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What would you charge to do the following?

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June 16, 2005 8:13:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

You may have seen my previous posts regarding doing a DVCam tape transfer to
a Digital8 camcorder, adding reverb on my computer then reversing the whole
process. While I'm at it I'm also taking out or reducing a few bumps in the
sound - fiddle player bumps the mic, thunks when the singer puts her mic in
the stand, etc.

What would you charge for something like this? The first project I'm doing
is for a friend and while I'm not doing it for charity, would want to cut
them a break. This particular project is a 30-minute show. Part of the
equation is about 2 hours on the road (30 mins each way, 2 trips) to
transfer from and then back to their gear.

Now, surprise, surprise, the station manager has e-mailed asking if I want
to give some other videos the same treatment. It's a relatively small local
cable station, which is no doubt why they're asking an outsider to do it.
Surely they know what local outfits who are "in the biz" charge, presumably
they'd look for me to do it for less. He hasn't specified how many they
need done other than "some".

A month ago I was transferring my theme park footage and family's old 8mm
movies to DVD, now I'm being asked to do video processing for money, this
has been an unexpected turn of events.

Thanks for all insight.

More about : charge

Anonymous
June 16, 2005 8:13:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Doc" <docsavage20@xhotmail.com> wrote in message
news:syhse.6250$pa3.4879@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> You may have seen my previous posts regarding doing a DVCam tape transfer
> to
> a Digital8 camcorder, adding reverb on my computer then reversing the
> whole
> process. While I'm at it I'm also taking out or reducing a few bumps in
> the
> sound - fiddle player bumps the mic, thunks when the singer puts her mic
> in
> the stand, etc.
>
> What would you charge for something like this? The first project I'm doing
> is for a friend and while I'm not doing it for charity, would want to cut
> them a break. This particular project is a 30-minute show. Part of the
> equation is about 2 hours on the road (30 mins each way, 2 trips) to
> transfer from and then back to their gear.
>
> Now, surprise, surprise, the station manager has e-mailed asking if I want
> to give some other videos the same treatment. It's a relatively small
> local
> cable station, which is no doubt why they're asking an outsider to do it.
> Surely they know what local outfits who are "in the biz" charge,
> presumably
> they'd look for me to do it for less. He hasn't specified how many they
> need done other than "some".
>
> A month ago I was transferring my theme park footage and family's old 8mm
> movies to DVD, now I'm being asked to do video processing for money, this
> has been an unexpected turn of events.
>
> Thanks for all insight.

Just to clarify... Do you mean that you are taking material recorded on
digital 8 into a computer, fiddling the audio, then transfering the result
back to digital 8? Or, transferring from their digital 8 to your DVCam,
loading the tape into the computer, fiddling the audio, transferring back to
DVCam, then transferring to their digital 8?

Whatever, figure your total time for transfers at both ends, digitizing into
computer, and audio sweetening. I'd guess it at 6 hours minimum. What are
your time and tools worth? What will the traffic bear? Maybe some cable
company production guys will chime in with what is reasonable from their
point of view.

Steve King
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 9:48:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The question is not what anyone else would charge. The question is, what
hourly wage do you want to get that will make you feel good about doing this
work? Now consider what overhead you must pay in order to perform this work.

When setting up a business of any nature one must consider several factors.
If you consider a work week to be 40 hours, you then calculate the number of
days available for performing work within a year's time. Take away all the
holiday's that pertain to you - considering any national and religious
holidays or any days when work is not done, including vacation time.
Subtract these from the total number of weeks in a year. That gives your
total working schedule.

Now, factor in any overhead you pay. This includes utilities, rent,
vehicles, insurances, etc. Calculate that for one total year and then divide
it by the number of hours available within the number of days available in
work schedule you figured out above.

This amount will be a total per hour you must make in order to cover your
expenses of being in business. Now, figure out the total you want to make
per hour and add that in. If you have employees then add in their hourly and
any insurance necessary for workman's comp. Whether or not you have
employees you should add about 10% for contingencies to your overall hourly,
i.e. overhead plus wage plus 10%.

Though this is not an exact manner in which all businesses figure their
charges per hour it is a good way to determine whether you will make money
in the long run or go bankrupt. There are a few books on setting up a
business published by McGraw-Hill that have a more concise list of how to
determine what you need to charge for the services you provide.

