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Finishing my basement as a studio

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Anonymous
July 27, 2005 3:03:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Greetings!

I am a college student just finishing up my last year. I have a
small studio set up at my rental house at UC that works pretty well for
me. It's an old house, so it's built solid. We put some stuff on the
walls, put the control room upstairs and it has worked well. Now the
problem is that at the end of August my lease is up and I'm going to be
moving back home for a year or so (cue the mama's boy jokes). I really
think recording is a possible career for me so I have to have a studio
set up somewhere.
My parent's house has a pretty decent basement that is unfinished
and for the most part not used for anything. The area I have to work
with is about 16' x 21'. Since I'm not there I can't tell you the
height of the ceiling, but it's probably around 8' or so. Two current
walls are concrete and the other two are just temporary things you can
actually see through. I have found from trying to take naps down there
that you can hear everything from upstairs in addition to all the stuff
downstairs (water heater, AC/furnace, water softener, dehumidifier,
hepa filter, etc).
As is probably assumed by the statements of me being just out of
college and only living at home again for probably a year, that I am on
a very low budget. There is already some really nice, thick carpet
down there thanks to some insurance money.
I guess the requirements for this thing would be as follows:
1. Isolation from upstairs (in both directions)
2. Isolation from the rest of the basement
3. Isolation from the big loud AC unit that is right outside the
windows from the room
4. A decent sound for recording (duh)
- I'm used to a dead, no-room, sound, so I don't have a problem
with having that again
5. Somehow (and I know I'll get flack for this) have a control
room-type thing in this area, whether isolated or I'll just have to be
quiet.
6. Cheap and easy, 'cause I'll most likely be doing this all by myself.

Oh, I have a 100' 24x4 snake if that matters for control room
stuff.

One more thing. I'll probably be recording mainly jazz groups, so
drums will be present. I also expect to at some point get some rock
bands and stuff in there if things go well (wow, I never thought I'd
say that).

Thank you for reading this whole thing and thank you in advance for any
and all advice you can give me.

-Steve
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 9:57:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

elecbanana wrote:

> moving back home for a year or so (cue the mama's boy jokes). I really
> think recording is a possible career for me so I have to have a studio
> set up somewhere.

Reading this post brought back pleasant memories of
sitting in Mom's basement thinking I would be the next
George Martin or Eddie Kramer. (Sometime in the late '60s)

In case you didn't read yesterday's payola headlines
the music biz is in the toilet. It's been spiraling
downward for a few years now, actually.
(cue the file-sharing joke here)

The cold stark reality is that unless you've already
got a successful career going or an incredible amount
of seed money to invest it'll be highly unlikely to
be a "career", more like a money pit.
Go ahead and build the studio but be prepared to
support it - not have it support you.

In case I still have your attention I'll offer the
best I can for your situation.

> My parent's house has a pretty decent basement that is unfinished
> and for the most part not used for anything. The area I have to work
> with is about 16' x 21'. Since I'm not there I can't tell you the
> height of the ceiling, but it's probably around 8' or so. Two current
> walls are concrete and the other two are just temporary things you can
> actually see through. I have found from trying to take naps down there
> that you can hear everything from upstairs in addition to all the stuff
> downstairs (water heater, AC/furnace, water softener, dehumidifier,
> hepa filter, etc).

The only need here is the AC/heat. Put all the rest on a
seperate circuit(s) that can be turned off during sessions.
Just remember to turn it back on.

> As is probably assumed by the statements of me being just out of
> college and only living at home again for probably a year, that I am on
> a very low budget. There is already some really nice, thick carpet
> down there thanks to some insurance money.

Get employment on the merits of your degree. You'll
need a steady stream of income to support the project.
Hopefully this is understood by now and I'll try not
to belabor the point.

Carpeting is OK but must have good underlayment to be
effective over concrete.
The better padding is not much more money.

> I guess the requirements for this thing would be as follows:
> 1. Isolation from upstairs (in both directions)

If not in place now put up a suspended ceiling with decent
quality acoustic tile. Don't even bother with the cheap
thin styro plastic stuff.
If this is going to work you'll need the cooperation
of all the other family members. Certainly Mom will
understand the need to be quiet during sessions.

> 2. Isolation from the rest of the basement

If you can control the AC to the appliances (as noted above)
I wouldn't worry about this.

> 3. Isolation from the big loud AC unit that is right outside the
> windows from the room

This is the big one. The windows will need to be blocked
off and soundproofed as much as possible. Bricking them
over is best but maybe several layers of plywood and
sound absorbative might work. The AC may have a lower
fan speed that can be selected and set to run continuously
instead of cycling to avoid the turn-on pulse that can be
noisy.

