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Which Guitar Recording Amp?

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July 23, 2005 6:27:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?

Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

Michael L.

More about : guitar recording amp

Anonymous
July 23, 2005 9:24:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Michael,

Much to the horror of many a self-aggrandizing amp hustler here-

For recording, technology has enabled bypass of the guitar amp. IF
you've got the right signal chain, you can go straight into the board
and ROCK.

Live playing in a large venue, tube amps still rule.

There's no shortage of hateful geezers in complete denial about this.
Live, laugh, love and TRUST your OWN EARS.

Regards,

Marc
(Amps: '59 Tweed R.I. Bassman 5F6A, and '80 MusicMan HD210 One*Fifty)
These are completely unnecessary for recording, but fun to record with,
if (Shure SM57) mic'd in a soundproof studio.

Michael wrote:
> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>
> Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>
> Michael L.
>
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 12:28:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Check out the Crate V32. Lots of class A tone, channel switching, cool
looking.
DaveT
Related resources
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 3:06:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Interesting that you think 15-30 watt amps are recording amps (unless you're
in a soundproof studio or don't need to worry about neighbors). I always
think of "recording amps" as a few watts, like the Fargen Bastage (described
as a recording/bedroom amp, 4 watts) or an Emery Superbaby (6-12 I think,
depending on which power tube). Me, I'd get an Emery Superbaby (cool choice
of power tubes) or a THD Univalve (with built-in attenuator) for recordning.
They're a bit more than your budget though.
--
Phil Wilson

"Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote in message
news:1122110826.011590.159430@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>
> Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>
> Michael L.
>
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 3:36:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <gHqEe.157925$go.114732@fed1read05> =?ISO-8859-1?Q?U=5FNatural=5F=DForn=5F=DEussy?= writes:

> For recording, technology has enabled bypass of the guitar amp. IF
> you've got the right signal chain, you can go straight into the board
> and ROCK.

That might be a solution to the recording technology, but it doesn't
help the playing psychology. Hearing your guitar come out of the
control room monitors (with the added latency of the software) is
rarely as satisfying as hearing it come out of an instrument
amplifier, even a small one, in the conventional position.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
July 23, 2005 3:41:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Phil:

I have no worries about neighbors so a 15-30 watt is fine.

I think the Emery Superbaby you mention is made by the same guy who
created the ADA Rocket A20R. I really want to get feedback on this amp
(no pun intended) comparing it with the other amps I mentioned.

Thanks,

Michael L.
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 3:55:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Mesa Mark series combo (probably Mark III in your range), but MUST have
optional EQ and Reverb. Look for the 60W model, it has a better
sounding speaker, and 60W in that amp will get gig levels, anyway. No
need for 100W. Going rate seems to be about $700, but you may find one
at $600. This amp will do NICE clean with reverb, all the way to insane
gain. Toss those distortion stomp boxes!

Michael wrote:
> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>
> Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>
> Michael L.
>
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 5:08:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

about 5 years ago i was in a "rock" band. the best sound i found for
distortion was a marshall 900 series amp. i had the anniversary model
but i believe any of the 900 series will give you that great rock
sound. its got great attack and defined punchy bottoms. very live and
exciting to hear. no wonder so many people use them for rock. you can
maybe get one for $400 used.

currently i use a lot of clean guitar (strat deluxe plus) and i think
the fender twin reissue kills for clean. kills the mesa stuff, kills
the marshall (marshalls clean tone blows in my humble opinion, at least
in thier tube stuff). i auditioned everything in guitar center and no
one was even close.

they cost about a grand new maybe used for $600.

i guess this isn't a huge revelation. both of those amps are staples
for thier dirty and clean tones respectively.

i really can't chime in on the guitar processor discussion. except that
i haven't personally ever heard a processor that sounded like an amp.
they always sound at least a little different to me. less live, less
punchy, more controlled. now thats not to say bad. some people like
that sound. and i haven't made an effort to listen to every processor
out there either.

i don't think there is anything in am amp that can get both of these
tones so you may have to choose (or go with some type of simulation
software). also the idea of throwing a pedal on a clean amp and getting
a great dirty tone seems unlikey.

the marshall and fender i mentioned are engineered very differently. i
doubt any pedal will take you from one to the other.

you may be able to look for amps with marshall 900 and fender twin-ish
sound that are less expensive.

my 2 cents.

my 2 cents.
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 7:17:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

I don't complete disagree with the "DI rocks" statement but there are
certain sounds that are hard to get with a simulator. Clean guitars and in
many cases heavily distorted guitars can on many occasion sound better using
a simulator but everything in between are harder to get. Especially if
you´re trying to do only slightly chunchy guitars which will be mixed loudly
in the final cut. It's not so much that they sound artificial but more that
they simple don't have the same "in your face" feel as the real thing. For
those reasons I would pick an amp with a good crunchy sound more than a very
versatile one because the rest can be done quite well with a plugin, a Sans
amp or some of the equivalents.
"U_Natural_ßorn_Þussy" <mister@yourthroat.edu> skrev i en meddelelse
news:gHqEe.157925$go.114732@fed1read05...
> Michael,
>
> Much to the horror of many a self-aggrandizing amp hustler here-
>
> For recording, technology has enabled bypass of the guitar amp. IF you've
> got the right signal chain, you can go straight into the board and ROCK.
>
> Live playing in a large venue, tube amps still rule.
>
> There's no shortage of hateful geezers in complete denial about this.
> Live, laugh, love and TRUST your OWN EARS.
>
> Regards,
>
> Marc
> (Amps: '59 Tweed R.I. Bassman 5F6A, and '80 MusicMan HD210 One*Fifty)
> These are completely unnecessary for recording, but fun to record with, if
> (Shure SM57) mic'd in a soundproof studio.
>
> Michael wrote:
>> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
>> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
>> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
>> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
>> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
>> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
>> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
>> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
>> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>>
>> Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>>
>> Michael L.
>>
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 7:18:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

If you want good clean tone, lose the Lace pickups...

On 23 Jul 2005 02:27:06 -0700, "Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote:

>I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
>Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
>style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
>preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
>pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
>I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
>one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
>one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
>than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>
>Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>
>Michael L.




your name here!
July 23, 2005 7:40:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

What I find myself doing more and more is to record the guitar direct with a
good preamp clean to a track and then trying various amp simulators to get
the right sound (in the mix).

