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Schoeps Suggestions

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Anonymous
July 22, 2005 11:17:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I'm wanting to start recording classical music. Chamber ensembles
mostly. I have a Terratec Phase 24 sound card and good computer.
I'm thinking of buying a pair of Schoeps, mostly because of their
great reputation and because of the fact, unless I've understood it
wrong, that they include preamps in the actual microphone, thus making
them much cheaper in effect than say, a pair of neuman 184s and a good
stereo preamp. I am not sure what locales I will be recording in, my
guess is everything from living rooms to the outdoors to quality
performance halls. I need some advice on what kind of Schoeps I should
get and whether or not it is true that they have preamps already
included that put out enough power to go direct into a soundcard.

More about : schoeps suggestions

Anonymous
July 23, 2005 12:35:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Please don't be confused by the crazy terminology which we use in this
business--every condenser microphone has a capsule and an amplifier,
but the signal from that amplifier gets fed into a circuit which we
persist in calling a "preamplifier". I guess that's because when you
use an outboard preamplifer in a studio, you feed the preamplifier's
output to a line-level input of the console, so it really is "pre" the
console. But it's "post" the amplifier that's a part of the microphone.

If you expect to record a wide range of different performances in a
range of settings, you might want to consider a pair of the Schoeps CMC
65. These have switchable two-pattern (cardioid / omnidirectional)
capsules, so you'd be equipped for both of the techniques that people
mostly use for two-mike stereo recording (= coincident and spaced) as
well as for a reasonable range of spaces and applications.

But you will need some sort of outboard mike preamp. The least
expensive good one that I know of, and that I've tested with Schoeps
microphones specifically, is the M Audio DMP-3. You'll most likely need
to operate it in its lower-gain setting; there's a pushbutton on the
front panel for that. The FMR Audio "Real Nice Preamp" costs somewhat
more but is smaller and perhaps less fragile, and will definitely give
you better bragging rights around here, but the DMP-3 is definitely
good enough to start with.

--best regards
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 2:33:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Schoeps Suggestions

Group: rec.audio.pro Date: Fri, Jul 22, 2005, 7:17pm (EDT-3) From:
inkexit@yahoo.com

I'm wanting to start recording classical music. Chamber ensembles
mostly. I have a Terratec Phase 24 sound card and good computer. I'm
thinking of buying a pair of Schoeps, mostly because of their great
reputation and because of the fact, unless I've understood it wrong,
that they include preamps in the actual microphone, thus making them
much cheaper in effect than say, a pair of neuman 184s and a good stereo
preamp.<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

You understood wrong. Both the Schoeps & Neumann require preamps. In
fact all microphones require pre amps.


Eric
Related resources
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 2:07:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<inkexit@yahoo.com> wrote:
>I'm wanting to start recording classical music. Chamber ensembles
>mostly. I have a Terratec Phase 24 sound card and good computer.
>I'm thinking of buying a pair of Schoeps, mostly because of their
>great reputation and because of the fact, unless I've understood it
>wrong, that they include preamps in the actual microphone, thus making
>them much cheaper in effect than say, a pair of neuman 184s and a good
>stereo preamp. I am not sure what locales I will be recording in, my
>guess is everything from living rooms to the outdoors to quality
>performance halls. I need some advice on what kind of Schoeps I should
>get and whether or not it is true that they have preamps already
>included that put out enough power to go direct into a soundcard.
>


No, the "preamp" in the Schoeps is like the B&K "follower." It brings
the signal from the capsule up to microphone level. You still need a
microphone preamp.

You may want to invest in something better than a cheesy soundcard for
converters as well, if you're going to bother using good microphones.

The particular model mike you want depends mostly on the pattern you
want which mostly depends on the microphone technique you want. There
is a good elementary tutorial on stereophony on www.josephson.com.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 2:08:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Eric Toline <Audioetc@webtv.net> wrote:
>
>
>You understood wrong. Both the Schoeps & Neumann require preamps. In
>fact all microphones require pre amps.

Not an RE-20 in a kick drum!
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 5:07:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:

>
>
> No, the "preamp" in the Schoeps is like the B&K "follower." It brings
> the signal from the capsule up to microphone level. You still need a
> microphone preamp.

So then why would you not want to get the version that is just the
capsule? The collette or whatever it is? If I have to get a preamp,
I'm thinking somewhere in the $1500 range, something warm, not too high
frequency focused.

