Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Does Popper Stopper make a big difference?

Last response: in Home Audio
Share
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 12:11:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Just another newbie question. I see some using them and others not.



Brendan
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 12:11:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>yes and no. A good vocalist who doesn't get right up on the mic or hit
>it with plosives can get by without one. For someone with lesser
>technique, it will protect your capsule and reduce plosives.

Unless you're sure about their level of skill at the mic, I'd just use
it as a matter of course. Saves headaches.
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 12:11:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <Xns9679A4C08C744hortajanus6org@208.49.80.60> horta@janus6.org writes:

> Just another newbie question. I see some using them and others not.

If you have pops, use a pop-stopper. If you don't, then you don't need
one. Some vocalists know how to sing or speak without plosives, others
need a little help.

And yes, not all pop-stoppers are alike. Some work a lot better than
others. With some singers, just a little is all you need so "a piece
of panty hose over a coat hanger worked fine for me" might well be
true. You can make one for next to nothing, buy commercially made
onees for $20 - $60, and here's one for $130 that's really, really
impressive in its ability to block a puff of air:

http://www.lasvegasproaudio.com/pasu.html



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Related resources
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 12:11:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The Horta <horta@janus6.org> wrote:
>Just another newbie question. I see some using them and others not.

It's a tool that fixes a problem. Some vocalists pop their Ps. Some
do not. Everybody should have one in the kit because sooner or later
you'll be dealing with someone who does.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 12:11:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Even if the singer doesn't have too bad P's, if you put up a valuable mic,
it protects spit on the mic diaphragm, just a reason to put it all the time!


"The Horta" <horta@janus6.org> wrote in message
news:Xns9679A4C08C744hortajanus6org@208.49.80.60...
> Just another newbie question. I see some using them and others not.
>
>
>
> Brendan
>
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 12:11:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

will wrote:
>>yes and no. A good vocalist who doesn't get right up on the mic or hit
>>it with plosives can get by without one. For someone with lesser
>>technique, it will protect your capsule and reduce plosives.
>
>
> Unless you're sure about their level of skill at the mic, I'd just use
> it as a matter of course. Saves headaches.
>

ditto to both remarks....they are indispensable to vocalists with poor
technique....almost useless to properly trained recording artists.

Jonny Durango
June 19, 2005 12:23:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The Horta wrote:
>
> Just another newbie question. I see some using them and others not.
>
> Brendan

yes and no. A good vocalist who doesn't get right up on the mic or hit
it with plosives can get by without one. For someone with lesser
technique, it will protect your capsule and reduce plosives.
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 5:24:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"will" <wpmusic@sio.midco.net> wrote in message
news:1119131666.800683.243420@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> >yes and no. A good vocalist who doesn't get right up on the mic or hit
> >it with plosives can get by without one. For someone with lesser
> >technique, it will protect your capsule and reduce plosives.
>
> Unless you're sure about their level of skill at the mic, I'd just use
> it as a matter of course. Saves headaches.


Protects the mic from spit too. In some cases that alone makes me want to
use it.

Predrag
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 5:24:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"if you put up a valuable mic, it protects spit on the mic diaphragm, just a
reason to put it all the time."

Any singer who has worked with mics alot, knows to sing slightly off axis
when plosives come along.
Doesn't help spit though, but it sure keeps the singer from hugging the mic.





"Jach Mehoff" <wulfye@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:SB2te.13601$Qr3.1504455@news20.bellglobal.com...
> Even if the singer doesn't have too bad P's, if you put up a valuable mic,
> it protects spit on the mic diaphragm, just a reason to put it all the
time!
>
>
> "The Horta" <horta@janus6.org> wrote in message
> news:Xns9679A4C08C744hortajanus6org@208.49.80.60...
> > Just another newbie question. I see some using them and others not.
> >
> >
> >
> > Brendan
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 6:15:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

There is a metal one that costs more money and shoots the air downward
as the sound goes through it. So many people say that one is superior.
I have a regular one, but I'll get that one at some point.
Anonymous
June 19, 2005 9:43:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:

> In article <Xns9679A4C08C744hortajanus6org@208.49.80.60> horta@janus6.org
> writes:
> > Just another newbie question. I see some using them and others not.
>
> If you have pops, use a pop-stopper. If you don't, then you don't need
> one. Some vocalists know how to sing or speak without plosives, others
> need a little help.
>
> And yes, not all pop-stoppers are alike. Some work a lot better than
> others. With some singers, just a little is all you need so "a piece
> of panty hose over a coat hanger worked fine for me" might well be
> true.

