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studio vs. live recording

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June 23, 2005 12:49:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I love the isolation and clarity of a studio recording, but the energy
and feeling of a live one. How can I get the energy and vibe of a live
sound in a studio mix? This is for a hard rock band.

More about : studio live recording

Anonymous
June 23, 2005 1:55:00 PM

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Beer/ Gobos/Friends ???
"Josh" <googlemyass@undertone.com> wrote in message
news:1119541761.224838.239520@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>I love the isolation and clarity of a studio recording, but the energy
> and feeling of a live one. How can I get the energy and vibe of a live
> sound in a studio mix? This is for a hard rock band.
>
Anonymous
June 23, 2005 1:58:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:
> In article <1119541761.224838.239520@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> Josh <googlemyass@undertone.com> wrote:
> >I love the isolation and clarity of a studio recording, but the energy
> >and feeling of a live one. How can I get the energy and vibe of a live
> >sound in a studio mix? This is for a hard rock band.
>
> Put everyone together in a big room and have them play together. You
> may need to sacrifice some isolation, and you may need to compromise
> and retrack some things (especially vocals) but the point is that by
> playing together you maintain the groove where the performers can work
> together and riff off of each other.
> --scott

Indeed this is (or at least *was*) done for quite a bit of rock
recording. Some setups I worked on and others that I saw being done had
the guitars and bass in the room together with the drums, but their
amps were in iso rooms, and everyone was on headphones. I think it's a
reasonable compromise so that a good degree of isolation is acheived,
but the rhythm players feel the live drums in their guts and everyone
has eye contact. I've always felt that it's pretty impossible to play
any kind of music without those things. Of course it's done, but IMO
there's alway something missing.

Karl Winkler
Lectrosonics, Inc.
http://www.lectrosonics.com
Related resources
Anonymous
June 23, 2005 2:06:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Josh wrote:
> I love the isolation and clarity of a studio recording, but the energy
> and feeling of a live one. How can I get the energy and vibe of a live
> sound in a studio mix? This is for a hard rock band.


Check out the way Garth Richardson tracks things some times. Everyone
together in the same room, amps sealed away somewere ( iso box or other
room), no headphones. Uses a PA for all the monitoring. just like
playing a show for the band. He trys to use phase canceling to keep it
outta the drum mics.

Its a pretty crazy set up. I probably wouldnt atempt it. But it you had
a place to set up were you could afford the time to "trial and error"
you could probably get some good results.

nace
Anonymous
June 23, 2005 2:10:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hello Josh,

Most of what I record are live performances, a couple sessions from
rehearsals, and only a few isolated individual tracks projects.

We'll tap off of either a couple banks of DI-800's (Link or unbalanced
Outs) at the stage or off a patch panel at the FOH booth. We'll try
to get each source on it's own track but sometimes need to do some
submixing. A couple room mics are included. The easiest is when the
room mics alone get a good grab of the entire number. Electronic drums
are clean to work with but a couple overheads will work. Gets
cumbersome sometimes if effects are added downstream from the taps. A
touch of audience in the mix can be good...

Regards,
Andy
Anonymous
June 23, 2005 4:07:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1119541761.224838.239520@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
Josh <googlemyass@undertone.com> wrote:
>I love the isolation and clarity of a studio recording, but the energy
>and feeling of a live one. How can I get the energy and vibe of a live
>sound in a studio mix? This is for a hard rock band.

Put everyone together in a big room and have them play together. You
may need to sacrifice some isolation, and you may need to compromise
and retrack some things (especially vocals) but the point is that by
playing together you maintain the groove where the performers can work
together and riff off of each other.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
June 23, 2005 8:01:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

well hell... We recorded our tracks all in the same room together, amps
turned down a bit to reduce bleed, threw out those as scratch tracks
and then overdubbed everything onto the drums. My mixes end up sounding
sterile. Too clean. Take a listen and maybe you can tell me what I am
doing wrong:

http://www.turntofall.com
Anonymous
June 23, 2005 9:11:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Scott Dorsey" <kludge@panix.com> wrote in message
news:D 9emo4$pev$1@panix2.panix.com...
> In article <1119541761.224838.239520@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> Josh <googlemyass@undertone.com> wrote:
> >I love the isolation and clarity of a studio recording, but the energy
> >and feeling of a live one. How can I get the energy and vibe of a live
> >sound in a studio mix? This is for a hard rock band.
>
> Put everyone together in a big room and have them play together. You
> may need to sacrifice some isolation, and you may need to compromise
> and retrack some things (especially vocals) but the point is that by
> playing together you maintain the groove where the performers can work
> together and riff off of each other.

And bring a small audience into the studio.

