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Synching Audio and Video: Newby Music Promo Production

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Anonymous
August 2, 2005 2:14:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hi all,

I'm trying to make a music promo vid (not an artsy music video or
anything) look as professionally as I can, doing it pretty much by
myself.

I'm real serious about trying to do it right, and I just spent a good 4
hours reading over all posts with the word "sync," so I have learned
some stuff, but I'm still in the dark about a lot.

SHORT VERSION:
Using separate digital audio (RME Fireface (firewire) + Sonar4) and 2
separate videos from different cameras, recording 10 minute
performances (one take), will I encounter drift? Can I get around it
and still make a professional looking (at least synched) promo vid?
What steps should I take in the recording and editing process?

And for those of you kind enough to want to know more, the
FULL VERSION:
My plan is to record myself at various open mics to get the illusion of
multiple venues. I just invested A LOT (for me, at least) of money
into a great, brand new firewire sound interface, the RME Fireface 800.
I have a laptop running SONAR 4 Producer Edition. The rest of
equipment, I'm desparately borrowing.

I plan to have 2 cameras (I can call this AB, right?) filming me live,
one doing close-ups, another one filming wider shots. These will not
be amazing cameras, just mid-range miniDV ones, like a Canon ZR200 --
additionally, they'll almost definitely be different models... I'm
worried that will look bad cutting between the 2, and pose synching
problems? For audio, I'll probably be going out of the PA (a Mackie
808s) inserts at line level and into the Fireface and onto SONAR. Or I
could go into the fireface first, not sure yet (although, since I'll be
bumming around open mics, I'll need to be as non-intrusive as possible,
thus probably out of the PA / Mixer). Additionally, I'll have the 2
scratch tracks from the cameras' mics.

Each shoot will be about 10 minutes long: cameramen, laptop recorder
all hit record and I do my thing. My big concern is syncing everything
in post.

Question 1.) People keep mentioning a clapboard -- I will not have this
luxury in a public place with limited "crew," I suppose I could use a
muffled strum before tunes as an aural/visual marker? (heh, I usually
end up doing that anyway : ).

Question 2.) I can't afford to buy a real camera that could interface
with the crazy genclock device I'm also unable to afford, so, with
these 10 minute takes, will I end up with a lot of "drift" trying to
match up the fireface recorded tracks with the 2 (count em, 2) video
tracks (from different cameras, no less)? Is drift reduced if you take
smaller, individual takes (for instance, in between songs)?

Question 3.) I hear I should record the audio at 48kHz to match the
video? -- I don't really understand this btw, shouldn't they occupy
the same temporal duration, regardless of the sound's bit depth /
resolution? I shouldn't take advantage of my 192kHz capabilities?

Question 4.) This one has to do with the overall process;i.e. am I
going about it right? My plan is to go to these venues, get my audio
and visual shots. So now I enter post. In looking at the daunting
task of editing together 2 audio and 2 video tracks (I'm largely a
newb... I've done some editing with iMovie and even less with Premiere
for fun, but nothing this sound intensive), my first concern is that,
for each "shoot," the 2 video tracks and the audio all synch up. So, I
assume first I should mix my multi track audio to something I'm happy
with, then export it? Next, I'd move to Premiere 7 with my AB camera
set up, and do my best to synch the two video tracks (after I capture
each through firewire), and hope to god the two videos don't drift (if
they did, I wouldn't even know how to address the problem). Assuming I
got the 2 video tracks to line up perfectly at the head, now I drop in
my sound, line that up, and observe the horrible drift I'm
nightmarishly envisioning running into. To fix that, is my only option
to try and time stretch my audio to fit the video, or is there a more
elegant way to try and account for this? Now with everything in line,
I can make my cuts and hopefully not overdo it with silly wipes and
Algerian font titles : )

Whew. I realize that was a lot. I'm sorry, I wanted to be as detailed
as possible so people could give me a good answer. Thank you so much
in advance for any help!!!!

-johnny
www.johnnymarnell.com
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 4:18:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

John,

I haven't done much in this area but I know some people who have, so
I'll stick to what I know first hand.