Then, if I can't tweak the sound I want with virtual amp models, I send the
guitar track out to a real live amp and mic the amp (reamping) to get the
sound I'm looking for.

I use a Fender Cybertwin amp for this purpose. I find that I really don't
like the sound of this amp with an acutal guitar plugged into it, but for
some reason it works great for reamping.

malachi


"HKC" <henrikkrogh@mail.dk> wrote in message
news:42e24386$0$27179$edfadb0f@dread14.news.tele.dk...
>I don't complete disagree with the "DI rocks" statement but there are
>certain sounds that are hard to get with a simulator. Clean guitars and in
>many cases heavily distorted guitars can on many occasion sound better
>using a simulator but everything in between are harder to get. Especially
>if you´re trying to do only slightly chunchy guitars which will be mixed
>loudly in the final cut. It's not so much that they sound artificial but
>more that they simple don't have the same "in your face" feel as the real
>thing. For those reasons I would pick an amp with a good crunchy sound more
>than a very versatile one because the rest can be done quite well with a
>plugin, a Sans amp or some of the equivalents.
> "U_Natural_ßorn_Þussy" <mister@yourthroat.edu> skrev i en meddelelse
> news:gHqEe.157925$go.114732@fed1read05...
>> Michael,
>>
>> Much to the horror of many a self-aggrandizing amp hustler here-
>>
>> For recording, technology has enabled bypass of the guitar amp. IF you've
>> got the right signal chain, you can go straight into the board and ROCK.
>>
>> Live playing in a large venue, tube amps still rule.
>>
>> There's no shortage of hateful geezers in complete denial about this.
>> Live, laugh, love and TRUST your OWN EARS.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Marc
>> (Amps: '59 Tweed R.I. Bassman 5F6A, and '80 MusicMan HD210 One*Fifty)
>> These are completely unnecessary for recording, but fun to record with,
>> if (Shure SM57) mic'd in a soundproof studio.
>>
>> Michael wrote:
>>> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
>>> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
>>> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
>>> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
>>> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
>>> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
>>> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
>>> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
>>> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>>>
>>> Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>>>
>>> Michael L.
>>>
>
>
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 9:40:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Sounds cool Malachi. I think maybe you just found a niche for that amp!

Malachi wrote:
> What I find myself doing more and more is to record the guitar direct with a
> good preamp clean to a track and then trying various amp simulators to get
> the right sound (in the mix).
>
> Then, if I can't tweak the sound I want with virtual amp models, I send the
> guitar track out to a real live amp and mic the amp (reamping) to get the
> sound I'm looking for.
>
> I use a Fender Cybertwin amp for this purpose. I find that I really don't
> like the sound of this amp with an acutal guitar plugged into it, but for
> some reason it works great for reamping.
>
> malachi
>
>
> "HKC" <henrikkrogh@mail.dk> wrote in message
> news:42e24386$0$27179$edfadb0f@dread14.news.tele.dk...
>
>>I don't complete disagree with the "DI rocks" statement but there are
>>certain sounds that are hard to get with a simulator. Clean guitars and in
>>many cases heavily distorted guitars can on many occasion sound better
>>using a simulator but everything in between are harder to get. Especially
>>if you´re trying to do only slightly chunchy guitars which will be mixed
>>loudly in the final cut. It's not so much that they sound artificial but
>>more that they simple don't have the same "in your face" feel as the real
>>thing. For those reasons I would pick an amp with a good crunchy sound more
>>than a very versatile one because the rest can be done quite well with a
>>plugin, a Sans amp or some of the equivalents.
>>"U_Natural_ßorn_Þussy" <mister@yourthroat.edu> skrev i en meddelelse
>>news:gHqEe.157925$go.114732@fed1read05...
>>
>>>Michael,
>>>
>>>Much to the horror of many a self-aggrandizing amp hustler here-
>>>
>>>For recording, technology has enabled bypass of the guitar amp. IF you've
>>>got the right signal chain, you can go straight into the board and ROCK.
>>>
>>>Live playing in a large venue, tube amps still rule.
>>>
>>>There's no shortage of hateful geezers in complete denial about this.
>>>Live, laugh, love and TRUST your OWN EARS.
>>>
>>>Regards,
>>>
>>>Marc
>>>(Amps: '59 Tweed R.I. Bassman 5F6A, and '80 MusicMan HD210 One*Fifty)
>>>These are completely unnecessary for recording, but fun to record with,
>>>if (Shure SM57) mic'd in a soundproof studio.
>>>
>>>Michael wrote:
>>>
>>>>I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
>>>>Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
>>>>style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
>>>>preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
>>>>pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
>>>>I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
>>>>one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
>>>>one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
>>>>than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>>>>
>>>>Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>>>>
>>>>Michael L.
>>>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 9:47:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Michael wrote:

> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>
> Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>
> Michael L.
>

We really don't know what you need yet. My guess is the
Classic 30, or the Blues Jr.

Then again, a Marshall valvestate can be a fine recording
amp.

--
Les Cargill
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 10:07:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

U_Natural_ßorn_Þussy wrote:
> Michael,
>
> Much to the horror of many a self-aggrandizing amp hustler here-
>
> For recording, technology has enabled bypass of the guitar amp. IF
> you've got the right signal chain, you can go straight into the board
> and ROCK.
>
> Live playing in a large venue, tube amps still rule.
>
> There's no shortage of hateful geezers in complete denial about this.
> Live, laugh, love and TRUST your OWN EARS.
>
> Regards,
>
> Marc
> (Amps: '59 Tweed R.I. Bassman 5F6A, and '80 MusicMan HD210 One*Fifty)
> These are completely unnecessary for recording, but fun to record with,
> if (Shure SM57) mic'd in a soundproof studio.
>
> Michael wrote:
> > I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> > Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> > style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> > preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> > pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> > I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> > one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> > one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> > than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
> >
> > Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
> >
> > Michael L.
> >

Yeah maybe if your talking about amateur home recording.

Walk into any pro studio and it's 99% tube.