> 4. A decent sound for recording (duh)
> - I'm used to a dead, no-room, sound, so I don't have a problem
> with having that again

16x21 is big enough to respond to standard treatment techniques.

> 5. Somehow (and I know I'll get flack for this) have a control
> room-type thing in this area, whether isolated or I'll just have to be
> quiet.

(I know I'll get flack for this but...)
In a room this size you'll be better off having an
'open studio' rather than a smaller room with an
isolated control room. It will obviously make sound
checks more tedious and your equipment that is noisy
(power supplies, computer, anything with a fan)
will need to be isolated some way.

> 6. Cheap and easy, 'cause I'll most likely be doing this all by myself.
>
> Oh, I have a 100' 24x4 snake if that matters for control room
> stuff.

Cheap or easy - pick one.
The snake should be put to use working sound for bands.
This can keep you in touch with potential clients
and maybe put some change in your pocket.
I wouldn't recommend playing in a band because that's a
whole separate money pit.

> One more thing. I'll probably be recording mainly jazz groups, so
> drums will be present. I also expect to at some point get some rock
> bands and stuff in there if things go well (wow, I never thought I'd
> say that).

If you really want to record don't pick your clients,
let them pick you. The first rule of business is don't
turn away paying customers. Record every cubscout
accordion, bagpipe, or rhythm stick artist that comes
along.

> Thank you for reading this whole thing and thank you in advance for any
> and all advice you can give me.

good luck (really)
rd
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 10:25:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

There are actually quite a lot of jobs in audio that don't have to do
with music. Music is what probably got most of us into audio, but
there are a lot more opportunities out there where you can use your
recording, mixing, and mastering skills than just in the music biz.
These jobs are also steady pay to fund your basement recording setup;
and if you're lucky you can borrow their gear.
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 12:23:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pop over to www.recording.org and John L. Sayer's forums at
http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/index.php?sid=ead1683...

ask away...good people, good info

DOn

"elecbanana" <sseifried@fuse.net> wrote in message
news:1122444200.217361.118320@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Greetings!
>
> I am a college student just finishing up my last year. I have a
> small studio set up at my rental house at UC that works pretty well for
> me. It's an old house, so it's built solid. We put some stuff on the
> walls, put the control room upstairs and it has worked well. Now the
> problem is that at the end of August my lease is up and I'm going to be
> moving back home for a year or so (cue the mama's boy jokes). I really
> think recording is a possible career for me so I have to have a studio
> set up somewhere.
> My parent's house has a pretty decent basement that is unfinished
> and for the most part not used for anything. The area I have to work
> with is about 16' x 21'. Since I'm not there I can't tell you the
> height of the ceiling, but it's probably around 8' or so. Two current
> walls are concrete and the other two are just temporary things you can
> actually see through. I have found from trying to take naps down there
> that you can hear everything from upstairs in addition to all the stuff
> downstairs (water heater, AC/furnace, water softener, dehumidifier,
> hepa filter, etc).
> As is probably assumed by the statements of me being just out of
> college and only living at home again for probably a year, that I am on
> a very low budget. There is already some really nice, thick carpet
> down there thanks to some insurance money.
> I guess the requirements for this thing would be as follows:
> 1. Isolation from upstairs (in both directions)
> 2. Isolation from the rest of the basement
> 3. Isolation from the big loud AC unit that is right outside the
> windows from the room
> 4. A decent sound for recording (duh)
> - I'm used to a dead, no-room, sound, so I don't have a problem
> with having that again
> 5. Somehow (and I know I'll get flack for this) have a control
> room-type thing in this area, whether isolated or I'll just have to be
> quiet.
> 6. Cheap and easy, 'cause I'll most likely be doing this all by myself.
>
> Oh, I have a 100' 24x4 snake if that matters for control room
> stuff.
>
> One more thing. I'll probably be recording mainly jazz groups, so
> drums will be present. I also expect to at some point get some rock
> bands and stuff in there if things go well (wow, I never thought I'd
> say that).
>
> Thank you for reading this whole thing and thank you in advance for any
> and all advice you can give me.
>
> -Steve
>
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 1:02:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1122444200.217361.118320@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com> sseifried@fuse.net writes:

> The area I have to work
> with is about 16' x 21'. Since I'm not there I can't tell you the
> height of the ceiling, but it's probably around 8' or so. Two current
> walls are concrete and the other two are just temporary things you can
> actually see through. I have found from trying to take naps down there
> that you can hear everything from upstairs in addition to all the stuff
> downstairs (water heater, AC/furnace, water softener, dehumidifier,
> hepa filter, etc).
> As is probably assumed by the statements of me being just out of
> college and only living at home again for probably a year, that I am on
> a very low budget.

