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questions to recording engineers!!! Thank you!!!

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Anonymous
July 27, 2005 7:19:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hey folks,
It's been almost 7 months since I've started looking for a runner
position in major studios in LA. However, NO LUCK!!!
Here is something about me.
I graduated with a BS degree in electrical engineering(Dec., 2004) and
concentration in signal processing from a top 15 engineering school in
the nation. I've done some projects on audio signals back in college.
In addition, I also have been an avid piano player since the age of
five. I play most of the classical masterpieces, and composed a few
pieces in the past years as well.
All I want to do is to start from the beginning in a recording
studio(runner). I dont even require salary if I work after 6pm til
whenever since I am currenly employed in an engineering firm.
Can anyone give me some tips or advices? I've been trying so hard for
the past few months. How come no studio wants to hire a free labor??? I
really dont understand this.
BTW, I have an essential knowledge in microphones and analog/digital
recorders.

Please help!!!

Thank you very much.
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 10:42:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1122502793.375381.112040@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> omdrazzi@gmail.com writes:

> I graduated with a BS degree in electrical engineering(Dec., 2004) and
> concentration in signal processing from a top 15 engineering school in
> the nation.

That doesn't mean too much to a studio without knowing more. Can you
fix a mic preamp or align a tape deck or adjust a Dolby noise
reduction system?

> In addition, I also have been an avid piano player since the age of
> five. I play most of the classical masterpieces, and composed a few
> pieces in the past years as well.

That probably means that you can read music and follow a score. That's
a good asset to a studio when they're doing commercial work with
string sections, but most of that work occurs during daylight hours.
If you can't come in to work until 6 PM because of your day job, all
those players are home watching TV, playing with the dog, and eating
dinner. It's only the rock bands that work at night.

When you're ready to work from 10 AM until 1 AM, that's the time to
start looking for a job, and you should ask for some pay. This
business of working for free just doesn't happen in the real world
unless you have a friend in the business - or you build your own
studio, in which you'll be essentially working for free for several
years until you build up a reputation.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 2:37:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

You've got a BSEE and a job in the field-- congratulations. That's the
real stuff right there, in my opinion.
I have 3 semesters left on mine.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 28, 2005 6:35:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Omdrazzi wrote:
> Hey folks,
> It's been almost 7 months since I've started looking for a runner
> position in major studios in LA. However, NO LUCK!!!
> Here is something about me.
> I graduated with a BS degree in electrical engineering(Dec., 2004) and
> concentration in signal processing from a top 15 engineering school in
> the nation. I've done some projects on audio signals back in college.
> In addition, I also have been an avid piano player since the age of
> five. I play most of the classical masterpieces, and composed a few
> pieces in the past years as well.
> All I want to do is to start from the beginning in a recording
> studio(runner). I dont even require salary if I work after 6pm til
> whenever since I am currenly employed in an engineering firm.
> Can anyone give me some tips or advices? I've been trying so hard for
> the past few months. How come no studio wants to hire a free labor??? I
> really dont understand this.
> BTW, I have an essential knowledge in microphones and analog/digital
> recorders.
>
Sounds pretty familiar although I didn't have an engineering degree
(instead, I had a BA in music performance and a certificate of advanced
studies in recording arts) and I didn't have a day job. This was 15
years ago and I wouldn't take a runner position without pay. Most
studios at that time said something to the effect of "you work for free
for six weeks until we decide whether or not we like you, then if
you're still here we put you on for $5 an hour". I was able to find a
runner position at once place for $5 right away so I took it. I quit a
few days later. Then I was lucky enough to get a job paying $10 an hour
working as a tech, building a studio.

First, I'd say in many ways you're overqualified and you'll know more
about the technology and systems than the people you work for. Being a
runner is a really menial job. And these guys probably see that. I.e.
you have an engineering background but will be parking cars, cleaning
toilets and making coffee. Most employers don't go for that.

I'd suggest that you try to go the maitenence engineer route. There's
more opportunities, and you'll get in the studios faster. And you'll be
using at least some of your actual skills.

Then, just like being a runner or a 2nd, you might get a bit of studio
time here or there when nothing is booked, and you can also get to know
the engineers, maybe helping out when the opportunities arise.