Chris
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 10:09:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Phil Wilson wrote:
> Interesting that you think 15-30 watt amps are recording amps (unless you're
> in a soundproof studio or don't need to worry about neighbors). I always
> think of "recording amps" as a few watts, like the Fargen Bastage (described
> as a recording/bedroom amp, 4 watts) or an Emery Superbaby (6-12 I think,
> depending on which power tube). Me, I'd get an Emery Superbaby (cool choice
> of power tubes) or a THD Univalve (with built-in attenuator) for recordning.
> They're a bit more than your budget though.
> --
> Phil Wilson
>
> "Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote in message
> news:1122110826.011590.159430@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> > I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> > Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> > style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> > preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> > pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> > I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> > one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> > one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> > than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
> >
> > Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
> >
> > Michael L.
> >

Am I the only person on this NG who when someone mentions playing live
doesn't think of the local open mic blues jam and when someone mentions
recording doesn't immefiately think of sitting in front of their home
computer playing to a drum machine?

When I think live I think 1000 capacity venue packed.

When i think recording I think pro studio 2" tape.

Chris
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 10:23:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Great. SWWC

Guncho wrote:
>
> U_Natural_ßorn_Þussy wrote:
>
>>Michael,
>>
>>Much to the horror of many a self-aggrandizing amp hustler here-
>>
>>For recording, technology has enabled bypass of the guitar amp. IF
>>you've got the right signal chain, you can go straight into the board
>>and ROCK.
>>
>>Live playing in a large venue, tube amps still rule.
>>
>>There's no shortage of hateful geezers in complete denial about this.
>>Live, laugh, love and TRUST your OWN EARS.
>>
>>Regards,
>>
>>Marc
>>(Amps: '59 Tweed R.I. Bassman 5F6A, and '80 MusicMan HD210 One*Fifty)
>>These are completely unnecessary for recording, but fun to record with,
>>if (Shure SM57) mic'd in a soundproof studio.
>>
>>Michael wrote:
>>
>>>I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
>>>Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
>>>style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
>>>preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
>>>pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
>>>I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
>>>one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
>>>one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
>>>than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>>>
>>>Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>>>
>>>Michael L.
>>>
>
>
> Yeah maybe if your talking about amateur home recording.
>
> Walk into any pro studio and it's 99% tube.
>
> Chris
>
Anonymous
July 23, 2005 10:25:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

That's because your "thinking" is *incredibly* myopic and limited.

Guncho wrote:

> Am I the only person on this NG who when someone mentions playing live
> doesn't think of the local open mic blues jam and when someone mentions
> recording doesn't immefiately think of sitting in front of their home
> computer playing to a drum machine?
>
> When I think live I think 1000 capacity venue packed.
>
> When i think recording I think pro studio 2" tape.
>
> Chris
>
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 1:45:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Guncho wrote:
>
>
>
> Am I the only person on this NG who when someone mentions playing live
> doesn't think of the local open mic blues jam and when someone mentions
> recording doesn't immefiately think of sitting in front of their home
> computer playing to a drum machine?
>
> When I think live I think 1000 capacity venue packed.
>
> When i think recording I think pro studio 2" tape.

No offense intended here, but i really have to question how often you do
either.
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 1:54:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Pignose.

Don't laugh. Try it.
You'll be absolutely shocked.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 4:52:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Michael wrote:
> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>
> Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>
> Michael L.
>

I consider myself a guitarist as well as an audio engineer...but
definately a guitarist before anything....the BEST sounding amp I've
ever found by far is the Dr. Z Carmen Ghia ....it's also a very small
amp...I think only about 15-20 watts. I've heard that other Dr. Z amps
such as the Maz series and others sound just as good or better. I could
not find one single flaw with this amp. The tone controls truly "shape"
the tone and not "warp" it.....I swear it is impossible to make this amp
sound harsh and brittle or muddy and dull.....the tone knob sweeps from
round and bassy to crisp and sparkly....really I can't recommend this
amp enough.

Anyhow, I truly believe that a great sound "on tape" starts with a great
sound in the ears. So if the amp sounds great and you're a mildly
compotent engineer you'll get a great recording. Anyhow, just my $.02

Jonny Durango
July 24, 2005 5:16:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Michael wrote:
>
> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>
> Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>
> Michael L.

The ADA is a very responsive little amp, get it, and it it doesn't do
everything you need, you can always sell it or get a second amp down the
road. The Pro JR is a nice little amp, or get a Mesa Boogie 22+ Caliber
which is a great all around amp with recording out.
July 24, 2005 6:27:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:
>
> Pignose.
>
> Don't laugh. Try it.
> You'll be absolutely shocked.
> --scott

I like the way you can change the tone by opening the back different
amounts (or not at all). However the volume control gets too loud too
fast to adjust easily.
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 7:21:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Guncho wrote:

>
> Phil Wilson wrote:
>
>>Interesting that you think 15-30 watt amps are recording amps (unless you're
>>in a soundproof studio or don't need to worry about neighbors). I always
>>think of "recording amps" as a few watts, like the Fargen Bastage (described
>>as a recording/bedroom amp, 4 watts) or an Emery Superbaby (6-12 I think,
>>depending on which power tube). Me, I'd get an Emery Superbaby (cool choice
>>of power tubes) or a THD Univalve (with built-in attenuator) for recordning.
>>They're a bit more than your budget though.
>>--
>>Phil Wilson
>>
>>"Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote in message
>>news:1122110826.011590.159430@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>
>>>I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
>>>Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
>>>style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
>>>preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
>>>pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
>>>I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
>>>one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
>>>one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
>>>than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>>>
>>>Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>>>
>>>Michael L.
>>>
>
>
> Am I the only person on this NG who when someone mentions playing live
> doesn't think of the local open mic blues jam and when someone mentions
> recording doesn't immefiately think of sitting in front of their home
> computer playing to a drum machine?
>
> When I think live I think 1000 capacity venue packed.
>
> When i think recording I think pro studio 2" tape.
>
> Chris
>

That's good thinking, but it might be 20 years out of date.

The going got weird, and the weird turned pro.

Especially with respect to "pro studio 2\" tape". And
you might get a thousand people into a Hard Rock Cafe,
but...

--
Les Cargill
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 2:13:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

jdavyd williams wrote:
> Guncho wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> > Am I the only person on this NG who when someone mentions playing live
> > doesn't think of the local open mic blues jam and when someone mentions
> > recording doesn't immefiately think of sitting in front of their home
> > computer playing to a drum machine?
> >
> > When I think live I think 1000 capacity venue packed.
> >
> > When i think recording I think pro studio 2" tape.
>
> No offense intended here, but i really have to question how often you do
> either.

