Sign-in / Sign-up
Your question

MS Flight Simulator for MSDOS

Tags:
  • CD-Rom
  • MS-DOS
  • Games
  • Microsoft
  • Windows XP
  • Video Games
Last response: in PC Gaming
Anonymous
October 12, 2004 2:37:48 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.games.zone.simulation (More info?)

I have the CD for Microsoft Flight Simulator
for MSDOS and I was wondering if there is anyway
to load or run it on WIN XP Operating System ?

More about : flight simulator msdos

Anonymous
October 12, 2004 6:06:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.games.zone.simulation (More info?)

I remember that the DOS versions needed Expanded Memory access for the
sound. I don't know with any certanty if a Windows XP virtual machine
can be configured to allow an application to access the Expanded Memory.
I had to modify the main CONFIG.SYS file to enable expanded memory
access when I ran FS 5.1 under Windows 95.

If you have any of the big box computer or office supply chains in your
area see if they have any of the older versions at a discount. I have
seen Flight Simulator for Windows 95 and Flight Simulator 98 in seperate
jewel boxes for less than $10 US each. I have also seen a combo package
with Flight Simulator 98 and the original Combat Flight Simulator for
less than $20 US. I have even seen the 2000 and 2002 versions in card
stock packaging for under $20. these windows versions would be a lot
easier to get running in addition to the improved graphics.

gmv wrote:
> I have the CD for Microsoft Flight Simulator
> for MSDOS and I was wondering if there is anyway
> to load or run it on WIN XP Operating System ?
>
>
>
Anonymous
October 13, 2004 6:56:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.games.zone.simulation (More info?)

If you can make a pif file in Win XP you can control
what type of memory is used for whatever EXE file
to be used. Or so it seems.
You make a pif file by right clicking on the exe file
and changing the properties then if you change
anything at all a pif file is created.
Then you run the exe file by clicking on the pif
file which has a MSDOS logo/icon with the same name
as the exe file.
It will let you play with memory types and amounts.
EMS XMS expanded and extended memories etc...
And all this time I thought Win XP would not work with
MSDOS.



"RobertVA" <robert_c72@nospamhotmail.com> wrote in message news:o Q3w0YIsEHA.3896@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>I remember that the DOS versions needed Expanded Memory access for the sound. I don't know with any certanty if a Windows XP
>virtual machine can be configured to allow an application to access the Expanded Memory. I had to modify the main CONFIG.SYS file
>to enable expanded memory access when I ran FS 5.1 under Windows 95.
>
> If you have any of the big box computer or office supply chains in your area see if they have any of the older versions at a
> discount. I have seen Flight Simulator for Windows 95 and Flight Simulator 98 in seperate jewel boxes for less than $10 US each. I
> have also seen a combo package with Flight Simulator 98 and the original Combat Flight Simulator for less than $20 US. I have even
> seen the 2000 and 2002 versions in card stock packaging for under $20. these windows versions would be a lot easier to get running
> in addition to the improved graphics.
>
> gmv wrote:
>> I have the CD for Microsoft Flight Simulator
>> for MSDOS and I was wondering if there is anyway
>> to load or run it on WIN XP Operating System ?
>>
>>
>>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
October 13, 2004 8:19:21 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.games.zone.simulation (More info?)

DOS didn't always provide the services some applications required. As a
result some applications bypassed the operating system and directly
manipulated the computer's hardware. Under DOS a program normally had
exclusive use of the computer and this "hands on" approach didn't
ussually cause problems. In the multiple application Windows enviroment
that approach can lead to serious consequences ranging from application
shutdowns to shutdown/lockup of the entire operating system. Windows 9x
had a DOS Mode that provided a single application enviroment for
programs that needed exclusive use of the computer. Such programs were
so old by the time Windows XP was released that exclusive mode was
discontinued. Programs in DOS or DOS mode wouldn't be able to access the
NTFS file system on many Windows NT or Windows XP hard disk partitions
either.

The default settings in my Windows 98 installation resulted in expanded
memory not being available to DOS applications running in virtual
machines, even when shortcut/pif properties were set to allow it.
Apparently Windows couldn't provide access to expanded memory for the
virtual machines because it wasn't configured to have access to expanded
memory itself. The virtual machines were also only makeing about 590 KB
of conventional RAM available to the application. Some applications
required 605 KB or more.

Windows 95 and 98 would respond properly to the same CONFIG.SYS commands
that made expanded memory available under DOS 6. Furthermore, Windows
responded to commands to shift the DOS kernal and 16 bit device drivers
to available Upper Memory blocks, making more conventional memory
available to the DOS application running in the virtual machine. The
expanded memory permisions in the shortcut/pif properties would only
work on my system after these CONFIG.SYS adjustments.