In composing for movies, basically the video is fixed and the music has

to adapt to the video. In your case, the audio is fixed, so the video
should be
made to adapt to the audio.

Those bands on MTV don't time-stretch their audio, but their videos
switch view once a second for a reason ;) 

On another note, you might not be able to buy a pro cam but maybe
renting one is an option.

Okay so this wasn't much, hopefully it gave a few ideas anyway :)  Good
luck!
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 11:15:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Since you're doing this without sync, you can save yourself a lot of
headaches and record your audio track beforehand. Then, when you're
shooting your video, play back your pre-recorded audio track and simply
play along with it. Solves any timing to video discrepancies that may
crop up between varous video segments.

As was mentioned in a post above - your audio needs to be fixed and you
then edit video to fit the audio track. Good luck.
Related resources
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 12:58:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<johnmarnell@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Question 1.) People keep mentioning a clapboard -- I will not have
> this luxury in a public place with limited "crew," I suppose I could
> use a muffled strum before tunes as an aural/visual marker? (heh, I
> usually end up doing that anyway : ).

Ideally you want something really short and precise. A clapper is ideal
because the sound can easily be matched to a very obvious visual cue. A
strum may be too long and be hard to match exactly. Try hitting your
mic stand with a drumstick instead! <g>



> Question 2.) I can't afford to buy a real camera that could interface
> with the crazy genclock device I'm also unable to afford, so, with
> these 10 minute takes, will I end up with a lot of "drift" trying to
> match up the fireface recorded tracks with the 2 (count em, 2) video
> tracks (from different cameras, no less)?

Yeah, they might drift a bit, but that's less of a concern with digital
gear than it was with analog. Chances are really good that it will all
line up fine, so I wouldn't worry about it too much if you're using DV
camcorders.



> Question 3.) I hear I should record the audio at 48kHz to match the
> video? -- I don't really understand this btw, shouldn't they occupy
> the same temporal duration, regardless of the sound's bit depth /
> resolution? I shouldn't take advantage of my 192kHz capabilities?

You're right. It doesn't matter what sample rate you use to multitrack.
Your finished mix should probably wind up at 48K though, if for no other
reason than it's the standard for video, and anything you import into
your editor will be sample-rate converted to 48 anyway.

Some of us seriously question the value of ever bothering with higher
sample rates at all, but that's another issue for another discussion.
If you feel that there's some benefit to recording up to frequencies
only young bats can hear, go ahead.



> I assume first I should mix my multi track audio to something I'm
> happy with, then export it? Next, I'd move to Premiere 7 with my AB
> camera set up, and do my best to synch the two video tracks (after I
> capture each through firewire), and hope to god the two videos don't
> drift (if they did, I wouldn't even know how to address the
> problem). Assuming I got the 2 video tracks to line up perfectly at
> the head, now I drop in my sound, line that up, and observe the
> horrible drift I'm nightmarishly envisioning running into. To fix
> that, is my only option to try and time stretch my audio to fit the
> video, or is there a more elegant way to try and account for this?

If there are timing issues (and there may not be), correct them with
picture edits, NOT time stretching.

For example, let's say that at some point the audio begins leading the
video enough to be noticeable. That is, you hear the note before you
see the string being plucked. Let's say it's off by three frames. Cut
to the other camera, but slide that video track back three frames. The
viewer will never notice that you've just moved back in time ever so
slightly, and sound and picture will be back in sync. Or go back and
make "adjustment edits" of one frame each at two earlier spots. The
point is to use picture cuts as opportunities to realign.

If your shooters are good, they'll get you some cut-aways -- shots of
just your face, or wideshots of the stage, or pans across the
audience -- stuff that can be inserted at ANY point in the performance,
that you can't tell whether it happened at just that moment or ten
minutes earlier (instrumental close-ups are obviously NOT well suited
for this purpose! <g>). You can use cut-aways to cover time-shift edits
(like what we discussed above), camera blunders, or just to add some
spice here and there. The audience stuff can be shot during someone
else's performance so it isn't tying up a camera while you're on.