I've played many gigs at the top venues in Vancouver and Toronto and
recorded in a few pro studios.

www.garageband.com/starstar
www.garageband.com/chrisgunter

www.horseshoetavern.com
www.s2n.net

Chris
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 2:14:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Les Cargill wrote:
> Guncho wrote:
>
> >
> > Phil Wilson wrote:
> >
> >>Interesting that you think 15-30 watt amps are recording amps (unless you're
> >>in a soundproof studio or don't need to worry about neighbors). I always
> >>think of "recording amps" as a few watts, like the Fargen Bastage (described
> >>as a recording/bedroom amp, 4 watts) or an Emery Superbaby (6-12 I think,
> >>depending on which power tube). Me, I'd get an Emery Superbaby (cool choice
> >>of power tubes) or a THD Univalve (with built-in attenuator) for recordning.
> >>They're a bit more than your budget though.
> >>--
> >>Phil Wilson
> >>
> >>"Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote in message
> >>news:1122110826.011590.159430@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >>
> >>>I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> >>>Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> >>>style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> >>>preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> >>>pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> >>>I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> >>>one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> >>>one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> >>>than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
> >>>
> >>>Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
> >>>
> >>>Michael L.
> >>>
> >
> >
> > Am I the only person on this NG who when someone mentions playing live
> > doesn't think of the local open mic blues jam and when someone mentions
> > recording doesn't immefiately think of sitting in front of their home
> > computer playing to a drum machine?
> >
> > When I think live I think 1000 capacity venue packed.
> >
> > When i think recording I think pro studio 2" tape.
> >
> > Chris
> >
>
> That's good thinking, but it might be 20 years out of date.
>
> The going got weird, and the weird turned pro.
>
> Especially with respect to "pro studio 2\" tape". And
> you might get a thousand people into a Hard Rock Cafe,
> but...
>
> --
> Les Cargill

What's 20 years out of date?

20 years ago I was 12.
I recorded on 2" tape like 3 years ago.

Chris
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 2:22:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

"Getting it right in the mix" NEVER works for me.


"Malachi" <malachiLOSETHISTOREPLY@trentes.com> wrote in message
news:cytEe.3010$fx4.2048@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
> What I find myself doing more and more is to record the guitar direct with
> a good preamp clean to a track and then trying various amp simulators to
> get the right sound (in the mix).
>
> Then, if I can't tweak the sound I want with virtual amp models, I send
> the guitar track out to a real live amp and mic the amp (reamping) to get
> the sound I'm looking for.
>
> I use a Fender Cybertwin amp for this purpose. I find that I really don't
> like the sound of this amp with an acutal guitar plugged into it, but for
> some reason it works great for reamping.
>
> malachi
>
>
> "HKC" <henrikkrogh@mail.dk> wrote in message
> news:42e24386$0$27179$edfadb0f@dread14.news.tele.dk...
>>I don't complete disagree with the "DI rocks" statement but there are
>>certain sounds that are hard to get with a simulator. Clean guitars and in
>>many cases heavily distorted guitars can on many occasion sound better
>>using a simulator but everything in between are harder to get. Especially
>>if you´re trying to do only slightly chunchy guitars which will be mixed
>>loudly in the final cut. It's not so much that they sound artificial but
>>more that they simple don't have the same "in your face" feel as the real
>>thing. For those reasons I would pick an amp with a good crunchy sound
>>more than a very versatile one because the rest can be done quite well
>>with a plugin, a Sans amp or some of the equivalents.
>> "U_Natural_ßorn_Þussy" <mister@yourthroat.edu> skrev i en meddelelse
>> news:gHqEe.157925$go.114732@fed1read05...
>>> Michael,
>>>
>>> Much to the horror of many a self-aggrandizing amp hustler here-
>>>
>>> For recording, technology has enabled bypass of the guitar amp. IF
>>> you've got the right signal chain, you can go straight into the board
>>> and ROCK.
>>>
>>> Live playing in a large venue, tube amps still rule.
>>>
>>> There's no shortage of hateful geezers in complete denial about this.
>>> Live, laugh, love and TRUST your OWN EARS.
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>>
>>> Marc
>>> (Amps: '59 Tweed R.I. Bassman 5F6A, and '80 MusicMan HD210 One*Fifty)
>>> These are completely unnecessary for recording, but fun to record with,
>>> if (Shure SM57) mic'd in a soundproof studio.
>>>
>>> Michael wrote:
>>>> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
>>>> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
>>>> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
>>>> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
>>>> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
>>>> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
>>>> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
>>>> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
>>>> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>>>>
>>>> Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>>>>
>>>> Michael L.
>>>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 6:16:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

"Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote in message
news:1122110826.011590.159430@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>
> Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>

The blues Jr (and the pro jr.) is a must-hear budget choice. You can play
clean or distorted, and the blues jr. has some bells and whistles and both
amps sound very much like a 'classic' Fender amp. You really need to take
your guitar, the way it is set up, and go plug it in to one and see if you
like the way it sounds and interacts with your guitar.

I prefer small amps for recording and both of these work fine. Most of the
tonal variety you get will come from the guitar and anything else in the
chain, IMO as it should be. However, I sometimes use a modelling processor
and these amps are distinctive enough not to work well in that application.
I usually use something with a wider range that a guitar amp for that.

jb

jb
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 7:03:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

In article <1122110826.011590.159430@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
"Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote:

> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> preferable than good distortion

I am partial to the Soldano Reverb-o-sonic, which has a nicer clean tone
than Fender and the distortion channel is pretty good too. There are
plenty of other so-called boutique amps that you can get used for $600 as
well. Soldano also has some smaller amps that may be around $600 new.

