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How to change default boot options

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  • Default
  • Boot
Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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May 23, 2002 7:49:20 AM

I'm tired of having to reboot my computer because I forget to wait (patiently) for the LILO boot loader. I mainly use Windows, so I want it set as the default boot operating system. I tried changing:

default=linux
to
default=windows

in the /etc/lilo.conf file, but it still selects Linux by default. What am I doing wrong?

thanks!

More about : change default boot options

May 23, 2002 10:20:20 AM

Did you run `lilo` after making the change in /etc/lilo.conf? You have to run it to update the boot sector and implement the changes you made in the file. You can set the timeout to something lower if you want as well.

<i>I used to have a girl, but then I got my CS degree...</i>
May 23, 2002 5:11:16 PM

Ummm...o.k. I am an OFFICIAL moron. Yeah, I should have "man lilo" before posting because it was right there! I'm not used to using man yet I guess. Thanks for your help, it worked!

BTW, what is the best way to master Linux. I mean, how can I learn it so well that I can write at least simple drivers and programs? I feel that Mandrake does so much for you that I didn't really learn it. How do I pick the Linux brain?
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May 24, 2002 10:05:02 AM

Don't be too hard on yourself... 'twas a fair mistake. GRUB, the other main Linux bootloader *doesn't* need to be rerun... 50/50 chance I s'pose.

Quote:
How do I pick the Linux brain?

Mostly by reading a lot, and using it a lot. But it's a bit of a step between using Linux and coding for it. Check out the HOWTOs and docs at www.linuxdoc.org. Most of the apps have their own website, mailing lists, newsgroups where you can find information (if man or info don't tell you enough).

As for simple drivers and programs, you really need C. You can code apps in pretty much any language (Perl, Python, Shell Scripts, Java, C++, Tk, etc) but most of the core Linux application code out there is C. Any drivers probably need to be in C, if they interact with the kernel. Because the source code is available, you can take a look at someone elses work and figure out how they did it, which helps a lot sometimes.


<i>I used to have a girl, but then I got my CS degree...</i>
May 24, 2002 4:52:18 PM

I know C fairly well. I had to write some pretty tough code for my thesis. Although, I would say that I'm only average because I don't have the formal training in C that you have (Computer Science or CEG). I guess looking at other peoples code would be a great way to begin learning. Thanks for the advice! Linux is too cool!
!