>
> You may want to invest in something better than a cheesy soundcard for
> converters as well, if you're going to bother using good microphones.

Ouch! Not cheesy. Very nice external 24 bit card. You must be
thinking of that 16 bit soundblaster I recorded the last thing I sent
you on, 'Attacca.'


> The particular model mike you want depends mostly on the pattern you
> want which mostly depends on the microphone technique you want. There
> is a good elementary tutorial on stereophony on www.josephson.com.

What technique would you reccommend? You're the expert. ;-)

> --scott
> --
> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 10:27:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<inkexit@yahoo.com> wrote:
>Scott Dorsey wrote:
>>
>> No, the "preamp" in the Schoeps is like the B&K "follower." It brings
>> the signal from the capsule up to microphone level. You still need a
>> microphone preamp.
>
>So then why would you not want to get the version that is just the
>capsule? The collette or whatever it is? If I have to get a preamp,
>I'm thinking somewhere in the $1500 range, something warm, not too high
>frequency focused.

I'm not sure what you're talking about, because the Collette is a whole
series of mikes.

Mikes with interchangeable capsules are a good idea, though, because you
can buy one preamp module and a bunch of capsules for different patterns
and responses.

>> You may want to invest in something better than a cheesy soundcard for
>> converters as well, if you're going to bother using good microphones.
>
>Ouch! Not cheesy. Very nice external 24 bit card. You must be
>thinking of that 16 bit soundblaster I recorded the last thing I sent
>you on, 'Attacca.'

Compare it with a Prism or the higher grade Lavry stuff and you will
be shocked. If you're spending $3k for a pair of mikes, you're probably
also looking to spend something in the $3k to $5k range for a 2-channel
converter to match.

>> The particular model mike you want depends mostly on the pattern you
>> want which mostly depends on the microphone technique you want. There
>> is a good elementary tutorial on stereophony on www.josephson.com.
>
>What technique would you reccommend? You're the expert. ;-)

Depends entirely on the room. Personally I am a big fan of the Jecklin
disc with most chamber works in good-sounding rooms. For larger ensembles
the Jecklin can work too, but sometimes pulling back with an ORTF pair
is a good idea because it can be hard to get the room ambience down at
times with a Jecklin pair.

One of the local halls here is very long and narrow, and I do a lot of
choral stuff there. The narrow angle of acceptance of a Blumlein pair
is a huge advantage there.

That's why I carry a bunch of capsules around, for different rooms and
applications.

I personally suggest learning to place ORTF mikes first before doing
anything else, since it's probably a good first step and certainly easier
to do than most other techniques.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 12:41:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:
> <inkexit@yahoo.com> wrote:

> >So then why would you not want to get the version that is just the
> >capsule? The collette or whatever it is? If I have to get a preamp,
> >I'm thinking somewhere in the $1500 range, something warm, not too high
> >frequency focused.
>
> I'm not sure what you're talking about, because the Collette is a whole
> series of mikes.

OKay, not collette, the 'compact' series, the small ones with no
microphone preamp. Here is a good link:

http://www.schoeps.de/E-2004/cmc.html

This page is about what I thought were the preamps, they even talk
about phantom powering and all that. The small mics that I was
refering to are on the left side of the page attached to stands.


> >Ouch! Not cheesy. Very nice external 24 bit card. You must be
> >thinking of that 16 bit soundblaster I recorded the last thing I sent
> >you on, 'Attacca.'
>
> Compare it with a Prism or the higher grade Lavry stuff and you will
> be shocked. If you're spending $3k for a pair of mikes, you're probably
> also looking to spend something in the $3k to $5k range for a 2-channel
> converter to match.

Oh, I'm sure, but I'm still pretty blown away with what my little phase
24 can do at the moment. And oh, I make 7.90 an hour, 3k for mics, 3k
for a pre, and 3k for a convertor just aint happenin. And shoot, I
didn't even know the Schoeps sold for that much, the last time I priced
them they were about $1500 for a pair (and that was pushin it).
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 12:34:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 16:07:30 -0400, inkexit@yahoo.com wrote
(in article <1122149249.913341.254060@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>):

> Scott Dorsey wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> No, the "preamp" in the Schoeps is like the B&K "follower." It brings
>> the signal from the capsule up to microphone level. You still need a
>> microphone preamp.
>
> So then why would you not want to get the version that is just the
> capsule? The collette or whatever it is? If I have to get a preamp,
> I'm thinking somewhere in the $1500 range, something warm, not too high
> frequency focused.