--
Jedd Haas - Artist
http://www.gallerytungsten.com
http://www.antijazz.com
http://www.epsno.com
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 7:13:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Egg-sellent ;-)

Les Cargill wrote:
> Guncho wrote:
>
>>
>> Phil Wilson wrote:
>>
>>> Interesting that you think 15-30 watt amps are recording amps (unless
>>> you're
>>> in a soundproof studio or don't need to worry about neighbors). I always
>>> think of "recording amps" as a few watts, like the Fargen Bastage
>>> (described
>>> as a recording/bedroom amp, 4 watts) or an Emery Superbaby (6-12 I
>>> think,
>>> depending on which power tube). Me, I'd get an Emery Superbaby (cool
>>> choice
>>> of power tubes) or a THD Univalve (with built-in attenuator) for
>>> recordning.
>>> They're a bit more than your budget though.
>>> --
>>> Phil Wilson
>>>
>>> "Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote in message
>>> news:1122110826.011590.159430@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>>
>>>> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
>>>> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
>>>> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
>>>> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
>>>> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
>>>> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
>>>> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
>>>> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
>>>> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>>>>
>>>> Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>>>>
>>>> Michael L.
>>>>
>>
>>
>> Am I the only person on this NG who when someone mentions playing live
>> doesn't think of the local open mic blues jam and when someone mentions
>> recording doesn't immefiately think of sitting in front of their home
>> computer playing to a drum machine?
>>
>> When I think live I think 1000 capacity venue packed.
>>
>> When i think recording I think pro studio 2" tape.
>>
>> Chris
>>
>
> That's good thinking, but it might be 20 years out of date.
>
> The going got weird, and the weird turned pro.
>
> Especially with respect to "pro studio 2\" tape". And
> you might get a thousand people into a Hard Rock Cafe,
> but...
>
> --
> Les Cargill
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 7:14:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

And I was 28. Yer still a punk.

Guncho wrote:
>
> Les Cargill wrote:
>
>>Guncho wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Phil Wilson wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Interesting that you think 15-30 watt amps are recording amps (unless you're
>>>>in a soundproof studio or don't need to worry about neighbors). I always
>>>>think of "recording amps" as a few watts, like the Fargen Bastage (described
>>>>as a recording/bedroom amp, 4 watts) or an Emery Superbaby (6-12 I think,
>>>>depending on which power tube). Me, I'd get an Emery Superbaby (cool choice
>>>>of power tubes) or a THD Univalve (with built-in attenuator) for recordning.
>>>>They're a bit more than your budget though.
>>>>--
>>>>Phil Wilson
>>>>
>>>>"Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote in message
>>>>news:1122110826.011590.159430@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
>>>>>Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
>>>>>style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
>>>>>preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
>>>>>pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
>>>>>I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
>>>>>one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
>>>>>one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
>>>>>than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>>>>>
>>>>>Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>>>>>
>>>>>Michael L.
>>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Am I the only person on this NG who when someone mentions playing live
>>>doesn't think of the local open mic blues jam and when someone mentions
>>>recording doesn't immefiately think of sitting in front of their home
>>>computer playing to a drum machine?
>>>
>>>When I think live I think 1000 capacity venue packed.
>>>
>>>When i think recording I think pro studio 2" tape.
>>>
>>>Chris
>>>
>>
>>That's good thinking, but it might be 20 years out of date.
>>
>>The going got weird, and the weird turned pro.
>>
>>Especially with respect to "pro studio 2\" tape". And
>>you might get a thousand people into a Hard Rock Cafe,
>>but...
>>
>>--
>>Les Cargill
>
>
> What's 20 years out of date?
>
> 20 years ago I was 12.
> I recorded on 2" tape like 3 years ago.
>
> Chris
>
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 8:02:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Les Cargill wrote:
> Guncho wrote:
>
> >
> > Les Cargill wrote:
> >
> >>Guncho wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>Phil Wilson wrote:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>Interesting that you think 15-30 watt amps are recording amps (unless you're
> >>>>in a soundproof studio or don't need to worry about neighbors). I always
> >>>>think of "recording amps" as a few watts, like the Fargen Bastage (described
> >>>>as a recording/bedroom amp, 4 watts) or an Emery Superbaby (6-12 I think,
> >>>>depending on which power tube). Me, I'd get an Emery Superbaby (cool choice
> >>>>of power tubes) or a THD Univalve (with built-in attenuator) for recordning.
> >>>>They're a bit more than your budget though.
> >>>>--
> >>>>Phil Wilson
> >>>>
> >>>>"Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote in message
> >>>>news:1122110826.011590.159430@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>>I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> >>>>>Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> >>>>>style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> >>>>>preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> >>>>>pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> >>>>>I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> >>>>>one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> >>>>>one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> >>>>>than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
> >>>>>
> >>>>>Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
> >>>>>
> >>>>>Michael L.
> >>>>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>Am I the only person on this NG who when someone mentions playing live
> >>>doesn't think of the local open mic blues jam and when someone mentions
> >>>recording doesn't immefiately think of sitting in front of their home
> >>>computer playing to a drum machine?
> >>>
> >>>When I think live I think 1000 capacity venue packed.
> >>>
> >>>When i think recording I think pro studio 2" tape.
> >>>
> >>>Chris
> >>>
> >>
> >>That's good thinking, but it might be 20 years out of date.
> >>
> >>The going got weird, and the weird turned pro.
> >>
> >>Especially with respect to "pro studio 2\" tape". And
> >>you might get a thousand people into a Hard Rock Cafe,
> >>but...
> >>
> >>--
> >>Les Cargill
> >
> >
> > What's 20 years out of date?
> >
> > 20 years ago I was 12.
> > I recorded on 2" tape like 3 years ago.
> >
> > Chris
> >
>
> Both concepts - "pro 2\" tape" and "audiences
> of thousands" are not sitting on a solid
> foundation.
>
> Venues are disappearing, and recording stuff is
> rapidly going digital .
>
> Venues are gonna exist if and only if they
> act as an attraction point to sell something
> else. Take the Hard Rock in Orlando - it sells
> hotel rooms, meals, other overpriced Disney
> merch. I doubt very seriously that it
> pulls its own weight.
>
> Likewise 2" tape. The dollar cost of a box of 2",
> if you can get it at all , slipped under
> the dollar cost of a harddisk some time back.
> About three years ago.
>
> Perhaps the 2" will be used as a signal processor,
> but the tracks won't live on 2" as
> an archival medium.
>
> Now, the kidz are not even doign the band thing
> per se - they're looping, deejaying and mp3ing.
>
> --
> Les Cargill

Les

No offence but I think you're out of touch with what's currently going
on in music.

The majority of pro bands are still tracking analog and there are lots
of bands packing venues in Canada at least.

Chris
Anonymous
July 24, 2005 9:05:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

> "Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote in message

> > I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> > Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> > style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> > preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> > pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> > I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> > one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> > one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> > than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?