Shortcuts for DOS mode shortcuts needed some massaging as well. The
default DOS mode configuration not only lacked expanded memory support,
it didn't permit use of the CD ROM drive. I ussually hand edited
shortcut specific CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT "files" for those, but
could have used regedit to add checkboxes for those functions to the
properties popup. The procedure was spelled out in books titled "Mother
of All Windows 95 Books" and "Mother of All Windows 98 Books" that I had
purchased at a chain bookstore. In addition to a lot of usefull
information these books had a lot of amuseing sidebars.

gmv wrote:

> If you can make a pif file in Win XP you can control
> what type of memory is used for whatever EXE file
> to be used. Or so it seems.
> You make a pif file by right clicking on the exe file
> and changing the properties then if you change
> anything at all a pif file is created.
> Then you run the exe file by clicking on the pif
> file which has a MSDOS logo/icon with the same name
> as the exe file.
> It will let you play with memory types and amounts.
> EMS XMS expanded and extended memories etc...
> And all this time I thought Win XP would not work with
> MSDOS.
>
>
>
> "RobertVA" <robert_c72@nospamhotmail.com> wrote in message news:o Q3w0YIsEHA.3896@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
>>I remember that the DOS versions needed Expanded Memory access for the sound. I don't know with any certanty if a Windows XP
>>virtual machine can be configured to allow an application to access the Expanded Memory. I had to modify the main CONFIG.SYS file
>>to enable expanded memory access when I ran FS 5.1 under Windows 95.
>>
>>If you have any of the big box computer or office supply chains in your area see if they have any of the older versions at a
>>discount. I have seen Flight Simulator for Windows 95 and Flight Simulator 98 in seperate jewel boxes for less than $10 US each. I
>>have also seen a combo package with Flight Simulator 98 and the original Combat Flight Simulator for less than $20 US. I have even
>>seen the 2000 and 2002 versions in card stock packaging for under $20. these windows versions would be a lot easier to get running
>>in addition to the improved graphics.
>>
>>gmv wrote:
>>
>>>I have the CD for Microsoft Flight Simulator
>>>for MSDOS and I was wondering if there is anyway
>>>to load or run it on WIN XP Operating System ?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
October 15, 2004 11:19:34 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.games.zone.simulation (More info?)

I was able to get the MS Flight Sim 5 for DOS to work
in Windows XP but the frame rates were all wrong
Audio Video everything seemed to work but the frame rates
were all wrong everything moved in doubletime or
quadrupletime everything moved too fast to be real.
To run it after installing I just made a pif file that
set the EMS and XMS to auto then I selected 256 colors
for the video display all this in the pif file for
Win XP. I ran the FS5.com program using the pif file
which shows up with an MSDOS Icon after you create it.
It sure came came close to working but was not
playable in its super speed condition.
Windows XP comes very close to being a great OS
if only the MSDOS stuff were 100% compatable.
MS needs to do with its FS5 what ID did with the
original doom to make it work on Win XP then you could
have an old program with the WTC on it again.
I would crash sim planes into the WTC years before
those terrorists did it for real.
These Simulators are great for trying things you would never
try in real life.
Too bad the FS5 program will not run right on Win XP.
Whatever is supposed to control the time rate is mucked up
and does not work right.


