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What's the best laptop

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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November 25, 2006 8:55:20 PM

I am personally definitely unable to construct a laptop and have 6,000$ to buy one already made, what laptop would u suggest for the absolute best laptop i can buy on the market, i want top of the line on everything. Just wanting to know what is the best possible laptop i can buy with 6k. ( i'm not gonna build it myself)

More about : laptop

November 26, 2006 12:21:03 AM

why won't anyone fucking respond?
November 26, 2006 5:06:10 PM

A little de-caff might be a good thing today man. LOL

You want the best in what way? graphics, processor, weight, bettery life?

What are you going to use it for?

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November 27, 2006 1:23:00 AM

OH sorry i guess the question wasn't that specific, i want the best gaming laptop for it's primary and almost only use is for gaming. Which factors will be sacrificed for good gaming? I also have another question. Does a duo or dual core processor mean u can't upgrade the graphics card? which is better for a gaming laptop, a turion 64 processor or an intel duo/amd dual core?
November 27, 2006 3:08:07 AM

Let me hit this Q in the morning.
November 27, 2006 4:44:57 AM

I would, in your case, recommend a machine based on Intel's Core Architecture (which does not include Core Duo) with an Nvidia 8xxx series PCIe card. There aren't very many mobile systems that have that, but that's the top of the line you can get these days, especially for $6,000. Also, that price range should get you a WUXGA screen and possibly an HD disc burner depending on what other features you pick.
November 27, 2006 3:42:30 PM

Ok, if you are planning on using it only for gaming, and I am assuming the games you will be playing are graphic intensive, you are going to want to go with something with big-time video card(s). Your budget is really going to factor in here.

What factors will you be sacraficing for a pure gaming rig?
:arrow: Well, heat for one. Big time video cards like GTX class cards or dual video cards are going to throw out a lot of heat.

:arrow: Along with the heat, power consumption is going to be a big factor. You are going to have to sacrafice battery life.

:arrow: Cost.

:arrow: Possibly portability. You aren't going to want to take a 20.1" notebook into class, and depending on where you live, you might not want to take it anywhere w/o armed guards.

Other than that, you aren't going to be sacraficing anything in the way of power or performance. You may have to sacrafice like a floppy drive or maybe an onboard optical or something if you want a RAID set-up, but that also depends on the chassis size you choose.

Your question about the processor effecting the GPU upgradability. No, it won't effect that at all. The one thing is that you are going to want a powerful CPU to handle your higher end games. Something along the lines of a T7400 2.16 Ghz CPU is plenty. Especially when you consider how easy it is to overclock them to 2.66 Ghz, it is your best "bang for the buck".

As far as what processor is best, Turion X2 Dual Core or the Intel Core 2 Duo. Those are both really good processors. It is widely accepted that the C2D is better, but honestly, for gaming, either CPU is going to be able to perform at a comparable level.

People are all up in arms about the 8xxx nVidia cards, well, I don't quite get it because they aren't out for mobile platforms, they aren't scheduled to be released anytime soon as they have to figure out how to actually manufacture them without all the power consumption and heat first. We haven't even gotton to the dual core GPU in notebooks yet, so I think going as far as saying that you should get something that doesn't exist is a little out there.

I hate to break this to everyone, but the 8800 class cards are not the second coming. They're awesome and all, but this isn't alien technology from the future...
Here's some benchmarks against lowly 7900 cards in SLi:




As far as WGXA+, WSXGA+, WUXGA... it really is personal preference. I have a 17" WUXGA notebook, and the only reason it was built was for reviews. I had to have 1920 x 1200 for the reviewers, but in reality, it is difficult to see, it is way too small for a 17" screen, which makes sense seeing as that resolution was designed for 24" monitors! Cut 7" of screen real estate off and it's a squinty experience.

The higher the resolution on the screen, the harder the video card has to work, and the slower the frame rate and less detail you can have on the screen effectively. Do yourself a favor and get SXGA+ resolution and save the chiropractor bills from having to hunch over the monitor to see stuff. Better to use the money on a nice external monitor.

Before we go into the virtues of high end systems, you really have to determine what you want to spend. You can save a lot of time by looking in the right price range to begin with. It's fun to hear all about $15,000 plasma t.v.'s, but since I have $2,000 to spend, I really don't want to fall in love with something that I can't have, and with the exception of bragging rights, probably don't need.

January 10, 2010 7:19:15 PM

Macs are good, But they are fragile.
a b D Laptop
January 10, 2010 7:47:57 PM

*sigh*

Look at the date pls. Thread is 3+ years old. Gailey, stop opening dead threads.
January 10, 2010 7:50:05 PM

I didn't check the date.............. :lol: 
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