You need a more substantial support across the centre than a peripheral
coat hanger can give, to stop the fabric from flexing in the middle when
the air blast hits it. I used a 6" square of wire garden mesh (0.25"
square holes) and coated the wires thinly with latex adhesive to hold
fabric firmly onto it. With a slight curve to give it rigidity, it
works extremely well on a STC 4038 ribbon mic.

If you coat both sides of the mesh and slip it into the seat of a pair
of tights, you get a double material thickness. Then, when the glue
has set, you trim the legs off and put them aside for covering
cylindrical mics should this become necessary.


--
~ Adrian Tuddenham ~
(Remove the ".invalid"s and add ".co.uk" to reply)
www.poppyrecords.co.uk
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 12:06:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1119215716.926678.288540@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> genericaudioperson@hotmail.com writes:

> There is a metal one that costs more money and shoots the air downward
> as the sound goes through it.

That's the one that I first saw from Steadman (are they still in
business?) and probably easier to find today from Royer.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 2:26:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1119127417k@trad...
>
> In article <Xns9679A4C08C744hortajanus6org@208.49.80.60> horta@janus6.org
> writes:
>
>> Just another newbie question. I see some using them and others not.
>
> If you have pops, use a pop-stopper. If you don't, then you don't need
> one. Some vocalists know how to sing or speak without plosives, others
> need a little help.
>
> And yes, not all pop-stoppers are alike. Some work a lot better than
> others.

And no stopper can prevent popping on a crazed singer hell-bent on letting
fly with loud plosives right up close.

geoff
Anonymous
June 25, 2005 1:24:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The Horta wrote:

> Just another newbie question. I see some using them and others not.
>
>
>
> Brendan
>

I'd get the mic out of the breath stream. FWIW,
I've used a placement about 18 inches away from
the singer, above the head, with the (side adress)
mic pointed at their forehead. These were loud
singers, though...

This'll also cause the singer to raise the chin,
which makes most folks sing better.

Ain't against 'em, but to me. being clever about
placement is a better tactic.

--
Les Cargill
Anonymous
June 25, 2005 10:29:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Fri, 24 Jun 2005 21:24:33 GMT, Les Cargill <lNOcargill@cfl.Arr.com>
wrote:

>This'll also cause the singer to raise the chin,
>which makes most folks sing better.

Let's stamp on this one. Raising the chin makes anybody sing worse. It
stresses the vocal cords and limits the intensity of sound badly. Go
to any reputable singing teacher or voice coach, and "keep the chin
down" is one of the first lessons you will get.

d

Pearce Consulting
http://www.pearce.uk.com
Anonymous
June 25, 2005 6:00:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Don Pearce wrote:

> On Fri, 24 Jun 2005 21:24:33 GMT, Les Cargill <lNOcargill@cfl.Arr.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>>This'll also cause the singer to raise the chin,
>>which makes most folks sing better.
>
>
> Let's stamp on this one. Raising the chin makes anybody sing worse. It
> stresses the vocal cords and limits the intensity of sound badly. Go
> to any reputable singing teacher or voice coach, and "keep the chin
> down" is one of the first lessons you will get.
>
> d
>
> Pearce Consulting
> http://www.pearce.uk.com

Thanks for the correction. I'd actually learned this from a
school choir director.

--
Les Cargill
Anonymous
June 25, 2005 7:18:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Les Cargill <lNOcargill@cfl.Arr.com> wrote in news:Srdve.186089$w15.48496
@tornado.tampabay.rr.com:

>> Let's stamp on this one. Raising the chin makes anybody sing worse. It
>> stresses the vocal cords and limits the intensity of sound badly. Go
>> to any reputable singing teacher or voice coach, and "keep the chin
>> down" is one of the first lessons you will get.
>
> Thanks for the correction. I'd actually learned this from a
> school choir director.

If keeping your chin up also keeps you from slumping, it's OK. Good
posture means better back support (the power singing muscles are in your
lower back) and more room to expand your lungs (shoulders back). Then put
your chin down and relax your jaw.
!