You are missing the point made earlier. The "preamp" used by the Schoeps (or
any other capsule/body mic system) is NOT THE SAME AS A MIC PREAMP.

Even though they share the same name. It's confusing the first time you
encounter it.

Ty ford




-- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
stuff are at www.tyford.com
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 1:38:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Let's please agree on the following terms, even though they have
problems; I think they have been standard usage for decades:

Microphone amplifier = the part of a condenser microphone which
polarizes (charges) the microphone's capsule and translates its very
high-impedance signal into low impedance for output through a
microphone cable. In professional equipment, the _output_ of this
circuit is almost always balanced.

Microphone preamplifier = a circuit, which may be in an outboard piece
of equipment or part of a mixer, console or recorder, which raises the
microphone's signal level to line level so that it can be recorded or
broadcast. In professional equipment, the _input_ of this circuit is
almost always balanced, and phantom powering will often be made
available there as well.

Schoeps' literature and Web site uses these terms in this way. The CMC
("Colette") series microphones are modular--the capsules and amplifiers
are separate parts which are combined to form complete microphones. The
CCM series is smaller but it isn't modular--so as Scott points out, if
you buy a pair of those and you later decide that you want another
pattern or type of capsule (as many Schoeps customers ultimately do),
you end up paying for the built-in amplifier twice, which is a
considerable extra expense. And you can get (in effect) the same
miniature size by using Colette "active cables" with the modular CMC
series.

--best regards
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 3:17:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<inkexit@yahoo.com> wrote:
>Scott Dorsey wrote:
>> <inkexit@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> >So then why would you not want to get the version that is just the
>> >capsule? The collette or whatever it is? If I have to get a preamp,
>> >I'm thinking somewhere in the $1500 range, something warm, not too high
>> >frequency focused.
>>
>> I'm not sure what you're talking about, because the Collette is a whole
>> series of mikes.
>
>OKay, not collette, the 'compact' series, the small ones with no
>microphone preamp. Here is a good link:
>
>http://www.schoeps.de/E-2004/cmc.html

I don't have web access today. But the Compact stuff is what they call
the CCM series, right? The CCM-L is the capsule plus "preamp" integrated
into a small case with a Lemo connector on the back.

The good news is that it's smaller than the normal Collette mikes, and
that can be a help for stereo miking where profile is important. The
bad news is that since the capsule and preamp are built together, you
cannot interchange capsules and instead you need to buy a dozen mikes
in order to get a variety of different patterns. That gets expensive fast.

This is a fairly new line... Schoeps has only built these for a couple
years now and I don't know anybody that has actually used them.

But the CCM mikes, just like the Collette mikes, have to be plugged
into a preamp with phantom power.

>This page is about what I thought were the preamps, they even talk
>about phantom powering and all that. The small mics that I was
>refering to are on the left side of the page attached to stands.

The regular Colette microphones consist of a "preamp" handle which
connects to a capsule. You plug the output of the "preamp" handle into
your preamp which supplies phantom power to it. The Collette also
comes with a variety of active cables that you can put between the
handle and the capsule if you want to extend them.

>Oh, I'm sure, but I'm still pretty blown away with what my little phase
>24 can do at the moment. And oh, I make 7.90 an hour, 3k for mics, 3k
>for a pre, and 3k for a convertor just aint happenin. And shoot, I
>didn't even know the Schoeps sold for that much, the last time I priced
>them they were about $1500 for a pair (and that was pushin it).

