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miking 2 drum kits with only 5 channels...

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Anonymous
July 21, 2005 3:45:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hey y'all, I'd like to get some input from some of you thinkin'
fellers in regards to miking multiple drum kits simultaneously for
recording purposes. We've got a great-sounding room, a bunch of
baffles/gobos, a fairly good selection of mics, but only an 8 track
machine. I don't want to overdub any more than just the vocal track.
I'd rather keep it simple by relying on good mic placement than
overdubbing & bouncing just for the sake of having a mic on every
little thing.

I should also explain that one of the kits only qualifies for the
term "kit" because it's played with drumsticks. Kit #2 (from here on
referred to as "the cube") is actually a collection of random drums,
hi-hats, peices of metal, an industrial oil drum, and other assorted
items.

OK, still with me? Here we go:

1 channel for vocals, 1 for guitar, 1 for bass, that leaves 5 total to
split between the two "kits".

Here's the gameplan:

Variation #1: Each kit placed diagonally across from each
other(corners 1 & 4 for example), guitar and bass in either remaining
corner, baffles between guitar/bass and percussion to reduce direct
bleed. One mic (omni or boundary) dead center as a room mic for
controlable bleed/ reverb/ ambience etc. Two mics each about 3-6 feet
for the "kits".

Variation #2: Both kits placed consecutively (1 & 2). Center room
mic as from V#1 above. One center mic per kit (3-6 feet from kick
drums) and one side/ OH on opposite sides. The idea here is to treat
the kits as a section. The goal is that you could then pan each mic
away from the center mic with little or no phase problems and this huge
stereo image, much like the way the band actually sounds live (as
opposed to the first version, where it could end up sounding as if the
drummers are somehow occupying the same location- impossible but for
the awesomeness of technology!).


helpful ascii diagram:

------------
|1 2|
| |
| |
| |
|3 4|
------------

I hope to see some interesting input on this one. I'd be willing to
bet it comes up far less often than the "what compressor/mic/sandwich
should i get" posts.

As always, thanks for the bandwidth,
-daver
Anonymous
July 21, 2005 3:51:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

an additional note: the room itself is roughly 75 square feet, so
there's plenty of room to spread things out to reduce/ control bleed.

-daver
Anonymous
July 22, 2005 4:41:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

mainmachine wrote:
> Hey y'all, I'd like to get some input from some of you thinkin'
> fellers in regards to miking multiple drum kits simultaneously for
> recording purposes. We've got a great-sounding room, a bunch of
> baffles/gobos, a fairly good selection of mics, but only an 8 track
> machine. I don't want to overdub any more than just the vocal track.
> I'd rather keep it simple by relying on good mic placement than
> overdubbing & bouncing just for the sake of having a mic on every
> little thing.
>
> I should also explain that one of the kits only qualifies for the
> term "kit" because it's played with drumsticks. Kit #2 (from here on
> referred to as "the cube") is actually a collection of random drums,
> hi-hats, peices of metal, an industrial oil drum, and other assorted
> items.
>
> OK, still with me? Here we go:
>
> 1 channel for vocals, 1 for guitar, 1 for bass, that leaves 5 total to
> split between the two "kits".
>
> Here's the gameplan:
>
> Variation #1: Each kit placed diagonally across from each
> other(corners 1 & 4 for example), guitar and bass in either remaining
> corner, baffles between guitar/bass and percussion to reduce direct
> bleed. One mic (omni or boundary) dead center as a room mic for
> controlable bleed/ reverb/ ambience etc. Two mics each about 3-6 feet
> for the "kits".
>
> Variation #2: Both kits placed consecutively (1 & 2). Center room
> mic as from V#1 above. One center mic per kit (3-6 feet from kick
> drums) and one side/ OH on opposite sides. The idea here is to treat
> the kits as a section. The goal is that you could then pan each mic
> away from the center mic with little or no phase problems and this huge
> stereo image, much like the way the band actually sounds live (as
> opposed to the first version, where it could end up sounding as if the
> drummers are somehow occupying the same location- impossible but for
> the awesomeness of technology!).
>
>
> helpful ascii diagram:
>
> ------------
> |1 2|
> | |
> | |
> | |
> |3 4|
> ------------
>
> I hope to see some interesting input on this one. I'd be willing to
> bet it comes up far less often than the "what compressor/mic/sandwich
> should i get" posts.
>
> As always, thanks for the bandwidth,
> -daver
Looks to me like you already have your plan.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 2:51:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

A mic on each kick. A mic on each snare. Two room/overheads as a stero
pair to pick up both kits and on mono room mic with some compression.
Anonymous
August 4, 2005 3:05:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

sorry, but you've exceeded your alotted number of channels!

LOL!

BTW (acronyms f'ing blow) i actually went with the second approach,
treating the two kits as one giant stereo image, and so far it's
sounding fantastic! we haven't even really sat down to mix it yet, and
the band is really psyched on just the rough-mixed version.

if there had been two john bonhams and they both played drums in
zepplin simultaneously, and andy johns had recorded them, it would have
sounded like this (well, kind of!).

-daver
!