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
June 23, 2005 11:20:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Josh <googlemyass@undertone.com> wrote:
>well hell... We recorded our tracks all in the same room together, amps
>turned down a bit to reduce bleed, threw out those as scratch tracks
>and then overdubbed everything onto the drums. My mixes end up sounding
>sterile. Too clean. Take a listen and maybe you can tell me what I am
>doing wrong:

What you're doing wrong is overdubbing everything and throwing out the
original tracks. The bleed is your friend and properly used, the bleed
can help the sound a lot. And the overdubs never have quite the same
feel as the original track.

Try making a mix from the scratch tracks and then one from the overdubs
and compare the two.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
June 24, 2005 9:32:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Josh" <googlemyass@undertone.com> wrote in message news:1119567670.586961.131020@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> well hell... We recorded our tracks all in the same room together, amps
> turned down a bit to reduce bleed, threw out those as scratch tracks
> and then overdubbed everything onto the drums. My mixes end up sounding
> sterile. Too clean. Take a listen and maybe you can tell me what I am
> doing wrong:
>
> http://www.turntofall.com
>

I don't have to hear it to know that "groove" can only come when the
whole band is jamming together.
June 24, 2005 9:32:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <pVMue.5460$G4.568@trnddc09>, MAMS\ <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com>
wrote:

> I don't have to hear it to know that "groove" can only come when the
> whole band is jamming together.




I've found that guys who play a lot together live can lay great grooves
even while overdubbing.

And the best acoustic rhythm guitar track I ever recorded was cut as an
overdub last holiday season. It's feel is stunning.

The guy who played it (Stu Kimball) had spent the year touring with
Dylan. And it was at the end of a long day of overdubs to boot!




David Correia
Celebration Sound
Warren, Rhode Island

CelebrationSound@aol.com
www.CelebrationSound.com
Anonymous
June 24, 2005 9:33:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Josh" <googlemyass@undertone.com> wrote in message news:1119541761.224838.239520@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> I love the isolation and clarity of a studio recording, but the energy
> and feeling of a live one. How can I get the energy and vibe of a live
> sound in a studio mix? This is for a hard rock band.


What studios have you tried? What live venues have you recorded in?


--
David Morgan (MAMS)
http://www.m-a-m-s DOT com
Morgan Audio Media Service
Dallas, Texas (214) 662-9901
_______________________________________
http://www.artisan-recordingstudio.com
Anonymous
June 24, 2005 3:46:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Josh" <googlemyass@undertone.com> wrote
> I love the isolation and clarity of a studio recording, but the energy
> and feeling of a live one. How can I get the energy and vibe of a live
> sound in a studio mix? This is for a hard rock band.

Invite a whole lot of groupies into the control room for the recording
sessions.

Anthony Gosnell
Anonymous
June 24, 2005 5:14:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"David Morgan (MAMS)" wrote:

> I don't have to hear it to know that "groove" can only come when the
> whole band is jamming together.

The Beatles recorded Abbey Road in overdub mode. I thought that record had a cool vibe and a groove.

PapaNate
Anonymous
June 24, 2005 9:26:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Papanate" <nospamagain@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:42BC0754.30779345@nc.rr.com...
> "David Morgan (MAMS)" wrote:
>
> > I don't have to hear it to know that "groove" can only come when the
> > whole band is jamming together.
>
> The Beatles recorded Abbey Road in overdub mode. I thought that record had
a cool vibe and a groove.
>
> PapaNate


It's easier with 10 albums under the belt.

Predrag
Anonymous
June 24, 2005 9:26:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Fri, 24 Jun 2005 17:26:15 +0200, Predrag Trpkov wrote:

> "Papanate" <nospamagain@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
>> The Beatles recorded Abbey Road in overdub mode. I thought that record
>> had a cool vibe and a groove.
>
>
> It's easier with 10 albums under the belt.

It's also a lot easier with Sir George at the helm & Emerick at the desk.

And being the Beatles probably didn't hurt.
Anonymous
June 25, 2005 9:35:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"david" <ihate@spamo.com> wrote in message news:240620050417389578%ihate@spamo.com...
> In article <pVMue.5460$G4.568@trnddc09>, MAMS\ <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com>
> wrote:
>
> > I don't have to hear it to know that "groove" can only come when the
> > whole band is jamming together.
>
>
>
>
> I've found that guys who play a lot together live can lay great grooves
> even while overdubbing.
>
> And the best acoustic rhythm guitar track I ever recorded was cut as an
> overdub last holiday season. It's feel is stunning.
>
> The guy who played it (Stu Kimball) had spent the year touring with
> Dylan. And it was at the end of a long day of overdubs to boot!


Shows to go ya'.... there is no substitute for talent. ;-)
!