated
> for a beginner who is not very familiar with the measurement
> units/reference levels and the required test equipment.

Everything is complicated for a beginner, but it's easy to learn.
Setting microphones and mixing and playing the piano or guitar are far
more complicated (at least to me).

> a nakamichi
> audio analyser (which seems very confotable) is very expensive and
> rare, but an oszilloscope or millivoltmeter can be very cheap on ebay.

Take the cheap route. You'll learn more that way anyway.

> it seems that in
> germany you will have to buy at least two test tapes, there is not one
> tape with all required test signals available.

There are articles on the MRL web site http://www.mrltapes.com that
explain how to use any tape (assuming it's the correct width for your
machine) to set up levels and equalization for any machine. It's
simple arithmetic.

> and last but not least I
> don't have the service manual for my b67.

Open the case and see if you can find labels on the various adjustable
internal controls. I'm sure they're all identified. A manual is always
nice, but really all you need to know is where the adjustments are,
and on any professional recorder (and many consumer ones) there's
either a sticker with a layout diagram of what's where or the
functions of the various trimpots, variable inductors and variable
capacitors are labeled right on the chassis.

You just aren't trying hard enough to get enthusiastic about this.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 5:19:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

you have a talent to motivate, since your last but one reply I already
had a look to the rec. and repr. amps, checked again test-tapes seller
in germany, and millivolt- and stereometers on ebay, and having another
look into my alignment instructions... most of it is understandable,
the bias setting curves have still have some mysterious effect on me.
thanks for the link, they offer a lot of information!

Mike Rivers schrieb:
> In article <1119005264.952440.62920@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> logiciel@web.de writes:
>
> > concerning alignment, I already had a look at several instructions in
> > the net to get familiar with. but it seems to be a little complicated
> > for a beginner who is not very familiar with the measurement
> > units/reference levels and the required test equipment.
>
> Everything is complicated for a beginner, but it's easy to learn.
> Setting microphones and mixing and playing the piano or guitar are far
> more complicated (at least to me).
>
> > a nakamichi
> > audio analyser (which seems very confotable) is very expensive and
> > rare, but an oszilloscope or millivoltmeter can be very cheap on ebay.
>
> Take the cheap route. You'll learn more that way anyway.
>
> > it seems that in
> > germany you will have to buy at least two test tapes, there is not one
> > tape with all required test signals available.
>
> There are articles on the MRL web site http://www.mrltapes.com that
> explain how to use any tape (assuming it's the correct width for your
> machine) to set up levels and equalization for any machine. It's
> simple arithmetic.
>
> > and last but not least I
> > don't have the service manual for my b67.
>
> Open the case and see if you can find labels on the various adjustable
> internal controls. I'm sure they're all identified. A manual is always
> nice, but really all you need to know is where the adjustments are,
> and on any professional recorder (and many consumer ones) there's
> either a sticker with a layout diagram of what's where or the
> functions of the various trimpots, variable inductors and variable
> capacitors are labeled right on the chassis.
>
> You just aren't trying hard enough to get enthusiastic about this.
>
> --
> I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
> However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
> lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
> you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
> and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
!