--
Larry Johnson
Digital Video Solutions
webmaster@digitalvideosolutions.com
http://www.digitalvideosolutions.com
877-227-6281 Toll Free Sales Assistance
386-672-1941 Customer Service
386-672-1907 Technical Support
386-676-1515 Fax

"Doc" <docsavage20@xhotmail.com> wrote in message
news:syhse.6250$pa3.4879@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> You may have seen my previous posts regarding doing a DVCam tape transfer
> to
> a Digital8 camcorder, adding reverb on my computer then reversing the
> whole
> process. While I'm at it I'm also taking out or reducing a few bumps in
> the
> sound - fiddle player bumps the mic, thunks when the singer puts her mic
> in
> the stand, etc.
>
> What would you charge for something like this? The first project I'm doing
> is for a friend and while I'm not doing it for charity, would want to cut
> them a break. This particular project is a 30-minute show. Part of the
> equation is about 2 hours on the road (30 mins each way, 2 trips) to
> transfer from and then back to their gear.
>
> Now, surprise, surprise, the station manager has e-mailed asking if I want
> to give some other videos the same treatment. It's a relatively small
> local
> cable station, which is no doubt why they're asking an outsider to do it.
> Surely they know what local outfits who are "in the biz" charge,
> presumably
> they'd look for me to do it for less. He hasn't specified how many they
> need done other than "some".
>
> A month ago I was transferring my theme park footage and family's old 8mm
> movies to DVD, now I'm being asked to do video processing for money, this
> has been an unexpected turn of events.
>
> Thanks for all insight.
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 10:15:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <XXise.89482$VH2.20201@tornado.tampabay.rr.com> video@digitalvideosolutions.com writes:

> The question is not what anyone else would charge. The question is, what
> hourly wage do you want to get that will make you feel good about doing this
> work? Now consider what overhead you must pay in order to perform this work.
>
> When setting up a business of any nature one must consider several factors.
> If you consider a work week to be 40 hours, you then calculate the number of
> days available for performing work within a year's time. Take away all the
> holiday's that pertain to you - considering any national and religious
> holidays or any days when work is not done, including vacation time.
> Subtract these from the total number of weeks in a year. That gives your
> total working schedule.

I think Doc's looking for a ballpark price for a few spare time jobs,
not a career as an audio editor.

I'd float $100 per program to the station and see if they kick him out
or hand him 100 tapes and say "can you have these by next week?" He
has the equipment and would have it whether he did this job or not.
Other than the electricity to keep his computer on for a few more
hours there's no overhead that he wouldn't otherwise have to support
his hobby.

So at this point it's a hobby that brings in some cash, not a
business. If it grows to the point where he has to quit his day job or
hire an assistant to keep up with the workflow, then he can start
thinking about how much work he can do in a day, how many days' work
he can count on in a month, and how much per month he needs in order
to pay the mortage, feed the kids, and make the payments on the Lexus.




--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
June 16, 2005 11:23:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Steve King" <steve@TakeThisOutToReplysteveking.net> wrote in message
news:6oidnfeGGPa1LizfRVn-sw@comcast.com...

> Just to clarify... Do you mean that you are taking material recorded on
> digital 8 into a computer, fiddling the audio, then transfering the result
> back to digital 8? Or, transferring from their digital 8 to your DVCam,
> loading the tape into the computer, fiddling the audio, transferring back
to
> DVCam, then transferring to their digital 8?

Their DVCam to my Digital8 then to my Computer. After fixing the video with
Soundforge, reverse the process. All via Firewire of course.
Anonymous
June 16, 2005 11:30:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bill hourly.
Estimate your time-per-job as 5 to 10 times the length of the piece AFTER
transfer is done (which also goes hourly). If you can get the work done
faster, you get to charge somewhat less than the estimate (if you;re so
inclined) and look golden.

Your hourly rate can be anything from $1/hr to $150/hr or more...
But you're a fool to do it for dirt in the lowest 1/5 of that range....