Karl Winkler
Lectrosonics, Inc.
http://www.lectrosonics.com
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 12:48:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

-----------
> Hey folks,
> It's been almost 7 months since I've started looking for a runner
> position in major studios in LA. However, NO LUCK!!!
> Here is something about me.
> I graduated with a BS degree in electrical engineering(Dec., 2004) and
> concentration in signal processing from a top 15 engineering school in
> the nation. I've done some projects on audio signals back in college.
> In addition, I also have been an avid piano player since the age of
> five. I play most of the classical masterpieces, and composed a few
> pieces in the past years as well.
> All I want to do is to start from the beginning in a recording
> studio(runner). I dont even require salary if I work after 6pm til
> whenever since I am currenly employed in an engineering firm.

Interesting... I'll be in the exact same boat 10 months from now, piano and
all (well jazz in my case). Let me know how it works out for you.
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 1:01:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Omdrazzi" <omdrazzi@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1122502793.375381.112040@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com
> Hey folks,
> It's been almost 7 months since I've started looking for
> a runner position in major studios in LA. However, NO
> LUCK!!!

> Here is something about me.
> I graduated with a BS degree in electrical
> engineering(Dec., 2004) and concentration in signal
> processing from a top 15 engineering school in the
> nation. I've done some projects on audio signals back in
> college. In addition, I also have been an avid piano
> player since the age of five. I play most of the
> classical masterpieces, and composed a few pieces in the
> past years as well.

> All I want to do is to start from the beginning in a
> recording studio(runner). I dont even require salary if I
> work after 6pm til whenever since I am currenly employed
> in an engineering firm.

> Can anyone give me some tips or advices? I've been trying
> so hard for the past few months. How come no studio wants
> to hire a free labor???

>I really dont understand this.
> BTW, I have an essential knowledge in microphones and
> analog/digital recorders.

Two words: play dumb.

Three basic pieces of advice:

Hide your resume.

Dress down.

Talk stupid.

But do it so well that nobody knows that it is in essence an
act. If you want to prepare well for this adventure,
consider taking some acting classes.

You've probably already poisoned the well where you are so
badly that you might need to change your name and
appearance.

You're vastly overqualified in terms of basic technology and
obviously nowhere when it comes to humility and practical
experience.

The people you are asking for jobs are at once scared to
death of your technical background and awed by, but
disdainful of your cultural background. It's all irrelevant
to their day-to-day work and lives.

It's like the CFO of Microsoft wants to hire on as a bank
teller. Only maybe a little worse.
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 3:11:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Omdrazzi wrote:
> Hey folks,
> It's been almost 7 months since I've started looking for a runner
> position in major studios in LA. However, NO LUCK!!!
> Here is something about me.
> I graduated with a BS degree in electrical engineering(Dec., 2004) and
> concentration in signal processing from a top 15 engineering school in
> the nation. I've done some projects on audio signals back in college.
> In addition, I also have been an avid piano player since the age of
> five. I play most of the classical masterpieces, and composed a few
> pieces in the past years as well.
> All I want to do is to start from the beginning in a recording
> studio(runner). I dont even require salary if I work after 6pm til
> whenever since I am currenly employed in an engineering firm.
> Can anyone give me some tips or advices? I've been trying so hard for
> the past few months. How come no studio wants to hire a free labor??? I
> really dont understand this.
> BTW, I have an essential knowledge in microphones and analog/digital
> recorders.

Karl Winkler's right. But if you really want a job as a runner in
a studio, not for any money but just for tremendous respect and
admiration intrinsic to such a position, you might check out
craigslist.com from time to time.

But really you are way too overqualified to be a runner, minimum
you should looking for a job as an assistant who can help out with
tech/wiring etc. In that position you will still get plenty of
opportunity to make people coffee and order food, and the studio
manager will think they are getting a great deal on getting maintanance
type work done cheap. Just don't mention your EE except in the context
of doing maintanance work too.

Will Miho
NY Music and TV Audio Guy
"The large print giveth and the small print taketh away..." Tom Waits
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 9:46:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> I graduated with a BS degree

Nah, you didn't, Phil Allison did though...
Anonymous
July 29, 2005 9:46:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"John T" <hotflashesnil@hotmail.com> wrote in message...

> > I graduated with a BS degree

> Nah, you didn't, Phil Allison did though...


Phil's is a very different definition of "B.S."

DM
Anonymous
July 30, 2005 3:23:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I sent this before but it never showed up ( at least on my news server. )
************************************************************

I don't know if it will work but how about making some flyers and cards
advertising your FREE food and drink ( and parts, like strings, sticks,
hears batteries, etc ) delivery service for pro recording studios. They
call you and tell you what they want, you pick it up and deliver and then
they pay you for what it cost you, with no markup. ( you eat the gas and
your time )

Obviously you can't do this for free forever and you could be out some money
if someone shafts you but it could be a way to meet people and hopefully be
in the right place at the right time.