--
"It CAN'T be too loud... some of the red lights aren't even on yet!"
- Lorin David Schultz
in the control room
making even bad news sound good

(Remove spamblock to reply)
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 3:38:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>> Since you're doing this without sync, you can save yourself a lot of
>> headaches and record your audio track beforehand.  Then, when you're
>> shooting your video, play back your pre-recorded audio track and simply
>> play along with it.   Solves any timing to video discrepancies that may
>> crop up between varous video segments.

>I don't see that could help. He is recording audio and video at the same
>time, and wants to combine the audio and vido in sync.

Actually, the suggestion is to NOT play it live. The problem is in
playing at several different locations he will have to be immaculate in
keeping the tempo consistent
from performance to performance if he wants to intercut from the video
of one performance to another.

Having the audio track as the constant will give him a chance to make
each performance agree tempo-wise. Otherwise, yes, you CAN do it the
hard way and have each performance 'wild', but you'll bust your ass
trying to get some of the shots to line up so that the edits look
right.

If it absolutely MUST be 'played and captured live' then please
disregard. This is a suggestion for an alternate solution. The whole
premise of his video is to create an illusion anyway. Just an easier
way to go about it where you control what you can of the variables.

As i said in the original post, if you want to save yoursef a lot of
headaches...
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 4:51:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1122959677.268348.228240@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> johnmarnell@gmail.com writes:

> Using separate digital audio (RME Fireface (firewire) + Sonar4) and 2
> separate videos from different cameras, recording 10 minute
> performances (one take), will I encounter drift? Can I get around it
> and still make a professional looking (at least synched) promo vid?
> What steps should I take in the recording and editing process?

With no synchronization (this is called "wild sync") you will
certainly have some drift. The way to deal with it for your
production, assuming it's a typical music video, is to let the music
be your time reference, and cut the video so that you don't notice
when things go out of sync.

One simple concept is to put a close-up of your face or your picking
hand at the beginning of an important phrase and adjust the picture so
that it's in sync with the music. It will stay in sync for at least a
line or two, but don't hold it any longer. At an appropriate emotional
point, switch to another shot and get that in sync as closely as you
can.

Any modern computer-based video editing software will be able to
handle the transition between shots without rolling or tearing, so
what you need to do is get the parts in sync that will be obvious if
it gets out of sync. And make your transitions in sync with musical
events - on the beat, when the chorus comes in, when a verse starts,
when the solo starts, and so on, and don't dwell on a shot too long.
It's a music video, not one on guitar instruction or lip reading.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 6:46:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 1 Aug 2005 22:14:37 -0700, <johnmarnell@gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I'm trying to make a music promo vid (not an artsy music video or
> anything) look as professionally as I can, doing it pretty much by
> myself.
>
I'm no expert but I've just spent a little time on a project like yours
trying all the cheap video software that I could find.
>
> Question 1.) People keep mentioning a clapboard -- I will not have this
> luxury in a public place with limited "crew," I suppose I could use a
> muffled strum before tunes as an aural/visual marker? (heh, I usually
> end up doing that anyway : ).
>
Being a sound person I prefer to match things up using the soundtracks
from the different cameras. This requires at least some percussiveness to
the music though. I'll pan the audio from the two sources that I'm trying
to match up to opposite sides and then try to find the best match.

>
> Question 3.) I hear I should record the audio at 48kHz to match the
> video? -- I don't really understand this btw, shouldn't they occupy
> the same temporal duration, regardless of the sound's bit depth /
> resolution? I shouldn't take advantage of my 192kHz capabilities?
>
By all means record at a higher rate if you want to but remember that
you'll take up lots of extra disc space and very few people will be able
to hear it at full rate. Standard DVD video can handle up to 96kHz but
none of the cheap software will work at this rate.


> Next, I'd move to Premiere 7 with my AB camera
> set up, and do my best to synch the two video tracks (after I capture
> each through firewire), and hope to god the two videos don't drift (if
> they did, I wouldn't even know how to address the problem).

I've found that different digital devices will drift apart slightly but
this drift rate is usually fairly constant and of the order of a frame
every few minutes.

Cheers.