On 6/16/05 12:13 PM, in article
syhse.6250$pa3.4879@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net, "Doc"
<docsavage20@xhotmail.com> wrote:

> You may have seen my previous posts regarding doing a DVCam tape transfer to
> a Digital8 camcorder, adding reverb on my computer then reversing the whole
> process. While I'm at it I'm also taking out or reducing a few bumps in the
> sound - fiddle player bumps the mic, thunks when the singer puts her mic in
> the stand, etc.
>
> What would you charge for something like this? The first project I'm doing
> is for a friend and while I'm not doing it for charity, would want to cut
> them a break. This particular project is a 30-minute show. Part of the
> equation is about 2 hours on the road (30 mins each way, 2 trips) to
> transfer from and then back to their gear.
>
> Now, surprise, surprise, the station manager has e-mailed asking if I want
> to give some other videos the same treatment. It's a relatively small local
> cable station, which is no doubt why they're asking an outsider to do it.
> Surely they know what local outfits who are "in the biz" charge, presumably
> they'd look for me to do it for less. He hasn't specified how many they
> need done other than "some".
>
> A month ago I was transferring my theme park footage and family's old 8mm
> movies to DVD, now I'm being asked to do video processing for money, this
> has been an unexpected turn of events.
>
> Thanks for all insight.
>
>
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 12:31:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 6/16/05 3:23 PM, in article
rkkse.5668$VK4.103@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net, "Doc"
<docsavage20@xhotmail.com> wrote:

>
> "Steve King" <steve@TakeThisOutToReplysteveking.net> wrote in message
> news:6oidnfeGGPa1LizfRVn-sw@comcast.com...
>
>> Just to clarify... Do you mean that you are taking material recorded on
>> digital 8 into a computer, fiddling the audio, then transfering the result
>> back to digital 8? Or, transferring from their digital 8 to your DVCam,
>> loading the tape into the computer, fiddling the audio, transferring back
> to
>> DVCam, then transferring to their digital 8?
>
> Their DVCam to my Digital8 then to my Computer.

Why is the dig8 in the chain?
Doesn;t this involve multiple conversions?
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 12:31:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"SSJVCmag" <ten@nozirev.gamnocssj.com> wrote in message
news:BED759D2.A5A0%ten@nozirev.gamnocssj.com...
> On 6/16/05 3:23 PM, in article
> rkkse.5668$VK4.103@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net, "Doc"
> <docsavage20@xhotmail.com> wrote:
>
>>
>> "Steve King" <steve@TakeThisOutToReplysteveking.net> wrote in message
>> news:6oidnfeGGPa1LizfRVn-sw@comcast.com...
>>
>>> Just to clarify... Do you mean that you are taking material recorded on
>>> digital 8 into a computer, fiddling the audio, then transfering the
>>> result
>>> back to digital 8? Or, transferring from their digital 8 to your DVCam,
>>> loading the tape into the computer, fiddling the audio, transferring
>>> back
>> to
>>> DVCam, then transferring to their digital 8?
>>
>> Their DVCam to my Digital8 then to my Computer.
>
> Why is the dig8 in the chain?
> Doesn;t this involve multiple conversions?

The OP is copying from client's DVCam to his dig8, which is what he has, via
firewire.

Steve King
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 12:31:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"SSJVCmag" wrote ...
> "Doc" wrote:
>> "Steve King" wrote ...
>>
>>> Just to clarify... Do you mean that you are taking material recorded
>>> on
>>> digital 8 into a computer, fiddling the audio, then transfering the
>>> result
>>> back to digital 8? Or, transferring from their digital 8 to your
>>> DVCam,
>>> loading the tape into the computer, fiddling the audio, transferring
>>> back
>> to
>>> DVCam, then transferring to their digital 8?
>>
>> Their DVCam to my Digital8 then to my Computer.
>
> Why is the dig8 in the chain?

Because "Doc" doesn't have a DVcam machine.

> Doesn;t this involve multiple conversions?

No. Not if he is using digital (i.e. Firewire) at every step.
D8 records exactly the same bitstream/codec as DV.
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 12:36:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Doc" <docsavage20@xhotmail.com> wrote in message...

> Now, surprise, surprise, the station manager has e-mailed asking if I want
> to give some other videos the same treatment. It's a relatively small local
> cable station, which is no doubt why they're asking an outsider to do it.
> Surely they know what local outfits who are "in the biz" charge, presumably
> they'd look for me to do it for less. He hasn't specified how many they
> need done other than "some".

Me?

At home, in my spare time, with no deadlines... $35 per hour plus supplies.

In the studio with no pressure or deadlines... $55 hr.

