Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

inexpensive recording quality compressor recommendations

Last response: in Home Audio
Share
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 10:58:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

hi,

i'm doing some home computer recording with Cubase SX, and a couple of mics.
I want to put a compressor in front of some of the stuff (bass and guitar)
at times, but all I have presently is a stomper. It works, but i'd like
something a little more pro (without breaking the bank).

I'd like to stay in the $ 200.00 range (used is okay). i know that's not
going to get me any gear by Drahmer etc, but it's only for bass and guitars,
pre-disc. I have very good plug in compressors for the mixing stage.

thanks for any suggestions.
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 10:58:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

RNC is a nice one, but you might want to keep your eyes peeled for an
old dbx160x. They might be a tad more than your $200 budget, but you
might get lucky and find one close. Also a few more to look at are MXR
Dual Limiter and maybe even the ART Pro VLA for some things. It's
really more of an effect compressor, but it's fun to have around...and
it's cheap.
later,
m
Related resources
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 2:44:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"joe mama" <dmoss74@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:D w1De.957$Fk4.360@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com
> hi,
>
> i'm doing some home computer recording with Cubase SX, and
a
> couple of mics. I want to put a compressor in front of
some of
> the stuff (bass and guitar) at times, but all I have
presently
> is a stomper. It works, but i'd like something a little
more
> pro (without breaking the bank).
>
> I'd like to stay in the $ 200.00 range (used is okay). i
know
> that's not going to get me any gear by Drahmer etc, but
it's
> only for bass and guitars, pre-disc. I have very good plug
in
> compressors for the mixing stage.

You said that your DAW software has compression. and it
works well, right?
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 5:35:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 7/19/05 2:58 AM, in article dw1De.957$Fk4.360@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com,
"joe mama" <dmoss74@hotmail.com> wrote:

> hi,
>
> i'm doing some home computer recording with Cubase SX, and a couple of mics.
> I want to put a compressor in front of some of the stuff (bass and guitar)
> at times, but all I have presently is a stomper. It works, but i'd like
> something a little more pro (without breaking the bank).
>
> I'd like to stay in the $ 200.00 range (used is okay). i know that's not
> going to get me any gear by Drahmer etc, but it's only for bass and guitars,
> pre-disc. I have very good plug in compressors for the mixing stage.

These plug-ins, do they know how to undo artifacts from a
less-than-wonderful tracking compressor?
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 5:35:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

SSJVCmag <ten@nozirev.gamnocssj.com> wrote:
>On 7/19/05 2:58 AM, in article dw1De.957$Fk4.360@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com,
>"joe mama" <dmoss74@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> i'm doing some home computer recording with Cubase SX, and a couple of mics.
>> I want to put a compressor in front of some of the stuff (bass and guitar)
>> at times, but all I have presently is a stomper. It works, but i'd like
>> something a little more pro (without breaking the bank).
>>
>> I'd like to stay in the $ 200.00 range (used is okay). i know that's not
>> going to get me any gear by Drahmer etc, but it's only for bass and guitars,
>> pre-disc. I have very good plug in compressors for the mixing stage.
>
>These plug-ins, do they know how to undo artifacts from a
>less-than-wonderful tracking compressor?

If you want a compressor to bring average levels up transparently, the
RNC is a great idea.

If you want a compressor as an effect, you will probably need to budget
more money. Although I will say the cheap ART "fake tube" compressor
isn't bad as a guitar or bass effect, though it is kind of heavy-handed.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 5:54:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

exactly - use the plugs.

"SSJVCmag" <ten@nozirev.gamnocssj.com> wrote in message
news:BF0279D8.C911%ten@nozirev.gamnocssj.com...
> On 7/19/05 2:58 AM, in article
> dw1De.957$Fk4.360@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com,
> "joe mama" <dmoss74@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>> hi,
>>
>> i'm doing some home computer recording with Cubase SX, and a couple of
>> mics.
>> I want to put a compressor in front of some of the stuff (bass and
>> guitar)
>> at times, but all I have presently is a stomper. It works, but i'd like
>> something a little more pro (without breaking the bank).
>>
>> I'd like to stay in the $ 200.00 range (used is okay). i know that's not
>> going to get me any gear by Drahmer etc, but it's only for bass and
>> guitars,
>> pre-disc. I have very good plug in compressors for the mixing stage.
>
> These plug-ins, do they know how to undo artifacts from a
> less-than-wonderful tracking compressor?
>
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 8:05:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:FYednX_09J0hjEDfRVn-2Q@comcast.com...
>
> You said that your DAW software has compression. and it
> works well, right?

Yes, but it only works post-tracking. I want to get something in front of
the signal, and even it out before it gets to the disc. Just some smoothing
out is all I am looking for.

The dbx 160x might be the best choice for what I'm looking for (according to
other posts I've read).