I have good results with my Music Man RD50.
I have 2 of them and they sound different.
Mostly tube with 2 6L6 outputs and a 12AX7
distortion circuit. I normally play a Strat with
Lindy Fralins or DiMarzio stacks but also have other
guitars available including Gibson SG's, a V, and
Hagstroms. They all sound great through the MM.
The clean (solid state) channel is very clean
and Fender-like. The distortion channel is very
usable for blues-rock and sounds better than most
pedals, and can be overdriven further for harder
styles, particularly on the later 'Mid-Shift' version.
Well made amps and the last of the Leo Fender/
George Fullerton/ era Tom Walker designed amps.

The Blues Jr. sounds good for home/studio use IMO
but is somewhat fragile if gigging is a consideration.
I've not played the ADA and don't really care for the Peavey.

rd
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 12:05:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Guncho wrote:

>
> Les Cargill wrote:
>
>>Guncho wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Phil Wilson wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Interesting that you think 15-30 watt amps are recording amps (unless you're
>>>>in a soundproof studio or don't need to worry about neighbors). I always
>>>>think of "recording amps" as a few watts, like the Fargen Bastage (described
>>>>as a recording/bedroom amp, 4 watts) or an Emery Superbaby (6-12 I think,
>>>>depending on which power tube). Me, I'd get an Emery Superbaby (cool choice
>>>>of power tubes) or a THD Univalve (with built-in attenuator) for recordning.
>>>>They're a bit more than your budget though.
>>>>--
>>>>Phil Wilson
>>>>
>>>>"Michael" <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote in message
>>>>news:1122110826.011590.159430@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
>>>>>Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
>>>>>style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
>>>>>preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
>>>>>pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
>>>>>I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
>>>>>one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
>>>>>one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
>>>>>than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
>>>>>
>>>>>Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
>>>>>
>>>>>Michael L.
>>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Am I the only person on this NG who when someone mentions playing live
>>>doesn't think of the local open mic blues jam and when someone mentions
>>>recording doesn't immefiately think of sitting in front of their home
>>>computer playing to a drum machine?
>>>
>>>When I think live I think 1000 capacity venue packed.
>>>
>>>When i think recording I think pro studio 2" tape.
>>>
>>>Chris
>>>
>>
>>That's good thinking, but it might be 20 years out of date.
>>
>>The going got weird, and the weird turned pro.
>>
>>Especially with respect to "pro studio 2\" tape". And
>>you might get a thousand people into a Hard Rock Cafe,
>>but...
>>
>>--
>>Les Cargill
>
>
> What's 20 years out of date?
>
> 20 years ago I was 12.
> I recorded on 2" tape like 3 years ago.
>
> Chris
>

Both concepts - "pro 2\" tape" and "audiences
of thousands" are not sitting on a solid
foundation.

Venues are disappearing, and recording stuff is
rapidly going digital .

Venues are gonna exist if and only if they
act as an attraction point to sell something
else. Take the Hard Rock in Orlando - it sells
hotel rooms, meals, other overpriced Disney
merch. I doubt very seriously that it
pulls its own weight.

Likewise 2" tape. The dollar cost of a box of 2",
if you can get it at all , slipped under
the dollar cost of a harddisk some time back.
About three years ago.

Perhaps the 2" will be used as a signal processor,
but the tracks won't live on 2" as
an archival medium.

Now, the kidz are not even doign the band thing
per se - they're looping, deejaying and mp3ing.

--
Les Cargill
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 8:23:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Hi there,

> The ADA is a very responsive little amp, get it, and it it doesn't do
> everything you need, you can always sell it or get a second amp down the
> road. The Pro JR is a nice little amp, or get a Mesa Boogie 22+ Caliber
> which is a great all around amp with recording out.

Mesa's Caliber is a great, suprisingly versatile little amp with a
great ratio for price/quality. When miked, should be very nice for
recording.

But those 'recording out''s are no good if the sound you are trying to
record has even a bit of overdrive or distortion. Same goes for similar
older Marshall, Fender, or ADA or whatever amps. I just don't know why
they put them in the back of those amps...they just are no good.


Best, Kalle
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 4:12:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

"Jonny Durango" <jonnydurango1BUSH_FROM_OFFICE@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:o tSdndDp89PM1X7fRVn-pw@comcast.com...
> Michael wrote:
> > I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> > Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> > style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> > preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> > pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> > I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> > one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> > one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> > than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?
> >
> > Your help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
> >
> > Michael L.
> >
>
> I consider myself a guitarist as well as an audio engineer...but
> definately a guitarist before anything....the BEST sounding amp I've
> ever found by far is the Dr. Z Carmen Ghia ....it's also a very small
> amp...I think only about 15-20 watts. I've heard that other Dr. Z amps
> such as the Maz series and others sound just as good or better. I could
> not find one single flaw with this amp. The tone controls truly "shape"
> the tone and not "warp" it.....I swear it is impossible to make this amp
> sound harsh and brittle or muddy and dull.....the tone knob sweeps from
> round and bassy to crisp and sparkly....really I can't recommend this
> amp enough.
>
> Anyhow, I truly believe that a great sound "on tape" starts with a great
> sound in the ears. So if the amp sounds great and you're a mildly
> compotent engineer you'll get a great recording. Anyhow, just my $.02
>
> Jonny Durango

The Zs are absolutely fabulous amps, but very expensive. You might, if
you're lucky, find a Ghia in the used market for 650-750.
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 4:53:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

"Roger Christie charter.net>" <rochrist@<REMOVETOEMAIL> wrote in message
news:Zd8Fe.5726$U%6.2226@fe05.lga...
<snip>
> The Zs are absolutely fabulous amps, but very expensive. You might, if
> you're lucky, find a Ghia in the used market for 650-750.
>
Compared to a Peavey, I'd agree with you, but the Z's are *not* expensive
when compared to other 'boutique' amplifiers. No way. Check out a comparable
Bad Cat, or Carr. Z's have gotten pricier recently than they used to be, but
still not bad the last time I looked, considering.
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 5:40:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Capt. Spaulding wrote:
> "Roger Christie charter.net>" <rochrist@<REMOVETOEMAIL> wrote in message
> news:Zd8Fe.5726$U%6.2226@fe05.lga...
> <snip>
>
>>The Zs are absolutely fabulous amps, but very expensive. You might, if
>>you're lucky, find a Ghia in the used market for 650-750.
>>
>
> Compared to a Peavey, I'd agree with you, but the Z's are *not* expensive
> when compared to other 'boutique' amplifiers. No way. Check out a comparable
> Bad Cat, or Carr. Z's have gotten pricier recently than they used to be, but
> still not bad the last time I looked, considering.
>
>

Yep, I agree....the Z's are by no means cheap, but they certainly aren't
overpriced, especially considering the sound quality. I'll put it this
way, I've played a lot of amps that were twice as expensive and sounded
half as good!

