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How remove guitar picking sound from Amp recording ?

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July 8, 2005 1:45:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi I am holding a microphone about 18" away from my 4x12 speaker
cabinet and recording my electric guitar. On the recordings I hear
myself picking in the background..any ideas how to avoid having this
sound being picked up ? I cant turn it up louder since its already
picking up the sound fine, anymore might ruin the recording - should I
move the mike to be 6" from the speaker to drown out my picking ?? How
do folks get around this ??

Thanks!

Jack
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 1:53:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

(I can hear your picking three times!)

Try increasing the volume on your amp while reducing the gain for your
microphone, or better, try getting a longer cord, or some isolation between
your picking and the microphone.

This is obvious isn't it?


"Jack" <jack_posemsky@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1120841136.172238.16240@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Hi I am holding a microphone about 18" away from my 4x12 speaker
> cabinet and recording my electric guitar. On the recordings I hear
> myself picking in the background..any ideas how to avoid having this
> sound being picked up ? I cant turn it up louder since its already
> picking up the sound fine, anymore might ruin the recording - should I
> move the mike to be 6" from the speaker to drown out my picking ?? How
> do folks get around this ??
>
> Thanks!
>
> Jack
>
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 6:50:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Laurence Payne wrote:

> Turning up the amp will have the same effect as bringing the
> microphone closer to the speaker. Why would either ruin the
> recording? There's a gain control on your mic input, isn't there?



??? I don't have any amp around here that sounds exactly the same on
5 that it does on 6. Turning the amp up and moving the mic closer will
both change the sound. Won't ruin it, but it will certainly not stay
the same. The mic gain only compensates for the change in level in
this case, which won't make it sound like the amp not as loud and the
mic not as close.


If you want to not change the sound you just gotta move the picker
farther from the mic. If your extra long cable dulls the sound, grab
a pedal that serves up a buffered signal in hard bypass.

V
Related resources
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 10:20:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 8 Jul 2005 09:45:36 -0700, "Jack" <jack_posemsky@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Hi I am holding a microphone about 18" away from my 4x12 speaker
>cabinet and recording my electric guitar. On the recordings I hear
>myself picking in the background..any ideas how to avoid having this
>sound being picked up ? I cant turn it up louder since its already
>picking up the sound fine, anymore might ruin the recording - should I
>move the mike to be 6" from the speaker to drown out my picking ?? How
>do folks get around this ??

Turning up the amp will have the same effect as bringing the
microphone closer to the speaker. Why would either ruin the
recording? There's a gain control on your mic input, isn't there?

Alternatively, take the guitar further away frm the mic.
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 10:21:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jack wrote:
> Hi I am holding a microphone about 18" away from my 4x12 speaker
> cabinet and recording my electric guitar. On the recordings I hear
> myself picking in the background..any ideas how to avoid having this
> sound being picked up ? I cant turn it up louder since its already
> picking up the sound fine, anymore might ruin the recording - should I
> move the mike to be 6" from the speaker to drown out my picking ?? How
> do folks get around this ??
>
> Thanks!
>
> Jack
>
Why not just turn around with your back to the mic?

Wayne
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 10:55:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Use a longer cord.

Oh, and by the way, some folks like to mic the guitar itself because they
*want* the pick and body noise. Not my style either, but thought I'd mention
it.

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 1:53:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Depends also on what kind of mic you are using. If you are using a
cardioid (directional) mic, you want to have your guitar in the "null"
- the part of the fileed where the mic is least sensitive. If you can
ocate yourself and point the mick so that the ass end is pointed
toward the guitar you will minimize pick noise. You may still get some
echoing off the walls of the room however.

If you do not know what I am talking about, start doing some reading
about basic recording technique.


On 8 Jul 2005 09:45:36 -0700, "Jack" <jack_posemsky@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Hi I am holding a microphone about 18" away from my 4x12 speaker
>cabinet and recording my electric guitar. On the recordings I hear
>myself picking in the background..any ideas how to avoid having this
>sound being picked up ? I cant turn it up louder since its already
>picking up the sound fine, anymore might ruin the recording - should I
>move the mike to be 6" from the speaker to drown out my picking ?? How
>do folks get around this ??
>
>Thanks!
>
>Jack
>
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 2:20:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<vdubreeze@earthlink.net> wrote in message ...

> If your extra long cable dulls the sound...

You've got a bad cable (or one that's 100 feet too long).


> grab a pedal that serves up a buffered signal in hard bypass.

And you would worry about a cable changing the sound?


;-) Sorry... couldn't resist.