In the studio with someone looking over my shoulder... $70 hr.

You?

If you enjoy and have fun with the projects and they may lead to more
and various income streams... you might offer a flat rate per "show".
Just get what makes you feel comfortable, so that when it's all over,
you won't feel 'screwed'... and price according to your abilites and
their demands.


--
David Morgan (MAMS)
http://www.m-a-m-s DOT com
Morgan Audio Media Service
Dallas, Texas (214) 662-9901
_______________________________________
http://www.artisan-recordingstudio.com
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 1:51:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Whatever you do, DO NOT under any circumstances bid these jobs at a
flat rate. Give them an hourly rate with a maximum and minimum of
hours. have it understood that if a particular job exceeds a set
number of hours, it will stop and be re-bid based on the new situation.
If on occasion you speed thru one of these, feel free to rebate the
station any amount you feel is overpaid.

As an editor of long experience, I want to warn you that you are in
for WAY more time spent on these than you can now imagine, and at a
flat rate, you will be working at or probably below minimum wage before
it's all over. Worse, if you lowball up front, it will become very hard
to raise your rates with these clients later. Burnout or bankruptcy
will result.
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 5:25:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

nobody special wrote:
> Whatever you do, DO NOT under any circumstances bid these jobs at a
> flat rate. Give them an hourly rate with a maximum and minimum of
> hours. have it understood that if a particular job exceeds a set
> number of hours, it will stop and be re-bid based on the new situation.
> If on occasion you speed thru one of these, feel free to rebate the
> station any amount you feel is overpaid.
>
> As an editor of long experience, I want to warn you that you are in
> for WAY more time spent on these than you can now imagine, and at a
> flat rate, you will be working at or probably below minimum wage before
> it's all over. Worse, if you lowball up front, it will become very hard
> to raise your rates with these clients later. Burnout or bankruptcy
> will result.
>

This is very good advice....I would agree 100%. Also, putting a specific
charge on a deal like this, especially when friends are involved is very
tough. Only you know how much your work is worth, and how good your
friends are that they should deserve a large or small discount. Whatever
you decide on, I would take the above advice!

Jonny Durango
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 5:40:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

This is what I was thinking....this is spare time work. However, I can tell
you that you never really make any significant money doing this...it is
mostly 'going to the movies money. ' Soon people will want more services
and you can't give it to them because you don't have the resources (time
etc) relative to the real job.
June 17, 2005 6:41:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Richard Crowley" <rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote in message
news:11b4a5qpqrn2v14@corp.supernews.com...

> Because "Doc" doesn't have a DVcam machine.
>
> > Doesn;t this involve multiple conversions?
>
> No. Not if he is using digital (i.e. Firewire) at every step.
> D8 records exactly the same bitstream/codec as DV.

After having completed the project and re-transferring the file to the cam
and viewing the analog output to my TV, dang, if there's any degredation of
the image compared to the original, I sure can't see it. Looks identical to
me.
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 4:33:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks for a few people giving him a figure [ which was what he was
looking for ]
he can take an average . I know i'd be happy to make 25.00/hr min 8 hrs but
that
doesn't consider running a facility or business ]

One rule of thumb some people use is one hour of time for every minute of
" produced " material . Of course this can vary depending on function ,
transfer
or editing .

and you want to consider not loballing & pulling the whole rate down for
everyone
who have to pay for space & gear & insurance , it just won't last in the
long run .
[ i guess this is a mix of you & your gear at someones else's place ? ]