Jonny Durango
July 25, 2005 6:05:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

email_kalle@yahoo.com wrote:
>
> Hi there,
>
> > The ADA is a very responsive little amp, get it, and it it doesn't do
> > everything you need, you can always sell it or get a second amp down the
> > road. The Pro JR is a nice little amp, or get a Mesa Boogie 22+ Caliber
> > which is a great all around amp with recording out.
>
> Mesa's Caliber is a great, suprisingly versatile little amp with a
> great ratio for price/quality. When miked, should be very nice for
> recording.
>
> But those 'recording out''s are no good if the sound you are trying to
> record has even a bit of overdrive or distortion. Same goes for similar
> older Marshall, Fender, or ADA or whatever amps. I just don't know why
> they put them in the back of those amps...they just are no good.
>
> Best, Kalle

I'm looking at a schematic of a 22+, the recording out is after the
output xfmr, so you get a padded version of what the speaker gets. I
agree micing generally gets better results, and direct outs are a
different flavor.
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 6:12:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

<genericaudioperson@hotmail.com> wrote in message >
> i would troll the used market for a used all-tube combo amp. the original
> CBS Fender "blackface" Deluxe Reverb is great for recording
> (they are from about 1965-1958). really nice clean sound, and when you
> crank it, it will saturate for some nice blues leads.
>
> if youl looked around, they used to be had for $750. but i haven't priced
> the vintage market in a while.

Your recommendation for a Deluxe Reverb for tone is accurate, but you are
way off what they are now running on the used market. A BF Deluxe Reverb in
good shape is going to run you $2,000 to $3,000 depending on where you are,
and what the condition is of the amp. A Silver Face can still be
occasionally had for under $1,000, but that is even rare these days.

See ya,
John
Anonymous
July 25, 2005 6:29:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

"joe mama" <dmoss74@hotmail.com> wrote in message >
> Save yourself some dough, and get yourself a silverface Fender Champ, or
> Vibro-Champ. I have been recording a lot lately, and these amps are
> indespensible. .
>

Clapton on Layla was an old Champ, and they are used quite commonly today.
It is a SF Champ that has been turned into a Tweed Clone that I use most of
the time around the house, and I've mic'd it and used it in a band
situation, but for that, I would usually use my BF Deluxe Reverb.

See ya,
John
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 12:50:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <xp6dnbTiqf1EyHjfRVn-2g@comcast.com> wheatonjohn@comcast.net writes:

> Your recommendation for a Deluxe Reverb for tone is accurate, but you are
> way off what they are now running on the used market. A BF Deluxe Reverb in
> good shape is going to run you $2,000 to $3,000 depending on where you are,
> and what the condition is of the amp. A Silver Face can still be
> occasionally had for under $1,000, but that is even rare these days.

Looks like someone who isn't a connoisseuer should be thinking about a
new Blues Jr. for about $400. How much better is $2,600 better?



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 6:57:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

Michael <mustang3@mediaone.net> wrote:

> I'm looking for a guitar amp that's good for recording mostly a Fender
> Strat Plus with Lace Sensors and a Gibson Les Paul with PAF's. Music
> style is mostly pop-rock, rock, and blues. Good clean tone is more
> preferable than good distortion since I can get good distortion with
> pedals. Although, good of both is ideal. My budget is up to $600.
> I'm considering ADA Rocket A20R (a rare amp--I have a chance to snag
> one), Peavey Classic 30, Fender Pro Jr., and Fender Blues Jr. Which
> one do you recommend? I heard the ADA is very good. Is it way better
> than the others mentioned? Any others worth considering?

I can't know your tastes or your guitar sound, but my vote would be for
none of the above. If you're stuck at $600, the Fender '65 Deluxe
Reverb reissue is probably the best you'll find in a new amp.
Definitely nothing to complain about.

But if you're looking for a good clean sound, I personally would be
looking for a bigger amp. A Fender Twin Reverb (also the '65 reissue)
would be a fantastic choice, but there are other "100W" tube amps out
there to choose from. I have struggled for years to get a full, rich
clean sound with enough sustain out of even the 50W amps I've been
using (Bassman, Ampeg V2, many others). By the time you get it loud
enough to get the speaker and the strings playing nicely together, you
always end up with some fuzz. It can sound great, but when you want
that rich clean sound it just isn't happening. With the Twin, or a
good old 100W Marshall, or an Ampeg V4 (among others) you can get the
volume you need to move air across the strings before you get into the
overdrive.

If you think I'm weird, take a look at all the pedal steel players in
Nashville who use 400W amps on stage so they can get the clean sustain
they need to sound like a Nashville pedal steel player. Same holds
true for Strats strumming chords. Even when you're in the studio, you
still need to move air. It's part of the instrument we call Electric
Guitar.

The guy who says you don't need an amp just doesn't understand that the
amp is part of the instrument. Not only does this instrument require
an amplifier, it requires a speaker, a room, walls, a floor, and air.

ulysses
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 7:40:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 7/25/05 8:50 PM, in article znr1122329834k@trad, "Mike Rivers"
<mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:

>
> In article <xp6dnbTiqf1EyHjfRVn-2g@comcast.com> wheatonjohn@comcast.net
> writes:
>
>> Your recommendation for a Deluxe Reverb for tone is accurate, but you are
>> way off what they are now running on the used market. A BF Deluxe Reverb in
>> good shape is going to run you $2,000 to $3,000 depending on where you are,
>> and what the condition is of the amp. A Silver Face can still be
>> occasionally had for under $1,000, but that is even rare these days.
>
> Looks like someone who isn't a connoisseuer should be thinking about a
> new Blues Jr. for about $400. How much better is $2,600 better?