James.
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 7:21:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Rec.arts.movies.production.sound

Also, since you'll be editing the video with different camera shots,
Edit and prep the soundtrack first.
Then edit the camera shots of choice to match the sound.
No synch, just matching by eye... You can see the difference.
You'll understand after this is done why it takes an army on set and another
army in post and weeks of dedicated piece-work to make something like this
for way more than $100 even at a base level.




On 8/2/05 1:14 AM, in article
1122959677.268348.228240@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com,
"johnmarnell@gmail.com" <johnmarnell@gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I'm trying to make a music promo vid (not an artsy music video or
> anything) look as professionally as I can, doing it pretty much by
> myself.
>
> I'm real serious about trying to do it right, and I just spent a good 4
> hours reading over all posts with the word "sync," so I have learned
> some stuff, but I'm still in the dark about a lot.
>
> SHORT VERSION:
> Using separate digital audio (RME Fireface (firewire) + Sonar4) and 2
> separate videos from different cameras, recording 10 minute
> performances (one take), will I encounter drift? Can I get around it
> and still make a professional looking (at least synched) promo vid?
> What steps should I take in the recording and editing process?
>
> And for those of you kind enough to want to know more, the
> FULL VERSION:
> My plan is to record myself at various open mics to get the illusion of
> multiple venues. I just invested A LOT (for me, at least) of money
> into a great, brand new firewire sound interface, the RME Fireface 800.
> I have a laptop running SONAR 4 Producer Edition. The rest of
> equipment, I'm desparately borrowing.
>
> I plan to have 2 cameras (I can call this AB, right?) filming me live,
> one doing close-ups, another one filming wider shots. These will not
> be amazing cameras, just mid-range miniDV ones, like a Canon ZR200 --
> additionally, they'll almost definitely be different models... I'm
> worried that will look bad cutting between the 2, and pose synching
> problems? For audio, I'll probably be going out of the PA (a Mackie
> 808s) inserts at line level and into the Fireface and onto SONAR. Or I
> could go into the fireface first, not sure yet (although, since I'll be
> bumming around open mics, I'll need to be as non-intrusive as possible,
> thus probably out of the PA / Mixer). Additionally, I'll have the 2
> scratch tracks from the cameras' mics.
>
> Each shoot will be about 10 minutes long: cameramen, laptop recorder
> all hit record and I do my thing. My big concern is syncing everything
> in post.
>
> Question 1.) People keep mentioning a clapboard -- I will not have this
> luxury in a public place with limited "crew," I suppose I could use a
> muffled strum before tunes as an aural/visual marker? (heh, I usually
> end up doing that anyway : ).
>
> Question 2.) I can't afford to buy a real camera that could interface
> with the crazy genclock device I'm also unable to afford, so, with
> these 10 minute takes, will I end up with a lot of "drift" trying to
> match up the fireface recorded tracks with the 2 (count em, 2) video
> tracks (from different cameras, no less)? Is drift reduced if you take
> smaller, individual takes (for instance, in between songs)?
>
> Question 3.) I hear I should record the audio at 48kHz to match the
> video? -- I don't really understand this btw, shouldn't they occupy
> the same temporal duration, regardless of the sound's bit depth /
> resolution? I shouldn't take advantage of my 192kHz capabilities?
>
> Question 4.) This one has to do with the overall process;i.e. am I
> going about it right? My plan is to go to these venues, get my audio
> and visual shots. So now I enter post. In looking at the daunting
> task of editing together 2 audio and 2 video tracks (I'm largely a
> newb... I've done some editing with iMovie and even less with Premiere
> for fun, but nothing this sound intensive), my first concern is that,
> for each "shoot," the 2 video tracks and the audio all synch up. So, I
> assume first I should mix my multi track audio to something I'm happy
> with, then export it? Next, I'd move to Premiere 7 with my AB camera
> set up, and do my best to synch the two video tracks (after I capture
> each through firewire), and hope to god the two videos don't drift (if
> they did, I wouldn't even know how to address the problem). Assuming I
> got the 2 video tracks to line up perfectly at the head, now I drop in
> my sound, line that up, and observe the horrible drift I'm
> nightmarishly envisioning running into. To fix that, is my only option
> to try and time stretch my audio to fit the video, or is there a more
> elegant way to try and account for this? Now with everything in line,
> I can make my cuts and hopefully not overdo it with silly wipes and
> Algerian font titles : )
>
> Whew. I realize that was a lot. I'm sorry, I wanted to be as detailed
> as possible so people could give me a good answer. Thank you so much
> in advance for any help!!!!
>
> -johnny
> www.johnnymarnell.com
>
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 9:26:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 02 Aug 2005 16:15:55 +0200, will wrote:

> Since you're doing this without sync, you can save yourself a lot of
> headaches and record your audio track beforehand. Then, when you're
> shooting your video, play back your pre-recorded audio track and simply
> play along with it. Solves any timing to video discrepancies that may
> crop up between varous video segments.

I don't see that could help. He is recording audio and video at the same
time, and wants to combine the audio and vido in sync.

Syncing audio and video is not a big problem, if you have a graphical
display of the audio from the video and the audio form the external
recording. Drift is not a big problem for small periods (some minutes).

If you have two camera's and switch from time to time between them, you
have a lot of posibilities to resync. So syncing is not a problem, butt it
will cost you some time.

When working with 2 camera's differences between camera's (brightnes,
contrast, colortemp, noise, sharpness etc.) can be a potential problem. I
think the first step should be to process one or both videostreems so they
look alike.

--
Chel van Gennip
Visit Serg van Gennip's site http://www.serg.vangennip.com
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 9:40:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thank you all so much for the posts! I'll let you know how it turns
out.
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 12:40:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
> With no synchronization (this is called "wild sync") you will
> certainly have some drift.

We do this a lot - recording spoken word (in church) to DV (Canon XM2) and
CD on a HHB Burn It there are no drift problems, certainly less than 1 frame
per hour. However I am doing some location music work at the moment and the
drift (to a Sony portable CD player) is horrendous!

Drift is not inevitable, but I'm quite shocked as to how far out a CD player
can be.
--
re-configure the solar matrix in parallel for endothermic propulsion
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 3:32:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 02 Aug 2005 17:26:12 +0200, Chel van Gennip
<chel@vangennip.nl> wrote:

>
>I don't see that could help. He is recording audio and video at the same
>time, and wants to combine the audio and vido in sync.

Yeah. But the suggestion is that he doesn't. Get a good recording
beforehand, then work to playback. The audience won't care - they'll
quite enjoy being part of a filming session as long as you don't go
for TOO many retakes :-)

The cameras will pick up the music on their internal mics. Use the
audio waveform as a visual synch reference when video editing. You
won't drift much with digital gear. Anyway, you can re-align every
shot if necessary.
Anonymous
August 3, 2005 7:00:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 8/2/05 12:51 PM, in article znr1122979716k@trad, "Mike Rivers"
<mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote:

> With no synchronization (this is called "wild sync") you will
> certainly have some drift. The way to deal with it for your
> production, assuming it's a typical music video, is to let the music
> be your time reference, and cut the video so that you don't notice
> when things go out of sync.
>
> One simple concept is to put a close-up of your face or your picking
> hand at the beginning of an important phrase and adjust the picture so
> that it's in sync with the music. It will stay in sync for at least a
> line or two, but don't hold it any longer. At an appropriate emotional
> point, switch to another shot and get that in sync as closely as you
> can.

Like any interview show, you cover ANY sort of missing or ugly video moment
("this is where the drunk knocked the camera over") with another camera shot
from ANY SONG AT ALL as long as for a moment it LOOKS like it cold be from
that song (open mouth and strumming/picking... extreme-close-up of cute babe
in audience smiling clapping etc) and then cut back after you got the beer
off the lens.
You can even shoot some generic cutaway material at home...

>
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 12:27:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

johnmarnell wrote ...
> I plan to have 2 cameras (I can call this AB, right?) filming
> me live, one doing close-ups, another one filming wider
> shots. These will not be amazing cameras, just mid-range
> miniDV ones, like a Canon ZR200 -- additionally, they'll
> almost definitely be different models... I'm worried that will
> look bad cutting between the 2, and pose synching problems?