good luck , regards Greg



"SSJVCmag" <ten@nozirev.gamnocssj.com> wrote in message
news:BED74B7B.A574%ten@nozirev.gamnocssj.com...
> Bill hourly.
> Estimate your time-per-job as 5 to 10 times the length of the piece AFTER
> transfer is done (which also goes hourly). If you can get the work done
> faster, you get to charge somewhat less than the estimate (if you;re so
> inclined) and look golden.
>
> Your hourly rate can be anything from $1/hr to $150/hr or more...
> But you're a fool to do it for dirt in the lowest 1/5 of that range....
>
>
> On 6/16/05 12:13 PM, in article
> syhse.6250$pa3.4879@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net, "Doc"
> <docsavage20@xhotmail.com> wrote:
>
> > You may have seen my previous posts regarding doing a DVCam tape
transfer to
> > a Digital8 camcorder, adding reverb on my computer then reversing the
whole
> > process. While I'm at it I'm also taking out or reducing a few bumps in
the
> > sound - fiddle player bumps the mic, thunks when the singer puts her mic
in
> > the stand, etc.
> >
> > What would you charge for something like this? The first project I'm
doing
> > is for a friend and while I'm not doing it for charity, would want to
cut
> > them a break. This particular project is a 30-minute show. Part of the
> > equation is about 2 hours on the road (30 mins each way, 2 trips) to
> > transfer from and then back to their gear.
> >
> > Now, surprise, surprise, the station manager has e-mailed asking if I
want
> > to give some other videos the same treatment. It's a relatively small
local
> > cable station, which is no doubt why they're asking an outsider to do
it.
> > Surely they know what local outfits who are "in the biz" charge,
presumably
> > they'd look for me to do it for less. He hasn't specified how many they
> > need done other than "some".
> >
> > A month ago I was transferring my theme park footage and family's old
8mm
> > movies to DVD, now I'm being asked to do video processing for money,
this
> > has been an unexpected turn of events.
> >
> > Thanks for all insight.
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
June 17, 2005 10:16:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop,rec.video.production,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Ok, everything about setting up a business aside. The market you are in has
everything to do with it, and no matter what you charge there will always be
someone out there willing to charge less - for whatever reason. With that
said think back to my first statement/queston, "The question is not what
anyone else would charge. The question is, what hourly wage do you want to
get that will make you feel good about doing this work?" Then you have to
couple that with another structure of thinking - who is it you are doing
this work for?

We do editing for a wide variety of both businesses and individuals. When
doing business with businesses we charge a rate that is competitive to other
professional editing houses in our area. When doing business for individuals
there is a completely different pricing structure. We have found a
comfortable level of doing business with individuals by creating an
understanding of how their jobs are handled, and when they are handled. All
this type of business comes through word of mouth from other customers in
the past, and they all come knowing their work will be done when time
allows.

There are never any deadlines, and if there are they pay a higher price like
the businesses do. With this understanding and for their patience we always
give them the absolute best end product possible. We really make their
material look like a Hollywood production, which in turn bring in a steady
flow of this type of business. It also keeps our chops up for doing our
other higher priced work. By careful explanation of the time involved to
make these productions so nice we often garner an extra one to two thousand
a month through these customers.

What are you comfortable making? What are they comfortable giving? And, is
the quality of the product worth it to them? If they don't think so, then
you need to improve one of three things - either the quality of your work,
the quality of your sales approach or maybe even both. There's always room
for improvement. Get what you need so they feell like you are not taking
advantage of them, and enough so that you don't feel like your being taken
advantage of.

--
Larry Johnson
Digital Video Solutions
webmaster@digitalvideosolutions.com
http://www.digitalvideosolutions.com
877-227-6281 Toll Free Sales Assistance
386-672-1941 Customer Service
386-672-1907 Technical Support
386-676-1515 Fax



"Doc" <docsavage20@xhotmail.com> wrote in message
news:syhse.6250$pa3.4879@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> You may have seen my previous posts regarding doing a DVCam tape transfer
> to
> a Digital8 camcorder, adding reverb on my computer then reversing the
> whole
> process. While I'm at it I'm also taking out or reducing a few bumps in
> the
> sound - fiddle player bumps the mic, thunks when the singer puts her mic
> in
> the stand, etc.
>
> What would you charge for something like this? The first project I'm doing
> is for a friend and while I'm not doing it for charity, would want to cut
> them a break. This particular project is a 30-minute show. Part of the
> equation is about 2 hours on the road (30 mins each way, 2 trips) to
> transfer from and then back to their gear.
>
> Now, surprise, surprise, the station manager has e-mailed asking if I want
> to give some other videos the same treatment. It's a relatively small
> local
> cable station, which is no doubt why they're asking an outsider to do it.
> Surely they know what local outfits who are "in the biz" charge,
> presumably
> they'd look for me to do it for less. He hasn't specified how many they
> need done other than "some".
>
> A month ago I was transferring my theme park footage and family's old 8mm
> movies to DVD, now I'm being asked to do video processing for money, this
> has been an unexpected turn of events.
>
> Thanks for all insight.
>
>
!