Thanks for the info....
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 8:05:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

joe mama <dmoss74@hotmail.com> wrote:
>"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
>>
>> You said that your DAW software has compression. and it
>> works well, right?
>
>Yes, but it only works post-tracking. I want to get something in front of
>the signal, and even it out before it gets to the disc. Just some smoothing
>out is all I am looking for.

Why does that matter? The wonderful thing about the digital world is that
the recording process itself is relatively transparent, so whatever processing
you did in tracking can now be moved to post. Either way the results are
aboout the same.

There is no push to compress in tracking in an attempt to deal with limited
dynamic range, like there is in the analogue world. With a good digital
system, you have all the range you could ever use, and then some.

If you track with effects, you can't undo them.

>The dbx 160x might be the best choice for what I'm looking for (according to
>other posts I've read).

It's a useful box, but it's not subtle, so you need to make sure that really
_is_ what you're looking for, each time you cut a track.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 8:05:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"joe mama" <dmoss74@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:sx9De.4761$_%4.580@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com
> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> news:FYednX_09J0hjEDfRVn-2Q@comcast.com...
>>
>> You said that your DAW software has compression. and it
>> works well, right?
>
> Yes, but it only works post-tracking.

Well, yes....

> I want to get something
> in front of the signal, and even it out before it gets to
the
> disc.

The reason being?

> Just some smoothing out is all I am looking for.

It seems to me that the sole unique benefit of compression
pre-tracking would be that someone would be spared the
indignity of hearing that someone's playing is very uneven.
IOW, you want compression in the monitors.

Compressing the monitors (as opposed to limiting the
monitors which id different) violates the idea of
monitoring. One major purpose of monitoring is providing the
muso audible guidance that will help him play consistently
with his artistic goals.

That's one reason why stage monitors are generally
pre-fader. The monitors are supposed to be consistent.

Putting a compressor in covers up some of the muso's
inconsistencies, right? So now the muso is getting a
happy-time lie about how he's playing. It's like painting
while wearing pink-tinted glasses.

There's a problem with artificially leveling an inconsistent
player. Just leveling the amplitude doesn't eliminate all
the effects of inconsistent playing. The compressor adds its
own artifacts, and then you have the artifacts of
inconsistent playing that are sepearate from simple sound
level. These artifacts definately exist because whether
you're playing or singing there are changes to timbre and
other qualities when you are playing and/or singing
inconsistently.
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 10:00:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <sx9De.4761$_%4.580@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com> dmoss74@hotmail.com writes:

> > You said that your DAW software has compression. and it
> > works well, right?
>
> Yes, but it only works post-tracking. I want to get something in front of
> the signal, and even it out before it gets to the disc. Just some smoothing
> out is all I am looking for.

Why bother? The whole concept of using a DAW is that you can have a
second, or third, or twenty-eighth chance to get it right. Set the
record level so that you don't clip (don't rely on a compressor to
do this for you) and just record. Then decide what it needs and do it.

There's nothing wrong with compressing when you record if you know you
need it and you have the right settings. But unless you're very
experienced, you're less likely to have to fix something you can't
easily fix if you leave your processing until after it's recorded.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 19, 2005 10:00:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <DuqdnWLqLYjk0EDfRVn-tw@comcast.com> arnyk@hotpop.com writes:

> It seems to me that the sole unique benefit of compression
> pre-tracking would be that someone would be spared the
> indignity of hearing that someone's playing is very uneven.

Well, maybe. Actually, when working with a medium with limited dynamic
range (like analog tape) it was worth doing a little compression when
recording and pushing the level a bit higher for better signal to
noise ratio. But with more than 40 dB more dynamic range to work with
than with analong tape, you don't need to work so close to the limit.
It's better to make a mistake in setting up a compressor when you can
undo the results than when it's recorded and the vocalist has gone on
tour.

If the singer's really bad, it would probably be best to show him what
he's doing and help him correct it rather than try to hide it. I'll
come back to haunt you.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 9:32:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Okay then, I need more generic engineering info. I am just a guitarist who
bought Cubase for some home stuff. Now I have people wanting to record, and
othe than transport functions, and a little trial and error (soundwise), I
am no engineer. I had a bass player that was all over the map, db wise, and
wanted to smooth him out. Yes it's a mask, but I believe it's been used
since the dawn of recorded music.