Difference between this and being a runner for a single studio is that a
studio doesn't have to commit to your services, anyone just calls when they
need you. Could be fun.

Here's some add copy for you :

Is your session grinding to a halt? Get it back on track with GAS!
Gopher Angel Service
Let me help you do what I wish I was doing!

If you are efficient, polite, get things right and are able to competently
coordinate multiple requests from different studios in the same evening I'd
think somebody would want to hire you after a while for a paying position.

Best of luck too you! ;-)

John L Rice
Drummer@ImJohn.com

"Omdrazzi" <omdrazzi@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1122502793.375381.112040@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Hey folks,
> It's been almost 7 months since I've started looking for a runner
> position in major studios in LA. However, NO LUCK!!!
> Here is something about me.
> I graduated with a BS degree in electrical engineering(Dec., 2004) and
> concentration in signal processing from a top 15 engineering school in
> the nation. I've done some projects on audio signals back in college.
> In addition, I also have been an avid piano player since the age of
> five. I play most of the classical masterpieces, and composed a few
> pieces in the past years as well.
> All I want to do is to start from the beginning in a recording
> studio(runner). I dont even require salary if I work after 6pm til
> whenever since I am currenly employed in an engineering firm.
> Can anyone give me some tips or advices? I've been trying so hard for
> the past few months. How come no studio wants to hire a free labor??? I
> really dont understand this.
> BTW, I have an essential knowledge in microphones and analog/digital
> recorders.
>
> Please help!!!
>
> Thank you very much.
>
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 1:54:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Omdrazzi wrote:

> Hey folks,
> It's been almost 7 months since I've started looking for a runner
> position in major studios in LA. However, NO LUCK!!!
> Here is something about me.
> I graduated with a BS degree in electrical engineering(Dec., 2004) and
> concentration in signal processing from a top 15 engineering school in
> the nation. I've done some projects on audio signals back in college.
> In addition, I also have been an avid piano player since the age of
> five. I play most of the classical masterpieces, and composed a few
> pieces in the past years as well.
> All I want to do is to start from the beginning in a recording
> studio(runner). I dont even require salary if I work after 6pm til
> whenever since I am currenly employed in an engineering firm.
> Can anyone give me some tips or advices? I've been trying so hard for
> the past few months. How come no studio wants to hire a free labor??? I
> really dont understand this.
> BTW, I have an essential knowledge in microphones and analog/digital
> recorders.

If you simply wanted to work in a studio why did you waste your time
getting a degree in electrical engineering ? You're way *over qualified* .
That alone may put ppl off.

Graham
Anonymous
July 31, 2005 11:29:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pooh Bear wrote:

> If you simply wanted to work in a studio why did you waste your time
> getting a degree in electrical engineering ? You're way *over qualified* .
> That alone may put ppl off.

Some people like to _really_ understand what's going on when
electrons are moved about.

I agree, though, that it may put people off in that many
prospective employers could expect you to think you know
everything even though you know that it is actually quite
compartmented. It might be best to keep that background to
yourself and come from it, when appropriate, rather than be
about it.


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
August 1, 2005 4:39:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <dck1f50kop@enews4.newsguy.com>, Bob Cain
<arcane@arcanemethods.com> wrote:

> > If you simply wanted to work in a studio why did you waste your time
> > getting a degree in electrical engineering ? You're way *over qualified* .
> > That alone may put ppl off.
>
> Some people like to _really_ understand what's going on when
> electrons are moved about.
>
> I agree, though, that it may put people off in that many
> prospective employers could expect you to think you know
> everything even though you know that it is actually quite
> compartmented. It might be best to keep that background to
> yourself and come from it, when appropriate, rather than be
> about it.
>
>
> Bob



I get people trying to work in my place all the time. I wouldn't keep
it a secret. But I would be clear to communicate that you want to enter
on the ground floor and work.

I'd also suggest, as someone else mentioned, that your best route
inside a real studio may be with your tech skills. Studio owners always
have an ear out for guys who can fix things.

This is a tremendous asset. If in fact you do have sodering skills and
can read a schematic, then take *advantage* of this rather than hide
it. An assistant who can also fix stuff is pretty good stuff. Trust me,
if you get in the door, they will take advantage of it. Cuz we like it
or not, in a busy studio stuff always breaks. And sooner or later it's
gotta get fixed.

Best of luck!





David Correia
Celebration Sound
Warren, Rhode Island

CelebrationSound@aol.com
www.CelebrationSound.com
!