> Oh, I have a 100' 24x4 snake if that matters for control room
> stuff.
>
> One more thing. I'll probably be recording mainly jazz groups, so
> drums will be present. I also expect to at some point get some rock
> bands and stuff in there if things go well (wow, I never thought I'd
> say that).

I'd suggest that you take a different approach. Don't try to do the
acoustic treatment thing - you'll never make it effective without
spending much more money than you have or think you'd like to spend.

Set up a workable mixing space - a desk, a computer, some near field
monitors, good light and ventiliation so you can spend a reasonable
amount of time there. Put your money into some transport cases and buy
a reliable van or decent sized car. Put in a workbench, and build some
storage space. Record on location. That's often the best way to record
jazz groups and you can pick up some money recording rock bands at
gigs, too. Set yourself up so that you can record multitrack at the
gig, then mix when you get home.

Use the workshop to learn your gear, make all the custom cables and
little boxes that you'll need, and fix stuff that breaks. Develop your
real-time working and mixing skills. Make a few more bucks than you
spend. Build your reputation and your "portfolio."

When you're ready to move out, think about going to work for a studio
rather than building your own. Or maybe you'll impress someone who
will finance your own studio. Whatever you do, don't start out with a
little money. You'll never have enough when you need it.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 1:21:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Steve,

> The area I have to work with is about 16' x 21' <

I can't help you with AC and related issues, but that space is perfect for
an all-in-one room. This article from EQ magazine shows complete plans for a
studio in a room that size:

www.realtraps.com/art_studio.htm

--Ethan
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 1:37:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

If you want to isolate a kick drum in a basement with a low ceiling
from the rest of the house, you're pretty much SOL. I went through the
same process a while ago, and no matter how much money you decide to
spend, nobody will guarantee you total isolation from the rest of the
house. If you DI the bass guitar and use an electronic kick drum to
trigger some good quality wav files, then you have eliminated the worst
of it. I am looking at getting a Roland TD-20 drum kit and the Drum Kit
from Hell samples (80 Gigabites worth) for that reason. Go to the
Roland web site and look at the NAMM video samples of the TD-20 kit.
You'll be amazed at how well it plays and looks. My Evil Twins seem to
do a good DI job for bass. YMMV.

Gord
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 1:40:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>There are actually quite a lot of jobs in audio that don't have to do
with music. <

Please list some examples, if you would...
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 2:05:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks so far guys. Just some comments on the comments I've gotten:

"I wouldn't recommend playing in a band because that's a
whole separate money pit. "
- too late, I play (and own) multiple saxes, drums, bass, guitar,
clarinet, flute, etc.

"Get employment on the merits of your degree. "
- Sorry, my degree is in Jazz Saxophone. That guarantees me about as
much work as owning a small mixer and a casette deck.

As for the plans for that room, thanks for whoever put down the link.
The only issue is that once I move out the room still needs to look
nice and stuff so my parents can use it for whatever they want, so the
no-parallel-walls thing might not be an option unless they are easily
removed.

When building walls, how do you put in the sound insulation? I put
some of the pink stuff up on the walls at my current location with a
sheet over it and it seemed like it really cut down the mids and highs.
Would I use this or Sheetrock or whatever it's called?

I don't really choose to do just jazz groups, but since I'm plugged in
in that community, that's the work that comes my way, and I have no
problem with it. Hopefully if my name gets out there more for
recording I will get more random groups like rock groups and celtic
death metal woodwind quartets and stuff.
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 5:30:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

wedgeland <brad.ulreich@gmail.com> wrote:
>>There are actually quite a lot of jobs in audio that don't have to do
>with music. <
>
>Please list some examples, if you would...

Lots of broadcast engineering work... dialogue editing.... sound effects
editing and management... some kinds of maintenance enginering and design
work...