"RobertVA" <robert_c72@nospamhotmail.com> wrote in message news:ei1ItHWsEHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> DOS didn't always provide the services some applications required. As a result some applications bypassed the operating system and
> directly manipulated the computer's hardware. Under DOS a program normally had exclusive use of the computer and this "hands on"
> approach didn't ussually cause problems. In the multiple application Windows enviroment that approach can lead to serious
> consequences ranging from application shutdowns to shutdown/lockup of the entire operating system. Windows 9x had a DOS Mode that
> provided a single application enviroment for programs that needed exclusive use of the computer. Such programs were so old by the
> time Windows XP was released that exclusive mode was discontinued. Programs in DOS or DOS mode wouldn't be able to access the NTFS
> file system on many Windows NT or Windows XP hard disk partitions either.
>
> The default settings in my Windows 98 installation resulted in expanded memory not being available to DOS applications running in
> virtual machines, even when shortcut/pif properties were set to allow it. Apparently Windows couldn't provide access to expanded
> memory for the virtual machines because it wasn't configured to have access to expanded memory itself. The virtual machines were
> also only makeing about 590 KB of conventional RAM available to the application. Some applications required 605 KB or more.
>
> Windows 95 and 98 would respond properly to the same CONFIG.SYS commands that made expanded memory available under DOS 6.
> Furthermore, Windows responded to commands to shift the DOS kernal and 16 bit device drivers to available Upper Memory blocks,
> making more conventional memory available to the DOS application running in the virtual machine. The expanded memory permisions in
> the shortcut/pif properties would only work on my system after these CONFIG.SYS adjustments.
>
> Shortcuts for DOS mode shortcuts needed some massaging as well. The default DOS mode configuration not only lacked expanded memory
> support, it didn't permit use of the CD ROM drive. I ussually hand edited shortcut specific CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT "files"
> for those, but could have used regedit to add checkboxes for those functions to the properties popup. The procedure was spelled
> out in books titled "Mother of All Windows 95 Books" and "Mother of All Windows 98 Books" that I had purchased at a chain
> bookstore. In addition to a lot of usefull information these books had a lot of amuseing sidebars.
>
> gmv wrote:
>
>> If you can make a pif file in Win XP you can control
>> what type of memory is used for whatever EXE file
>> to be used. Or so it seems.
>> You make a pif file by right clicking on the exe file
>> and changing the properties then if you change
>> anything at all a pif file is created.
>> Then you run the exe file by clicking on the pif
>> file which has a MSDOS logo/icon with the same name
>> as the exe file.
>> It will let you play with memory types and amounts.
>> EMS XMS expanded and extended memories etc...
>> And all this time I thought Win XP would not work with
>> MSDOS.
>>
>>
>>
>> "RobertVA" <robert_c72@nospamhotmail.com> wrote in message news:o Q3w0YIsEHA.3896@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>
>>>I remember that the DOS versions needed Expanded Memory access for the sound. I don't know with any certanty if a Windows XP
>>>virtual machine can be configured to allow an application to access the Expanded Memory. I had to modify the main CONFIG.SYS file
>>>to enable expanded memory access when I ran FS 5.1 under Windows 95.
>>>
>>>If you have any of the big box computer or office supply chains in your area see if they have any of the older versions at a
>>>discount. I have seen Flight Simulator for Windows 95 and Flight Simulator 98 in seperate jewel boxes for less than $10 US each.
>>>I have also seen a combo package with Flight Simulator 98 and the original Combat Flight Simulator for less than $20 US. I have
>>>even seen the 2000 and 2002 versions in card stock packaging for under $20. these windows versions would be a lot easier to get
>>>running in addition to the improved graphics.
>>>
>>>gmv wrote:
>>>
>>>>I have the CD for Microsoft Flight Simulator
>>>>for MSDOS and I was wondering if there is anyway
>>>>to load or run it on WIN XP Operating System ?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
October 15, 2004 4:59:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.games.zone.simulation (More info?)

Apparently whatever method FS 5 uses to pace itself doesn't have the
capability to wait during the many idle clock cycles made available by
the faster CPU. This is really an application problem rather than an OS
problem. You appear to be indicating that ID updated Doom to run under
Windows. Microsoft did the same thing, by producing later versions of
Flight Simulator that have better abilities to handle, and take
advantage of, faster CPUs. On my Windows XP system the early Windows
versions are attempting to display frames so quickly the two digit frame
rate counter can't display the frame rate! Despite all this speed,
events in the simulator appear to progress at a realistic rate. Three of
these versions have NYC scenery depicting lower Manhattan shortly prior
to their release dates.

Some aspects of DOS compatability are part of what made Windows 9x/ME so
unstable. As Windows NT(2000 was NT version 5) was a different OS,
Microsoft was able to market it with a Command Line window that lacked
some of DOS's more troublesome annoyances. Windows XP (Home AND
Profesional) is derived from Windows 2000 and has a similar Command Line
window with the same intentional limitations. Most Apple Macintoshes
woun't run Apple ][ versions of Sublogic Flight Simulator either
(produced by the same programming team as early versions marketed under
the Microsoft label). Tried putting an N64 cartrage in a Gamecube
lately? Nintendo had a series of three completely incompatable cartrage
based consoles before going to their current optical disk based
configuration. Each generation had different controllers too. And
Gamecube can't play music CDs or DVDs the way Playstation 2 and Xbox can.

gmv wrote:

> I was able to get the MS Flight Sim 5 for DOS to work
> in Windows XP but the frame rates were all wrong
> Audio Video everything seemed to work but the frame rates
> were all wrong everything moved in doubletime or
> quadrupletime everything moved too fast to be real.
> To run it after installing I just made a pif file that
> set the EMS and XMS to auto then I selected 256 colors
> for the video display all this in the pif file for
> Win XP. I ran the FS5.com program using the pif file
> which shows up with an MSDOS Icon after you create it.
> It sure came came close to working but was not
> playable in its super speed condition.
> Windows XP comes very close to being a great OS
> if only the MSDOS stuff were 100% compatable.
> MS needs to do with its FS5 what ID did with the
> original doom to make it work on Win XP then you could
> have an old program with the WTC on it again.
> I would crash sim planes into the WTC years before
> those terrorists did it for real.
> These Simulators are great for trying things you would never
> try in real life.
> Too bad the FS5 program will not run right on Win XP.
> Whatever is supposed to control the time rate is mucked up
> and does not work right.
>
>
> "RobertVA" <robert_c72@nospamhotmail.com> wrote in message news:ei1ItHWsEHA.2664@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>
>>DOS didn't always provide the services some applications required. As a result some applications bypassed the operating system and
>>directly manipulated the computer's hardware. Under DOS a program normally had exclusive use of the computer and this "hands on"
>>approach didn't ussually cause problems. In the multiple application Windows enviroment that approach can lead to serious
>>consequences ranging from application shutdowns to shutdown/lockup of the entire operating system. Windows 9x had a DOS Mode that
>>provided a single application enviroment for programs that needed exclusive use of the computer. Such programs were so old by the
>>time Windows XP was released that exclusive mode was discontinued. Programs in DOS or DOS mode wouldn't be able to access the NTFS
>>file system on many Windows NT or Windows XP hard disk partitions either.
>>
>>The default settings in my Windows 98 installation resulted in expanded memory not being available to DOS applications running in
>>virtual machines, even when shortcut/pif properties were set to allow it. Apparently Windows couldn't provide access to expanded
>>memory for the virtual machines because it wasn't configured to have access to expanded memory itself. The virtual machines were
>>also only makeing about 590 KB of conventional RAM available to the application. Some applications required 605 KB or more.
>>
>>Windows 95 and 98 would respond properly to the same CONFIG.SYS commands that made expanded memory available under DOS 6.
>>Furthermore, Windows responded to commands to shift the DOS kernal and 16 bit device drivers to available Upper Memory blocks,
>>making more conventional memory available to the DOS application running in the virtual machine. The expanded memory permisions in
>>the shortcut/pif properties would only work on my system after these CONFIG.SYS adjustments.
>>
>>Shortcuts for DOS mode shortcuts needed some massaging as well. The default DOS mode configuration not only lacked expanded memory
>>support, it didn't permit use of the CD ROM drive. I ussually hand edited shortcut specific CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT "files"
>>for those, but could have used regedit to add checkboxes for those functions to the properties popup. The procedure was spelled
>>out in books titled "Mother of All Windows 95 Books" and "Mother of All Windows 98 Books" that I had purchased at a chain
>>bookstore. In addition to a lot of usefull information these books had a lot of amuseing sidebars.
>>
>>gmv wrote:
>>
>>
>>>If you can make a pif file in Win XP you can control
>>>what type of memory is used for whatever EXE file
>>>to be used. Or so it seems.
>>>You make a pif file by right clicking on the exe file
>>>and changing the properties then if you change
>>>anything at all a pif file is created.
>>>Then you run the exe file by clicking on the pif
>>>file which has a MSDOS logo/icon with the same name
>>>as the exe file.
>>>It will let you play with memory types and amounts.
>>>EMS XMS expanded and extended memories etc...
>>>And all this time I thought Win XP would not work with
>>>MSDOS.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>"RobertVA" <robert_c72@nospamhotmail.com> wrote in message news:o Q3w0YIsEHA.3896@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>>
>>>
>>>>I remember that the DOS versions needed Expanded Memory access for the sound. I don't know with any certanty if a Windows XP
>>>>virtual machine can be configured to allow an application to access the Expanded Memory. I had to modify the main CONFIG.SYS file
>>>>to enable expanded memory access when I ran FS 5.1 under Windows 95.
>>>>
>>>>If you have any of the big box computer or office supply chains in your area see if they have any of the older versions at a
>>>>discount. I have seen Flight Simulator for Windows 95 and Flight Simulator 98 in seperate jewel boxes for less than $10 US each.
>>>>I have also seen a combo package with Flight Simulator 98 and the original Combat Flight Simulator for less than $20 US. I have
>>>>even seen the 2000 and 2002 versions in card stock packaging for under $20. these windows versions would be a lot easier to get
>>>>running in addition to the improved graphics.
>>>>
>>>>gmv wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I have the CD for Microsoft Flight Simulator
>>>>>for MSDOS and I was wondering if there is anyway
>>>>>to load or run it on WIN XP Operating System ?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>
>
October 16, 2004 6:48:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.games.zone.simulation (More info?)

One potential way to run DOS programs on a windows XP machine is to run a
"virtual DOS machine". Check out VMWare to set up a virtual machine at
www.vmware.com. You do need to have a licensed copy of DOS to use this
technique.

"gmv" <noemail@please.123> wrote in message
news:0uOad.166135$wV.60149@attbi_s54...
>I have the CD for Microsoft Flight Simulator
> for MSDOS and I was wondering if there is anyway
> to load or run it on WIN XP Operating System ?
>
>
>
>