Here here... A new BJ (or a cheap old one with the easy fix mods for the
solder-savy) with a better speaker than stock is a truly nice versatile
thing.
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 2:20:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1122364652.afafe0df7d8aee7e55f838638b4fcaa9@teranews> ulyssesnospam@rollmusic.com writes:

> If you think I'm weird, take a look at all the pedal steel players in
> Nashville who use 400W amps on stage so they can get the clean sustain
> they need to sound like a Nashville pedal steel player.

They use the Peavey Session 400 because it's become a cult item among
steel players. It's not because it's 400 watts (is it?) but it does
have the sound that goes well with the steel guitar. These guys never
want an overdriven sound, or when they do, they get it with an effect
device and not by turning up the input gain on the amplifier. And
while I've heard some steel players that are indeed too loud, they
aren't loud in the way, say, Lennie Kravitz is - where loud is an
integral part of the performance.

> The guy who says you don't need an amp just doesn't understand that the
> amp is part of the instrument. Not only does this instrument require
> an amplifier, it requires a speaker, a room, walls, a floor, and air.

Yup. And sometimes they don't have the proper instrument for the music
they're playing or the venue they're playng in. Just like bagpipe
players.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 6:46:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:

> In article <1122364652.afafe0df7d8aee7e55f838638b4fcaa9@teranews> ulyssesnospam@rollmusic.com writes:

>> If you think I'm weird, take a look at all the pedal steel players in
>> Nashville who use 400W amps on stage so they can get the clean sustain
>> they need to sound like a Nashville pedal steel player.

> They use the Peavey Session 400 because it's become a cult item among
> steel players. It's not because it's 400 watts (is it?) but it does
> have the sound that goes well with the steel guitar. These guys never
> want an overdriven sound, or when they do, they get it with an effect
> device and not by turning up the input gain on the amplifier. And
> while I've heard some steel players that are indeed too loud, they
> aren't loud in the way, say, Lennie Kravitz is - where loud is an
> integral part of the performance.

Is that the same as the Peavey Nashville 400? Because that one is a solid
state amp that pedal steel players apparently love to use.

Rob R.
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 7:14:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <dc5ibs$bk1$1@news1.chem.utoronto.ca> reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca writes:

> > They use the Peavey Session 400 because it's become a cult item among
> > steel players. It's not because it's 400 watts (is it?)

> Is that the same as the Peavey Nashville 400? Because that one is a solid
> state amp that pedal steel players apparently love to use.

The Session 400, and the follow-on Session 500 were also solid state
amplifiers. Nominally 200 watts, according to the info on the Peavey
web site. The Nashville series has a different tone control
arrangement and a built-in compressor. I expect that basically they
sound about the same other than differences in speakers (which
admittedly can make a very big difference). There are a number of
speaker options, both size and manufacturer.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 26, 2005 8:15:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 7/26/05 10:46 AM, in article dc5ibs$bk1$1@news1.chem.utoronto.ca, "Rob
Reedijk" <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote:

> Mike Rivers <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:
>
>> In article <1122364652.afafe0df7d8aee7e55f838638b4fcaa9@teranews>
>> ulyssesnospam@rollmusic.com writes:
>
>>> If you think I'm weird, take a look at all the pedal steel players in
>>> Nashville who use 400W amps on stage so they can get the clean sustain
>>> they need to sound like a Nashville pedal steel player.
>
>> They use the Peavey Session 400 because it's become a cult item among
>> steel players. It's not because it's 400 watts (is it?) but it does
>> have the sound that goes well with the steel guitar. These guys never
>> want an overdriven sound, or when they do, they get it with an effect
>> device and not by turning up the input gain on the amplifier. And
>> while I've heard some steel players that are indeed too loud, they
>> aren't loud in the way, say, Lennie Kravitz is - where loud is an
>> integral part of the performance.
>
> Is that the same as the Peavey Nashville 400? Because that one is a solid
> state amp that pedal steel players apparently love to use.
>
> Rob R.

Peavey indeed nailed a reliable and rich sounding solid state amp with the
Session 400, ... the current holy grail steel amp is the several flavors of
a TWIN feeding a single open-back JBL 15. This gets accomplished any way one
can, whether it's buying a ProSonic or finding a rare SuperSix Reverb to mod
or finding any flavor of Twin and replacing the baffleboard appropriately
and finding a speaker that suits (in this use a 4ohm Weber California 15 is
a FRIGHTENINGLY sweet sounding beast). Like ANY instrument, and especially
guitars, that have LIVED for the last 20 years progressively on a
sales-driven GEAR=TONE mandate that ignores the real truth that
PLAYER=TONE... This is all about PLAYER DETAIL COMFORT and that top 5% that
only dogs can hear that makes the custom driver's seat and controls and is
totally PERSONAL... I;ve worked with steel players from young to old,
newbies to Holl O Famers, rockers to Hawaiian to lapsteelers and it does not
MATTER what they have as a front end... whether it's a digital preamp thru
solid state hifi power amp like Jeff Neuman, or semi-retired Nashville
stalwarts with a pair of 100w EVANS combo amps or a old-timer like Leonard T
Zinn (bless his heart) who will plug into ANYTHING... they All still sound
Just Like Themselves barring real malfunctions.
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 1:15:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:

> They use the Peavey Session 400 because it's become a cult item among
> steel players. It's not because it's 400 watts (is it?) but it does
> have the sound that goes well with the steel guitar. These guys never
> want an overdriven sound, or when they do, they get it with an effect
> device and not by turning up the input gain on the amplifier. And
> while I've heard some steel players that are indeed too loud, they
> aren't loud in the way, say, Lennie Kravitz is - where loud is an
> integral part of the performance.

It's 400 Peavey watts.
Which is either 400 watts AC input,
or 400 watts peak,
or 400 watts into 2 ohms.
I think the AC mains voltage runs high in Meridian, MS.

rd
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 2:29:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.music.makers.guitar,rec.audio.pro,alt.guitar.amps (More info?)

hey they have some MP3s of this amp on thier site.
it does sound bitchin'.
http://www.drzamps.com/ghia.html

one thing to consider is that guy playing is really good. a lot of a
persons tone can come from thier playing, how they pick, where they
pick..

anyway, i'd like to see what it sounds like with my hands and guitar.

thanks, dude. good tip.
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 3:31:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:znr1122377116k@trad...
>
> And sometimes they don't have the proper instrument for the music
> they're playing or the venue they're playng in. Just like bagpipe
> players.
>

Not many promoters want to put on shows atop big hills.

jb
!