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32-bit Vista will only upgrade to 32-bit Win7....?

Last response: in Windows 7
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June 26, 2009 7:55:23 AM

I pre-ordered the $49.99 Windows 7 Home Premium upgrade on Amazon. My intention was to upgrade my current 32-bit Vista to the 64-bit Windows 7.

But now I'm worried that Microsoft may not consider that to be a valid upgrade path. I'm worried that the upgrade software will only let me install the 32-bit version of Windows 7, since the OS it will replace on my PC is only 32-bit.

Does anybody know with reasonable certainty that won't be the case?

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a b $ Windows 7
June 26, 2009 11:22:49 AM

You cannot install 64bit over 32. there are too many different components. Clean install or 32 bit.
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a b $ Windows 7
June 26, 2009 12:31:10 PM

There is no upgrade path from 32 bit to 64 bit. You should simply buy x64 up front.
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June 27, 2009 9:42:01 PM

People have mentioned that the upgrade will contain both 32 and 64-bit versions, so you can upgrade to either version. But you may need to do a clean install of the 64-bit version as opposed to an in-place upgrade (or installing over your current OS), which would have kept your files and apps automatically. I think people confuse the meaning of the term "upgrade". I think most people use it loosely to describe the act of going from one older OS to a more recent OS. "Vista sucks, I'm read to upgrade to Windows 7." They may upgrade or do a clean install but either way, Vista is going out the curb. Microsoft defines upgrade paths as either clean install or in-place. In-place installs the latest OS in-place with minimal impact to your existing system, i.e., files and applications all remain in tact. Clean install removes everything. Both methods are still upgrading though.

So when someone mentions that you can't upgrade XP to W7 or you can't upgrade from 32 to 64-bit bit, all they mean (I think) is that you can't do it it without backing up your files yourself and reinstalling your apps. It needs to be clean install. I think most people recommend doing a clean install anyway. Unless you've got a ton of apps and don't have the original CDs. But it shouldn't take much to get the PC back the way you had it. And you'll probably realize you don't use half the apps you had installed anyway!
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a b $ Windows 7
June 29, 2009 12:35:33 PM

Quote:
So when someone mentions that you can't upgrade XP to W7 or you can't upgrade from 32 to 64-bit bit, all they mean (I think) is that you can't do it it without backing up your files yourself and reinstalling your apps. It needs to be clean install.


Exactly Correct
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June 29, 2009 8:23:59 PM

1. Windows Home, Pro, Enterprise and Ultimate editions all have BOTH 32-bit and 64-bit installations bundled with them. They do not sell 32-bit or 64-bit only boxes. Every box comes with both 32-bit and 64-it versions. You pick and choose which version of the OS you want to install during the initial setup. (Of course, you need a 64-bit CPU too for the 64-bit OS install, but this is pretty much standard now)

NOTE: If you are running 32-bit Vista and want to upgrade to 64-bit Win7, you will have to choose to do a clean install during the installation setup, which will wipe your hard drive. There is no direct Vista 32-bit to Win7 64-bit installation without doing a hard drive wipe.


2. All you need to use for the Win 7 upgrade versions is the original Vista or XP installation CDs (these can either be Full or Upgrade versions too) and the Key Code. During the Win7 Upgrade install on a blank HDD, it'll simply ask you to pop in the CD and punch in the key code just to verify you own it. You will not have to do a full install of XP or Vista prior to installing Win7. All you need is the discs and the key code.

3. No matter which version of Windows 7 you get, (Home, Pro, etc...) you can go online to Microsoft's website and pay for an "anytime upgrade" to unlock the Pro, Enterprise and Ultimate Edition features at a later time. So if you get the Home edition and you find out later you need the Ultimate edition for something (like the Windows XP mode) then you can just pay for the unlock code to get the feature. The discs all have the FULL version of the OS on them - the only difference is that certain editions, liek the Home edition, have features locked.
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a b $ Windows 7
June 30, 2009 12:22:38 PM

Separate computer, separate licence.
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a b $ Windows 7
June 30, 2009 3:12:10 PM

If you have Vista on computer A, you may NOT use an upgrade licence on computer B.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 1, 2009 2:06:23 AM

Quote:
Yeah thats the theory, but what I'm saying is, I already have vista on my computer.
What if I install the Win7 on my new pc and use the vista disk just to verify I have it during the install. Will it know I'm keeping vista on my other computer?

