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Music Career 101?

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Anonymous
June 22, 2005 5:58:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I own and run a small independant recording studio. I have a lot of my time
wasted by people making appointments to see me and then asking "Can't you
record me and then I'll pay you when I've sold all my copies?". Very often
these are people who have not even recorded a demo and do not know how to
play a musical instrument. They often will show me the lyrics to their
"hits".

I am looking for articles and magazines which I can leave in the waiting
room which deal with how to develop a music career and other important
skills muscians should have. Maybe even some inexpensive books which I
could sell.

At the moment I just have some Guitar, Keyboard etc. magazines. (These do
have one or two good articles but are mostly advertizing for stuff which
these kids cant afford.)

Anthony Gosnell

More about : music career 101

Anonymous
June 22, 2005 5:58:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

anthony.gosnell <livewire@metroweb.nospam.co.za> wrote:
>I own and run a small independant recording studio. I have a lot of my time
>wasted by people making appointments to see me and then asking "Can't you
>record me and then I'll pay you when I've sold all my copies?". Very often
>these are people who have not even recorded a demo and do not know how to
>play a musical instrument. They often will show me the lyrics to their
>"hits".
>
>I am looking for articles and magazines which I can leave in the waiting
>room which deal with how to develop a music career and other important
>skills muscians should have. Maybe even some inexpensive books which I
>could sell.

Take the relevant scene from Boogie Nights and put it on continuous
repeat on a monitor in the waiting room.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
June 22, 2005 5:58:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> I am looking for articles and magazines which I can leave in the waiting
> room which deal with how to develop a music career and other important
> skills muscians should have. Maybe even some inexpensive books which I
> could sell.

To make a small fortune as a musician...

... start with a large fortune.
Related resources
June 23, 2005 9:01:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

how about offering to teach them all the other bits of the music
business necessary to actually having some chance to make money from
music . . . the recording studio bit is only one part of the job.
Either teach them yourself, or find others who can . . . why not do
them a favour, and yourself, at the same time . . . if they think that
all they have to do is go to a recording studio, and the money will
then keep comming in, they won't get very far and won't come back to
you for album no. 2 . . . there's stuff they NEED to know, and they
won't value it if they just read it for free . . . it would be easy
enough to organise some good reading material on how to actually make
money from music . . . there's plenty of it on the net . . . if they
can't be bothered to look (or think) for themselves, then they NEED
you, or someone else, to help give them a chance.

just an idea :) )

Chris
(REAL strings for realistic prices
http://www.chris-melchior.com/strings.htm)
Anonymous
June 24, 2005 3:15:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Scott Dorsey" <kludge@panix.com> wrote
> >I am looking for articles and magazines which I can leave in the waiting
> >room which deal with how to develop a music career and other important
> >skills muscians should have. Maybe even some inexpensive books which I
> >could sell.
>
> Take the relevant scene from Boogie Nights and put it on continuous
> repeat on a monitor in the waiting room.
> --scott

Brilliant. Now how do I arrange it so that I don't have to see it every
time I go into the waiting room?

Anthony Gosnell
Anonymous
June 24, 2005 6:28:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<chris@chris-melchior.com> wrote
> how about offering to teach them all the other bits of the music
> business necessary to actually having some chance to make money from
> music . . . the recording studio bit is only one part of the job.
> Either teach them yourself, or find others who can . . .

I think there is a need for a consolodated approach. I want to have free
articles which they can read in the waiting room, a free newsletter and
books which I can sell to them if they are at all serious. But I also quite
like your idea and have a career day once a month and one on one coaching
for a small fee.

At the moment I give them a short lecture on the facts of life and try to
get them to take some piano or guitar lessons from a friend of mine.
Unfortunately the short lecture can take quite long when you realize that
they don't have even the most basic understanding of economics or business
or anything.

Anthony Gosnell
Anonymous
June 27, 2005 2:02:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

anthony.gosnell wrote:
> I own and run a small independant recording studio. I have a lot of my time
> wasted by people making appointments to see me and then asking "Can't you
> record me and then I'll pay you when I've sold all my copies?". Very often
> these are people who have not even recorded a demo and do not know how to
> play a musical instrument. They often will show me the lyrics to their
> "hits".
>
> I am looking for articles and magazines which I can leave in the waiting
> room which deal with how to develop a music career and other important
> skills muscians should have. Maybe even some inexpensive books which I
> could sell.
>
> At the moment I just have some Guitar, Keyboard etc. magazines. (These do
> have one or two good articles but are mostly advertizing for stuff which
> these kids cant afford.)
>
> Anthony Gosnell
>

Some studios will agree to taking points on a release in lieu of up front payment for studio time.
However, it sounds like your situation is a bit different, having people come in and want to talk
about how great they are... if they just get the "juice" from someone else.

Perhaps you could screen people over the phone to find their intentions. Perhaps questions along the
lines of:

"What are you looking to accomplish?"
"Do you have your songs finished and charted?"
"Will you need musicians for your session?"

And so on.

Also, perhaps it would be good that, during this conversation on the phone, you let them know your
studio does not do work on "spec" or take points on future potential sales in lieu of payment for
studio time. It may save you the grief and wasted time they consume coming into the studio to say
these things.

--fletch
!