I would be FAR more concerned about two different cameras
*looking* different than *sounding* different, or *syncing* up.
If you are looking for a very informal, grungy home-movie, MTV
look, likely OK. BUT, if you are looking for any kind of quality
video I predict a lot of (semi-successful) image painting is in
your future. :-( AT LEAST use two cameras of the same brand.
(Both Panasonic or both Sony, etc.) This is a much bigger
concern for me than any of your synchronizing nightmares.

> Question 1.) People keep mentioning a clapboard -- I will
> not have this luxury in a public place with limited "crew,"
> I suppose I could use a muffled strum before tunes as an aural/
> visual marker? (heh, I usually end up doing that anyway : ).

I have found a simple, single hand-clap quite effective. But
chances are you likely don't even need that.

> Question 2.) I can't afford to buy a real camera that could interface
> with the crazy genclock device I'm also unable to afford, so, with
> these 10 minute takes, will I end up with a lot of "drift" trying to
> match up the fireface recorded tracks with the 2 (count em, 2) video
> tracks (from different cameras, no less)? Is drift reduced if you
> take
> smaller, individual takes (for instance, in between songs)?

Assuming you are going to cut (or dissolve, etc.) between the
camera shots (or why would you be using two cameras)? At each
point where you make a video transition, you have the opportunity
to "slip" the video track into sync with your reference audio track
(presumably the one from the Fireface). Having the same audio
track recorded on each camcorder makes it even easier to slip each
shot/clip into sync. Really much simpler to do than to explain.

> Question 3.) I hear I should record the audio at 48kHz to match the
> video? -- I don't really understand this btw, shouldn't they occupy
> the same temporal duration, regardless of the sound's bit depth /
> resolution? I shouldn't take advantage of my 192kHz capabilities?

The only reason would be to avoid the conversion artifacts when
the audio is converted to 16 x 48k for video editing.

> Question 4.) This one has to do with the overall process;i.e. am I
> going about it right? My plan is to go to these venues, get my audio
> and visual shots. So now I enter post. In looking at the daunting
> task of editing together 2 audio and 2 video tracks (I'm largely a
> newb... I've done some editing with iMovie and even less with Premiere
> for fun, but nothing this sound intensive), my first concern is that,
> for each "shoot," the 2 video tracks and the audio all synch up. So,
> I
> assume first I should mix my multi track audio to something I'm happy
> with, then export it?

Yes. I would export it as a 16-bit x 48K.

> Next, I'd move to Premiere 7 with my AB camera > set up,
> and do my best to synch the two video tracks (after I capture
> each through firewire), and hope to god the two videos don't
> drift (if they did, I wouldn't even know how to address the
> problem).

At every video edit point, you have the opportunity to slip the
video track back/forth to match your master audio track. It
really is MUCH simpler than you are imagining. I know from
personal experience doing exactly this kind of thing.

> Assuming I got the 2 video tracks to line up perfectly at the
> head, now I drop in my sound, line that up,

No. I would drop the sound in FIRST. THAT is your overall
reference track. Then drop the video track(s) in and slide them
into sync (at least at the head) with your reference audio track.

> and observe the horrible drift I'm nightmarishly envisioning
> running into.

Your nighmares are misplaced. First, if you DO encounter drift,
it will likely be nothing as big as you are imagining. And second,
even if it IS, it is REALLY easy to "fix".

> To fix that, is my only option to try and time stretch my audio to
> fit the video,

No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, No, (NO NO)
First, you don't WANT to do that because of the artifacts of
the streching. Second, you don't NEED to do that because it is
so easy to fix by slipping the video at each edit point.

> or is there a more elegant way to try and account for this?

Check the sync at each video edit point. If it is out, simply slip
the video clip to match. Simple as that. If you have a really
long video shot that goes out of sync, you can use a "cuttaway"
or "insert" shot as an excuse for a video edit point. Or you can
stretch the video to match the audio. (Or easier, just cut or add
a frame in an appropriate spot.)

> Now with everything in line, I can make my cuts and hopefully
> not overdo it with silly wipes and Algerian font titles : )

Don't get me started on that! :-)
!