It takes a lot of folks to do the sound for a typical football game, and
the music there is just an afterthought....
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
July 27, 2005 9:29:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

To achieve any kind of isolation you have to float the room. If you think
you can do this for a few thousand dollars you are misinformed. There are
books out about building a recording studio. I suggest at the least that you
buy a few before doing anything. Better would be to find someone in your
area who has built a place
--Lou Gimenez
The Music Lab
2" 24track w all the Goodies
www.musiclabnyc.com



> From: "elecbanana" <sseifried@fuse.net>
> Organization: http://groups.google.com
> Newsgroups: rec.audio.pro
> Date: 27 Jul 2005 10:05:02 -0700
> Subject: Re: Finishing my basement as a studio
>
> Thanks so far guys. Just some comments on the comments I've gotten:
>
> "I wouldn't recommend playing in a band because that's a
> whole separate money pit. "
> - too late, I play (and own) multiple saxes, drums, bass, guitar,
> clarinet, flute, etc.
>
> "Get employment on the merits of your degree. "
> - Sorry, my degree is in Jazz Saxophone. That guarantees me about as
> much work as owning a small mixer and a casette deck.
>
> As for the plans for that room, thanks for whoever put down the link.
> The only issue is that once I move out the room still needs to look
> nice and stuff so my parents can use it for whatever they want, so the
> no-parallel-walls thing might not be an option unless they are easily
> removed.
>
> When building walls, how do you put in the sound insulation? I put
> some of the pink stuff up on the walls at my current location with a
> sheet over it and it seemed like it really cut down the mids and highs.
> Would I use this or Sheetrock or whatever it's called?
>
> I don't really choose to do just jazz groups, but since I'm plugged in
> in that community, that's the work that comes my way, and I have no
> problem with it. Hopefully if my name gets out there more for
> recording I will get more random groups like rock groups and celtic
> death metal woodwind quartets and stuff.
>
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 12:58:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1122482459.842501.24900@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com> brad.ulreich@gmail.com writes:

> >There are actually quite a lot of jobs in audio that don't have to do
> with music. <
>
> Please list some examples, if you would...

Maintenance and troubleshooting. Everybody needs it. The trick is to
get the people who need it most to pay you for it. I haven't found
that secret yet.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 1:14:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

A friend of mine started doing this -- after getting a pro to design the
necessary modifications -- and ran out of resources (mostly energy?)
before he finished the project. It _started_ with replacing the ground
floor supporting joists with steel C-beams so he could gain some extra
inches in order to hang acoustically-isolated suspended ceiling. The
next step was supposed to be to build booth enclosure walls with offset
studs (so the studs didn't couple sound through from one side to the
other) and fill them with sand to prevent air coupling. I don't have
details on what was to be done with the floors, but presumably something
suitable was to be floated over the poured concrete. Room shapes were
designed specifically for their acoustical properties.

I think he might actually have been able to pull it off for not too many
thousands of dollars worth of materials... at heavy investment of sweat
equity, his and his friends. (I helped with the floor-joist replacement
process. It was... interesting. Drill C-beam, clamp to joist, drill
joist, bolt to joist, cut away all of joist below C-beam, repeat ad
nauseam. His living room floor was rather oddly springy until things
settled and all the forces had been transferred to the new
reinforcement. NOT something to attempt without advice of an engineer
who can guarantee that it'll still meet building codes.)
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 4:54:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Listen to Ethan
Do This:
http://www.johnlsayers.com/

On 7/27/05 2:03 AM, in article
1122444200.217361.118320@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com, "elecbanana"
<sseifried@fuse.net> wrote:

> Greetings!
>
> I am a college student just finishing up my last year. I have a
> small studio set up at my rental house at UC that works pretty well for
> me. It's an old house, so it's built solid. We put some stuff on the
> walls, put the control room upstairs and it has worked well. Now the
> problem is that at the end of August my lease is up and I'm going to be
> moving back home for a year or so (cue the mama's boy jokes). I really
> think recording is a possible career for me so I have to have a studio
> set up somewhere.
> My parent's house has a pretty decent basement that is unfinished
> and for the most part not used for anything. The area I have to work
> with is about 16' x 21'. Since I'm not there I can't tell you the
> height of the ceiling, but it's probably around 8' or so. Two current
> walls are concrete and the other two are just temporary things you can
> actually see through. I have found from trying to take naps down there
> that you can hear everything from upstairs in addition to all the stuff
> downstairs (water heater, AC/furnace, water softener, dehumidifier,
> hepa filter, etc).
> As is probably assumed by the statements of me being just out of
> college and only living at home again for probably a year, that I am on
> a very low budget. There is already some really nice, thick carpet
> down there thanks to some insurance money.
> I guess the requirements for this thing would be as follows:
> 1. Isolation from upstairs (in both directions)
> 2. Isolation from the rest of the basement
> 3. Isolation from the big loud AC unit that is right outside the
> windows from the room
> 4. A decent sound for recording (duh)
> - I'm used to a dead, no-room, sound, so I don't have a problem
> with having that again
> 5. Somehow (and I know I'll get flack for this) have a control
> room-type thing in this area, whether isolated or I'll just have to be
> quiet.
> 6. Cheap and easy, 'cause I'll most likely be doing this all by myself.
>
> Oh, I have a 100' 24x4 snake if that matters for control room
> stuff.
>
> One more thing. I'll probably be recording mainly jazz groups, so
> drums will be present. I also expect to at some point get some rock
> bands and stuff in there if things go well (wow, I never thought I'd
> say that).
>
> Thank you for reading this whole thing and thank you in advance for any
> and all advice you can give me.
>
> -Steve
>
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 6:40:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 27 Jul 2005 20:58:34 -0400, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers)
wrote:

>> Please list some examples, if you would...
>
>Maintenance and troubleshooting. Everybody needs it. The trick is to
>get the people who need it most to pay you for it. I haven't found
>that secret yet.

My new day job is something like this in the consumer world.
After thirty years doing and supervising bench repairs, I'd
burnt out and retired. The new gig is traveling to the customer's
place, sorting out their audio/video problems, and solving them.

It's tremendously satisfying, reasonably but not impossibly
challenging, and my employer bills my time at $65 per hour.
Here in the sticks, that's real money, but cheaper than a plumber.

Maybe the proliferation of home studios is generating a similar
customer base, folks who have acquired enough technology that
it's overwhelming to connect and configure, and who could pay
a reasonable price to someone who could help them make things
happen.

And for the home studio market, you'd have the tremendous advantage
of being able to ask questions here at r.a.p. Nobody knows everything.

Good fortune,

Chris Hornbeck
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 12:08:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

wedgeland wrote:
> >There are actually quite a lot of jobs in audio that don't have to do
> with music. <
>
> Please list some examples, if you would...

Well, I work for in a department of a public university as the audio
specialist. My department digitizes a great deal of records for
internet databases. One of our biggest projects can be found here
http://www.aodl.org as well as our best practices.

Besides archival work, there's a lot of work in TV, even on a local
level; radio obviously; i know some people who decent money recording
radio commercials.
Then there's live sound: it's not limited to bands in clubs; think
conferences, churches, political rallies, any kind of gathering where
there will be speakers.
Use your creativity, and talk to people about what they might need that
you could do. There is a lot out there.
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 1:25:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <0vfge1dfhsj92hvont6mqq171jsse4jjm8@4ax.com> chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net writes:

> After thirty years doing and supervising bench repairs, I'd
> burnt out and retired. The new gig is traveling to the customer's
> place, sorting out their audio/video problems, and solving them.
>
> It's tremendously satisfying, reasonably but not impossibly
> challenging, and my employer bills my time at $65 per hour.
> Here in the sticks, that's real money, but cheaper than a plumber.
>
> Maybe the proliferation of home studios is generating a similar
> customer base, folks who have acquired enough technology that
> it's overwhelming to connect and configure, and who could pay
> a reasonable price to someone who could help them make things
> happen.

That's what I was hoping, too. But instead of paying me a couple of
hundred bucks to come over and tell them what they needed to spend a
couple of hundredm more bucks on, they post something on rec.audio.pro
and get 20 different answers, but they like "learning."


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 1:43:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Steve,

> the no-parallel-walls thing might not be an option unless they are easily
removed. <

You don't have to angle the walls. I mostly meant to use the rest of the
info in that article as a guideline. There are many other articles there too
you will benefit from reading.

--Ethan
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 7:54:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1122563285.945376.156750@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com> k.revitte@gmail.com writes:

> Well, I work for in a department of a public university as the audio
> specialist. My department digitizes a great deal of records for
> internet databases. One of our biggest projects can be found here
> http://www.aodl.org as well as our best practices.

Yeah, but those jobs don't get drugs and groupies.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 11:13:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks for the link! I didn't even think about making Helmholtz
(spelling?) resonators and stuff. However, the "plans" don't give many
details and actually not even enough to build one of those things
(various acoustic treatments and the rooms in general). Is there
another place that took these designs on and gave them the necessary
specs to actually be made? Perhaps I just didn't find it yet on the
site.
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 2:46:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Steve,

> Is there another place that took these designs on and gave them the
necessary specs to actually be made? <

See my Acoustics FAQ:

www.ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html

--Ethan
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 2:23:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks, It'll take me a while to get to everything on that site, but it
looks very helpful. Thasnks.
!