Can any of you pros recommend a "great" beginner's guide to record
engineering? Without being TOO technical. Again, I am a user, not a techie.
I don't need to learn the whole "acoustics" thing. I know what sounds good.
I just want to be able to record it ;=)

My setup is modest for now, but I'd like to eventually expand. I wantto stay
in the computer realm, since I know computers better than giant tape
machines and boards.

thanks for the help....
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 10:49:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"joe mama" <dmoss74@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:SllDe.1180$Fk4.985@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
>
> Can any of you pros recommend a "great" beginner's guide to record
> engineering? Without being TOO technical. Again, I am a user, not a
> techie. I don't need to learn the whole "acoustics" thing. I know what
> sounds good. I just want to be able to record it ;=)

http://www.theprojectstudiohandbook.com/directory.htm
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 12:17:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"joe mama" <dmoss74@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:SllDe.1180$Fk4.985@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com

> I had a bass player that was all over the map, db wise,
and
> wanted to smooth him out. Yes it's a mask, but I believe
it's
> been used since the dawn of recorded music.

This kind of surprises me because IME bass players tend to
be fairly consistent.

The question is not about the advisability of making the
bass notes consistent, but how to get them consistent the
best way.

I'm wondering if there were acoustical resonances that were
affecting the amplitudes of various notes.

From the standpoint of the finished product, I don't see how
it matters whether you even the notes out before or after
tracking. The advantages of doing after tracking include:

(1) You can vary compressor parameters in the DAW software
and undo and redo until you get exactly what you want with
only one tracking session.

(2) You might be able to use your DAW software
diagnostically to determine the nature and source of the
problem if its not the player.

(3) If the problem is room resonances, it may turn out that
equalization is the better way to correct the problem.
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 2:53:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

joe mama wrote:
> Can any of you pros recommend a "great" beginner's guide to record
> engineering? Without being TOO technical. Again, I am a user, not a techie.
> I don't need to learn the whole "acoustics" thing. I know what sounds good.
> I just want to be able to record it ;=)

The Mixing Engineer's Handbook by Bobby Owsinski
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/087288723...
July 20, 2005 4:49:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 19 Jul 2005 06:58:17 +0000, joe mama wrote:

> hi,
>
> i'm doing some home computer recording with Cubase SX, and a couple of mics.
> I want to put a compressor in front of some of the stuff (bass and guitar)
> at times, but all I have presently is a stomper. It works, but i'd like
> something a little more pro (without breaking the bank).

I have the Behringer Composer which is a very nice compressor at a bargain
price. From my experience it's fairly close to a Drawmer. Try and get the
valve version of the Composer as it's not much more expensive but it
sounds sweet!

--
Jafar Calley
Producer - http://moonlife-records.com
--------------------------------------
See the latest Mars and Saturn images
http://fatcat.homelinux.org
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 4:51:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <SllDe.1180$Fk4.985@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com> dmoss74@hotmail.com writes:

> Can any of you pros recommend a "great" beginner's guide to record
> engineering? Without being TOO technical.

There is no book that's a substitute for experience. Practice!

I haven't kept up with the latest publications, but one that I'm sure
is out of print now (published in 1990) but you can probably find used
is "Sound Advice - The Musician's Guide to the Recording Studio" by
Wayne Wadhams. ISBN 0-02-872674-4, Library of Congress catalog number
89-34022. There's an optional companion CD - look for a copy that has
the CD if you search the coves. It's old school, practically nothing
about recording with a DAW (there were practically no DAWs then) but
the fundamentals never change.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 8:25:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"jafar" <nooo@nospam.com> wrote in message ...

> I have the Behringer Composer which is a very nice compressor at a bargain
> price. From my experience it's fairly close to a Drawmer. Try and get the
> valve version of the Composer as it's not much more expensive but it
> sounds sweet!


Any comments on this?
Anonymous
July 20, 2005 9:28:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Predrag Trpkov wrote:
> The matter of taste, for the most part. However, mentioning Drawmer in this
> context is bad taste.
>
> Predrag

Well, they do both have knobs... maybe that's what he meant?

Steve
Anonymous
July 21, 2005 12:15:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

thanks for all of the written materials to look for. i am sure that when all
is said and done, signal path is really what i need to learn. i do have
great ears--if i don't say so myself ;=) so i need to learn some nuts and
bolts.

thanks again....
Anonymous
July 21, 2005 6:23:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"David Morgan (MAMS)" <mams@NOSPAm-a-m-s.com> wrote in message
news:GVuDe.22905$IJ1.4653@trnddc02...
>
> "jafar" <nooo@nospam.com> wrote in message ...
>
> > I have the Behringer Composer which is a very nice compressor at a
bargain
> > price. From my experience it's fairly close to a Drawmer. Try and get
the
> > valve version of the Composer as it's not much more expensive but it
> > sounds sweet!
>
>
> Any comments on this?


The matter of taste, for the most part. However, mentioning Drawmer in this
context is bad taste.

Predrag
Anonymous
July 21, 2005 10:20:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi,
Try this: route the output of the track you are recording on to an aux
input track and put a compressor on that. That way you have monitoring
compression and a clean signal going to "tape". A bit of compression
seems to help alot of musicians when they are tracking.
Regards,
Dave
!