In that case, get something like the AT 4053 or the Josephson Series Four
which is a good starting set, and go out and do some stereo miking and
get the hang of it. If you aren't actively doing this kind of work,
spending money for top of the line equipment isn't going to be enough
to let you bill top of the line prices. If you can't make your money
back by buying something, don't buy it.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 4:18:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<inkexit@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1122176500.543071.238820@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Scott Dorsey wrote:
> > <inkexit@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > >So then why would you not want to get the version that is just the
> > >capsule? The collette or whatever it is? If I have to get a preamp,
> > >I'm thinking somewhere in the $1500 range, something warm, not too high
> > >frequency focused.
> >
> > I'm not sure what you're talking about, because the Collette is a whole
> > series of mikes.
>
> OKay, not collette, the 'compact' series, the small ones with no
> microphone preamp. Here is a good link:
>
> http://www.schoeps.de/E-2004/cmc.html
>
> This page is about what I thought were the preamps, they even talk
> about phantom powering and all that. The small mics that I was
> refering to are on the left side of the page attached to stands.
>
>
> > >Ouch! Not cheesy. Very nice external 24 bit card. You must be
> > >thinking of that 16 bit soundblaster I recorded the last thing I sent
> > >you on, 'Attacca.'
> >
> > Compare it with a Prism or the higher grade Lavry stuff and you will
> > be shocked. If you're spending $3k for a pair of mikes, you're probably
> > also looking to spend something in the $3k to $5k range for a 2-channel
> > converter to match.
>
> Oh, I'm sure, but I'm still pretty blown away with what my little phase
> 24 can do at the moment. And oh, I make 7.90 an hour, 3k for mics, 3k
> for a pre, and 3k for a convertor just aint happenin. And shoot, I
> didn't even know the Schoeps sold for that much, the last time I priced
> them they were about $1500 for a pair (and that was pushin it).


You might consider starting with something less expensive, then. A pair of
Oktava MC012s from Sound Room coupled with a decent preamp could get you a
long way.

Predrag
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 5:42:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

David Satz <DSatz@msn.com> wrote:
>Let's please agree on the following terms, even though they have
>problems; I think they have been standard usage for decades:
>
>Microphone amplifier = the part of a condenser microphone which
>polarizes (charges) the microphone's capsule and translates its very
>high-impedance signal into low impedance for output through a
>microphone cable. In professional equipment, the _output_ of this
>circuit is almost always balanced.

I like the word "impedance converter" for this, actually. Because
that's most of what the thing does. (You can argue that there is
other stuff in there and that only part of the stuff in the handle
is the actual impedance converter stage, though.)

B&K uses the word "follower" for this because their early designs
were all cathode followers and the nomenclature seems to have stuck.

But I'll buy "amplifier" or "handle amplifier" too.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 12:37:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <dc0ju6$fl5$1@panix2.panix.com> kludge@panix.com writes:

> I like the word "impedance converter" for this, actually. Because
> that's most of what the thing does.

Yeah, but with all the emphasis these days on the importance of
microphone preamp input impedance, if you call the mic amplifier what
it really is, people will want to know what impedance it converts to
so they'll know what preamp to buy.

Maybe we should just call it the other part of the microphone since
everyone knows "capsule" and "diaphragm" (often used interchangeably
and incorrectly).



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 1:27:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Scott Dorsey" <kludge@panix.com> wrote in message
news:D c0ju6$fl5$1@panix2.panix.com...
> David Satz <DSatz@msn.com> wrote:
> >Let's please agree on the following terms, even though they have
> >problems; I think they have been standard usage for decades:
> >
> >Microphone amplifier = the part of a condenser microphone which
> >polarizes (charges) the microphone's capsule and translates its very
> >high-impedance signal into low impedance for output through a
> >microphone cable. In professional equipment, the _output_ of this
> >circuit is almost always balanced.
>
> I like the word "impedance converter" for this, actually. Because
> that's most of what the thing does. (You can argue that there is
> other stuff in there and that only part of the stuff in the handle
> is the actual impedance converter stage, though.)
>
> B&K uses the word "follower" for this because their early designs
> were all cathode followers and the nomenclature seems to have stuck.
>
> But I'll buy "amplifier" or "handle amplifier" too.
> --scott
> --
> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."


Or "capsule amplifier"?

Predrag
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 5:50:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Predrag Trpkov wrote:
> <inkexit@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1122176500.543071.238820@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

> > Oh, I'm sure, but I'm still pretty blown away with what my little phase
> > 24 can do at the moment. And oh, I make 7.90 an hour, 3k for mics, 3k
> > for a pre, and 3k for a convertor just aint happenin. And shoot, I
> > didn't even know the Schoeps sold for that much, the last time I priced
> > them they were about $1500 for a pair (and that was pushin it).
>
>
> You might consider starting with something less expensive, then. A pair of
> Oktava MC012s from Sound Room coupled with a decent preamp could get you a
> long way.
>
> Predrag

These look nice, especially since they come with three different
capsules! Sound Room's price for one was $350. They also offer stereo
matched pairs (of all capsules) in a nice cedar box. Couldn't find a
price on this package, but I imagine it would be round about $1000.
That works nicely. Hows about preamps? I have asked about this
before, the Broadhurst Gardens BG1:

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/dec03/articles/davelect...