DM
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 6:33:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Fri, 08 Jul 2005 18:21:59 -0500, Wayne <ybstudios@aol.com> wrote:

>Jack wrote:
>> Hi I am holding a microphone about 18" away from my 4x12 speaker
>> cabinet and recording my electric guitar. On the recordings I hear
>> myself picking in the background..any ideas how to avoid having this
>> sound being picked up ? I cant turn it up louder since its already
>> picking up the sound fine, anymore might ruin the recording - should I
>> move the mike to be 6" from the speaker to drown out my picking ?? How
>> do folks get around this ??
>>
>> Thanks!
>>
>> Jack
>>
>Why not just turn around with your back to the mic?

It seems like that would do it. Reading through this thread, I'm
surprised no one has mentioned this, but it's hard to imagine how a
4x12 cabinet running at any "reasonable" volume 18" away from a mic
would not totally drown out the pick sounds of an electric guitar as
little as a couple of feet away.
Perhaps the OP is hearing something else in the recording, maybe
the pick hitting the pickup between/after the strings and causing an
audible click in the signal of the electric guitar, amplified and put
through the cabinet?

>
>Wayne

-----
http://www.mindspring.com/~benbradley
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 10:25:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I'm trying to understand what this is all about. Is it that the
acoustic sound of the guitar is being picked up by the mic that's
placed to pick up the sound from the amplifier? I thought my D-18
was loud. I WANT that guitar!

What, exactly, are we dealing with here?


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 5:58:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:

> I'm trying to understand what this is all about. Is it that the
> acoustic sound of the guitar is being picked up by the mic that's
> placed to pick up the sound from the amplifier? I thought my D-18
> was loud. I WANT that guitar!
>
> What, exactly, are we dealing with here?
>
> --
> I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)

Probably not what the OP is talking about but I had an
odd noise problem with a live show the other day.

Most of my acts are all acoustic and I tend to
have problems with electric bass players. Thus:
An e-bass plugged into the stage DI, no bass amp.
Most of the fundamentals were near or below the
cut-off of the stage monitors. The pick and fret noise
dominated what was heard on stage and sounded
much like a spring reverb being tapped.
I'm thinking about adding some tube distortion
so there are a few more harmonics above
the monitor's cut-off. [ Is there any way to get
an e-bass to sound more "acoustic" ? ]

Later...

Ron Capik
--
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 5:58:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
>
>Most of my acts are all acoustic and I tend to
>have problems with electric bass players. Thus:
>An e-bass plugged into the stage DI, no bass amp.
>Most of the fundamentals were near or below the
>cut-off of the stage monitors. The pick and fret noise
>dominated what was heard on stage and sounded
>much like a spring reverb being tapped.
>I'm thinking about adding some tube distortion
>so there are a few more harmonics above
>the monitor's cut-off. [ Is there any way to get
>an e-bass to sound more "acoustic" ? ]

A bass amp will do wonders in this sort of situation.... the harmonics
from the amp itself are a huge help.

In a pinch, the cheesy ART Tube MP box can actually be a helpful distortion
source for grubbing up a bass feed so it comes across better.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 9:17:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <42CFD7A0.1C690C54@worldnet.att.net> r.capik@worldnet.att.net writes:

> Probably not what the OP is talking about but I had an
> odd noise problem with a live show the other day.
>
> An e-bass plugged into the stage DI, no bass amp.
> Most of the fundamentals were near or below the
> cut-off of the stage monitors. The pick and fret noise
> dominated what was heard on stage and sounded
> much like a spring reverb being tapped.

I suspect it's sound like this that drives bass players (both bass
guitar and acoustic bass with a pickup) to use a small amplifier on
stage. That's the sound they're used to hearing.

I like the theory (back to the original subject) of the pick hitting
the pickup or body, but why he didn't hear that in the amp until he
put a mic in front of it, particularly at a distance of more than a
foot, I'll never know. Maybe he should get down on his knees to
microphone level and listen to what's coming out of the amp.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 11:48:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:

> Ron Capik <r.capik@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
> >
> >Most of my acts are all acoustic and I tend to
> >have problems with electric bass players. Thus:
> >An e-bass plugged into the stage DI, no bass amp.
> >Most of the fundamentals were near or below the
> >cut-off of the stage monitors. The pick and fret noise
> >dominated what was heard on stage and sounded
> >much like a spring reverb being tapped.
> >I'm thinking about adding some tube distortion
> >so there are a few more harmonics above
> >the monitor's cut-off. [ Is there any way to get
> >an e-bass to sound more "acoustic" ? ]
>
> A bass amp will do wonders in this sort of situation.... the harmonics
> from the amp itself are a huge help.
>
> In a pinch, the cheesy ART Tube MP box can actually be a helpful distortion
> source for grubbing up a bass feed so it comes across better.
> --scott

Don't know that I want to buy a house bass amp. Anyway, I picked up
a Behringer "Virtualizer-Pro" FX box to see if it might help. It has lots
of distortion simulations. Now I need to search for the right muck to
add...

Later...

Ron Capik
--
!