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Concern Re Tannoy Reveals...

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Anonymous
July 22, 2005 4:28:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It seems like when I first got them a few months back that they made
zero sound until I played my synth thru them.

Now, they appear to have a low "noise" when they're on. A sort of very
low static hum. You don't really notice it until you listen for it.

I have them placed on each side of a small stereo set of speakers. I
didn't think that would matter, but I unplugged the stereo.
....Attempted a different outlet. ...Turned my synth off.

None of these made any difference. I still hear the low sound.

Has it always been there?

I just wanted to make sure. They're great monitors, I just thought
they were completely silent when on and not being used.

Thanks.

More about : concern tannoy reveals

Anonymous
July 22, 2005 5:24:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

these are really good monitors, i have used them before. might be your
power. try a power conditioner.
Anonymous
July 22, 2005 5:37:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks...any suggestions? Shall I just do a search on "power
conditioner?"

This is new to me.

Any further opinions on this are welcome. I love these monitors too,
and hate to think that something could be wrong. I'm very gentle with
them as well.
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Anonymous
July 22, 2005 6:06:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

if it sounds like a ground hum, trace your signal path - follow all
your cables and make sure they arent laying on top of, or crossing
power cords. if your line or mic level cables are in too close
proximity to power cords, they can pick up an induced 60hz hum.
July 22, 2005 8:17:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I moved into a new premises and noticed that my Event TR6's are also
emitting a very low hum. Im sure it's the power, Im in an old building
now, and the wires are a mess, dont have good earthing either. Also,
did it rain recently ?

Sidhu
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 2:34:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I plugged their power cords into 3-to-2 prong adapters. And old trick
to sometimes minimize hum, if that's the problem you're having. But,
the Reveal Actives do have some residual "hiss" and a little buzz
anyway, if you get close and listen. A common problem with active
speakers.

Steve
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 6:36:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Steve Scott" <squeegybug@netspace1.com> wrote in message
news:1122096851.458247.211120@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> I plugged their power cords into 3-to-2 prong adapters. And old trick
> to sometimes minimize hum, if that's the problem you're having. But,
> the Reveal Actives do have some residual "hiss" and a little buzz
> anyway, if you get close and listen. A common problem with active
> speakers.

My Events' have the same combo XLR-1/4 inch inputs, and I find that the 1/4
inch inputs just don't make good contact so I always get some hum when using
TRS cords. With standard mic cables they are absolutely clean.

Sean
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 1:01:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It's on GFCI. Sorry for the speling eror, didn't mean to upset you.
Steve
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 1:04:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It's on GFCI. Sory for the speling eror.
Steve
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 2:12:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Steve Scott <squeegybug@netspace1.com> wrote:
>I plugged their power cords into 3-to-2 prong adapters. And old trick
>to sometimes minimize hum, if that's the problem you're having.

No, this is a trick to break ground loops. Aside from the fact that it
is hazardous and invalidates all your insurance, it works by interrupting
the circuit formed between parallel grounds.

Idiots that break power line grounds and get themselves injured do not
get any sympathy from me.

A better solution than breaking the power line ground is to interrupt
the signal ground with a ground lift adaptor. This is less apt to result
in the smell of burned flesh.

>But,
>the Reveal Actives do have some residual "hiss" and a little buzz
>anyway, if you get close and listen. A common problem with active
>speakers.

The original poster still has yet to reply whether the noise continues
with the inputs disconnected. If the noise is still there with no input,
it's not a ground loop.

But then, the original poster never said if he had the active or passive
Reveals.
--scott
>
>Steve
>


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 5:21:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Steve Scott <squeegybug@netspace1.com> wrote:
>It's on GFCI. Sorry for the speling eror, didn't mean to upset you.

GFCIs will protect you from injury, but they can also be noise sources
in themselves.

In addition, of course, if you have enough of a ground fault to cause
hum with the ground connected, it might be enough to pop the GFCI as
well.

Just fix your grounding. A consistent and reliable grounding system
is always a good idea.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 8:19:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Steve Scott wrote:
> I plugged their power cords into 3-to-2 prong adapters. And old trick
> to sometimes minimize hum

Amazing how the illiterate are often the ones who perform dangerous
practices.

Lifting the /safety/ ground is one of the most stupid things you can do
outside of a workshop environment without RCD protection. People still die
from doing this - suggesting it as a way to cure hum is crazy.


--
"it's very dangerous to fall asleep in the bath, I keep myself awake by
constantly making toast"
!