No one really had had much experience with them, but I was rather taken
with the review and price, $660 shipped from England. Besides that,
most of the preamp names I know are well outside my price range --
Great River.
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 4:43:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<inkexit@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1122324656.152531.162770@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
>
> Predrag Trpkov wrote:
> > <inkexit@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> > news:1122176500.543071.238820@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> > > Oh, I'm sure, but I'm still pretty blown away with what my little
phase
> > > 24 can do at the moment. And oh, I make 7.90 an hour, 3k for mics, 3k
> > > for a pre, and 3k for a convertor just aint happenin. And shoot, I
> > > didn't even know the Schoeps sold for that much, the last time I
priced
> > > them they were about $1500 for a pair (and that was pushin it).
> >
> >
> > You might consider starting with something less expensive, then. A pair
of
> > Oktava MC012s from Sound Room coupled with a decent preamp could get you
a
> > long way.
> >
> > Predrag
>
> These look nice, especially since they come with three different
> capsules! Sound Room's price for one was $350. They also offer stereo
> matched pairs (of all capsules) in a nice cedar box. Couldn't find a
> price on this package, but I imagine it would be round about $1000.
> That works nicely. Hows about preamps? I have asked about this
> before, the Broadhurst Gardens BG1:
>
> http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/dec03/articles/davelect...
>
> No one really had had much experience with them, but I was rather taken
> with the review and price, $660 shipped from England. Besides that,
> most of the preamp names I know are well outside my price range --
> Great River.


I don't know about the one you mentioned.

One of the leaders in the value for money department and a serious contender
in its own right is undoubtedly FMR RNP.

Predrag
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 8:02:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Eric Toline wrote:

> You understood wrong. Both the Schoeps & Neumann require preamps.
> In fact all microphones require pre amps.


There were several mics marketed over the years
that provided a line level output.

The patented Shure SM82 cardioid condensor,
battery or phantom powered:

http://www.shure.com/pdf/discontinued/sm82.pdf

and the similar EV RE34

The Shure SM82 and the less common EV RE34 were decent
quality remote broadcast mics intended to drive a
phone line.

Crown PZM-11LL

http://www.crownaudio.com/pdf/mics/136455.pdf

None of these oddballs are appropriate for classical recording.

rd
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 4:08:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1122375744.239128.133730@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com> annonn@juno.com writes:

> There were several mics marketed over the years
> that provided a line level output.

The original Neumann U47 practically put out line level. It was Steve
Tremmer of Gotham Audio, the US Neumann importer for many years, who
got it padded down to a more reasonable mic level because people were
complaining that it clipped the front end of their mic preamps.

But I don't think this is what this thread topic is really about.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 11:50:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

RD Jones <annonn@juno.com> wrote:

> Eric Toline wrote:
>
> > You understood wrong. Both the Schoeps & Neumann require preamps.
> > In fact all microphones require pre amps.
>
>
> There were several mics marketed over the years
> that provided a line level output.
>
> The patented Shure SM82
[...]
> and the similar EV RE34
[...]
> Crown PZM-11LL
[...]

> None of these oddballs are appropriate for classical recording.

I designed and built some prototypes for my own use which were
specifically intended for high quality orchestral and similar recording
purposes. They involved some signal matrixing and I decided this was
best done at line level, so the pre-amps were built into the mic control
box and the nominal O/P level was 0dBm (switch-settable).

This allowed me to feed a single mic unit directly into a DAT recorder
at line level with no extra pre-amp or mixer - and the results were
superb when I tried it out myself...

...but...

.... I loaned one of my prototypes to a studio and they reported noise
and hum levels which were higher than I would have expected.

After some questioning, I realised that no-one had bothered to read the
instructions and they had plugged it into a mic pre-amp instead of the
line input on the mixer. When they found the levels were far too high,
they wound my mic gain switch right back, so most of its internal amps
were operating at capsule level, with a gain of near unity, and just
adding noise.


Perhaps one of the things that has put manufacturers off marketing a
decent line-level-output mic is the reception they would get from a
percentage of their customers who wouldn't know how to use it properly.


--
~ Adrian Tuddenham ~
(Remove the ".invalid"s and add ".co.uk" to reply)
www.poppyrecords.co.uk
July 27, 2005 6:05:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 26 Jul 2005 04:02:24 -0700, "RD Jones" <annonn@juno.com> wrote:

Thele made a tube mike that was bother powered off the mains (PSU in
the body and put out line level)
!