Because Vista doesn't work like that, and I am going to assume that neither will 7. Vista will not ask you to insert a disk to verify, it is going to look for a full installation. If it does not find one, the install will halt, and will tell you that you must have an upgradeable OS installed to continue.
If you have an upgrade version of Vista, you must have an upgradeable OS INSTALLED.
Now, one may be able to install XP to the new system, not activate it, and do the Vista upgrade (or 7), and activate Vista, I have not tried that route, but I would think as much trouble as Microsoft has gone to, to make sure you are doing things the legal and correct way with Vista, I am not so sure that would even work. But as I said, I have not tried.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 1, 2009 3:39:41 PM

You're quoting Netherscourge.

Kindly don't mis~attribute me in your efforts to find real or imagined loopholes in Microsoft's licencing so you can justify using an upgrade for a complete install.
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July 1, 2009 5:59:23 PM

upgrades are retarded, always do a fresh install to a new OS. Also buying the upgrade CD is also completely retarded. Why pay for a CD like this? You will have to install Vista then upgrade to 7 every time you reformat. Ridiculous.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 1, 2009 11:33:42 PM

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Ok now your contradicting what Scotteq just told us. He says you dont need vista installed to use the upgrade, just the vista disk and keycode for verification.

Quote:
2. All you need to use for the Win 7 upgrade versions is the original Vista or XP installation CDs (these can either be Full or Upgrade versions too) and the Key Code. During the Win7 Upgrade install on a blank HDD, it'll simply ask you to pop in the CD and punch in the key code just to verify you own it. You will not have to do a full install of XP or Vista prior to installing Win7. All you need is the discs and the key code.
Quoted from Scotteq


7 may be indeed be different, that is the way XP, and previous versions of Windows worked, simply pop in a previous disk and verify, and away you go with a clean install on a clean drive.
All I can tell you is Vista won't work that way. I would assume 7 wouldn't either, but as I said, I could be wrong.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 1, 2009 11:53:41 PM

As I've stated before - uSoft hade a loop hole (intended, or Not) so that you could install the OEM upgrade WITHOUT having the previous version on your HDD. While this is illegal to circument "owning" the previous edition, it would be legal if you infact own the previous edition. THE questioned was this a goof and did the fix it. probably did.

To kamaric - I guess I'm retarted to save the cost differential between a half priced oem upgrade DVD as opposed to FULL price for a "Box" full version. I'll stay retarted and use my money elsewhere.
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July 9, 2009 10:31:14 PM

If you're overly worried, order the Vista 64 bit alternative media. It costs you postage and packaging. Install it. Upgrade to Win 7 64 bit. And yes, do a clean install - which you CAN do with an upgrade version.
Its like warm apple pie...
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July 10, 2009 10:56:20 PM

knotknut said:
Windows 7 Pre-Order Offer : Frequently asked questions

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/buy/offers/pre-order-f...

Not alot of help but some.

Here is some info from MSDN Blogs.
Read: "Delivering a quality upgrade experience", almost to the bottom of page 1.
Also note where it says,"These same steps will be required as we transition from the RC milestone to the RTM milestone."

http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/




Actually the first link answers this question completely. You just have to read the appropriate questions. YES, you can do a clean install with the upgrade DVDs.
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July 14, 2009 8:28:32 AM

Okay folks According to "hoyle" AKA Microsoft
To upgrade to windows from 32 bit to 64

"If you want to move from a 32-bit version of Windows to a 64-bit version of Windows, you'll need to back up your files and then perform a custom installation of the 64-bit version of Windows"


To use the upgrade disk on a blank drive or to do a clean install

"Upgrading to Windows 7. Choose Upgrade to keep your files, settings, and programs from your current version of Windows, and if your current version of Windows can be upgraded. If your version of Windows can't be upgraded, you need to choose Custom.

Installing a custom version of Windows. Choose Custom to completely replace your current operating system, or to install Windows on a specific drive or partition that you select. You can also use Custom if your computer does not have an operating system, or if you want to set up a multiboot system on your computer. For more information about setting up a multiboot system, see Install more than one operating system (multiboot)."


So basically if you are going from Vista 32 to 7 32 or Vista 64 to 7 64 you can use the upgrade option.
For XP and all others you need to do a custom install.

Kgrach
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