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Cabling question: blue/white twisted pair

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Anonymous
August 6, 2005 7:35:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In twisted-pair cable, is there a convention for which is hot
and which is cold ? Blue hot ? White hot ?

--
André Majorel <URL:http://www.teaser.fr/~amajorel/&gt;
(Counterfeit: ebovahyv@catalysis.com uwicateh@loosestrife.com)
"J'baiserai la France jusqu'à ce qu'elle m'aime." -- Un rappeur
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 7:35:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Andre Majorel <cheney@halliburton.com> wrote:
>In twisted-pair cable, is there a convention for which is hot
>and which is cold ? Blue hot ? White hot ?

Not really. I think the dark color should always be hot, but then I
think pin 3 should always be hot too.

All that matters is that it's the same on both ends.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 7:35:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sat, 6 Aug 2005 15:35:31 +0000 (UTC), Andre Majorel
<cheney@halliburton.com> wrote:

>In twisted-pair cable, is there a convention for which is hot
>and which is cold ? Blue hot ? White hot ?

In some trades there is:
<http://www.homephonewiring.com/clr-code.html&gt;

Phone Colors
Red = Blu/Wht, Grn = Wht/Blu
Yel = Org/Wht, Blk = Wht/Org
Blu = Grn/Wht, Wht = Wht/Grn
Line 1:
RING: Blu/Wht => Red (Negative)
TIP: Wht/Blu => Green (Positive)
Line 2:
RING: Org/Wht => Yellow (Negative)
TIP: Wht/Org => Black (Positive)
Line 3:
RING: Grn/Wht => Blue (Negative)
TIP: Wht/Grn => White (Positive)

So Blue and Blu/Wht both end up being ring.

Of course the (positive) TIP voltage is at Ground potential and the
spec for the RING voltage is -48 volts, so "hot" might be debated. And
having red = negative and green = positive counteracts all normal
logic... Unless you are still in denial about the unit of electricity
being a negative quantity... Of course if you then switch to
solid-color cable, blue connects to red...

Probably best to ignore this.

Loren
Related resources
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 7:35:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <slrndf9m63.5hg.cheney@atc5.vermine.org> cheney@halliburton.com writes:

> In twisted-pair cable, is there a convention for which is hot
> and which is cold ? Blue hot ? White hot ?

You get to be the design engineer here. Pick which color you want to
go to Pin 2 or the Tip and stick with that at least through that
cable. If you're making up a bunch of cables, it's nice to have a
"house standard" but it's completely arbitrary.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 8:29:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 6 Aug 2005 12:07:31 -0400, kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

>Andre Majorel <cheney@halliburton.com> wrote:
>>In twisted-pair cable, is there a convention for which is hot
>>and which is cold ? Blue hot ? White hot ?
>
>Not really. I think the dark color should always be hot, but then I
>think pin 3 should always be hot too.
>
>All that matters is that it's the same on both ends.
>--scott

Of course on a balanced interconnect, both are equally hot.

d

Pearce Consulting
http://www.pearce.uk.com
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 8:29:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <42fce56c.30421781@text.usenet.plus.net> donald@pearce.uk.com writes:

> Of course on a balanced interconnect, both are equally hot.

Oh, no! Let's not go there.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 11:33:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 6 Aug 2005 15:13:08 -0400, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote:

>
>In article <42fce56c.30421781@text.usenet.plus.net> donald@pearce.uk.com writes:
>
>> Of course on a balanced interconnect, both are equally hot.
>
>Oh, no! Let's not go there.

Why's that? Another can of worms fabricated by "Music engineers" that
you would rather not pen?

d

Pearce Consulting
http://www.pearce.uk.com
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 12:31:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <43031057.41409281@text.usenet.plus.net> donald@pearce.uk.com writes:

> >> Of course on a balanced interconnect, both are equally hot.
> >
> >Oh, no! Let's not go there.
>
> Why's that? Another can of worms fabricated by "Music engineers" that
> you would rather not pen?

Already opened and closed. See my article in the July 1999 issue of
Recording Magazine.

Oh, that's right, you don't read magazines for artists who drive
desks.

Never mind.

Where is this confrontation coming from? I keep looking at the message
headers expecting to see cross-postings from rec.audio.opinion or
someplace like that, but all I see is rec.audio.pro. We normally try
to understand audio applications in the real world here.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 12:36:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Don Pearce" <donald@pearce.uk.com> wrote:
>
> Do you get all that from what I have described as a minor niggle?

Heck no. That was just a recent example of what I perceived as a trend
in the tenor of your messages. I have, over the years, interpreted your
comments regarding both procedures (most notably compression) and
terminology as coming from a disgusted individual. Perhaps I have
misread your intent.

--
"It CAN'T be too loud... some of the red lights aren't even on yet!"
- Lorin David Schultz
in the control room
making even bad news sound good

(Remove spamblock to reply)
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 12:53:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 20:36:25 GMT, "Lorin David Schultz"
<Lorin@DAMNSPAM!v5v.ca> wrote:

>"Don Pearce" <donald@pearce.uk.com> wrote:
>>
>> Do you get all that from what I have described as a minor niggle?
>
>Heck no. That was just a recent example of what I perceived as a trend
>in the tenor of your messages. I have, over the years, interpreted your
>comments regarding both procedures (most notably compression) and
>terminology as coming from a disgusted individual. Perhaps I have
>misread your intent.

Compression is something (the way it is currently used) that I regard
as a heinous crime that is wrecking a discipline I like greatly. I
don't believe for one moment it has been instigated at an engineering
level, but rather at the marketing level.

I'm pretty sure I am not alone on this group or any other in that
opinion. I just wish sometimes that engineers at the desk would make a
stand for quality rather than loudness.

OK, maybe I tend to post when I think something needs saying, rather
than just to hear the sound of my own voice, but that is me. I don't
let stuff pass lightly.

d

Pearce Consulting
http://www.pearce.uk.com
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 2:35:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 2005-08-06, Scott Dorsey <kludge@panix.com> wrote:
> Andre Majorel <cheney@halliburton.com> wrote:
>>In twisted-pair cable, is there a convention for which is hot
>>and which is cold ? Blue hot ? White hot ?
>
> Not really. I think the dark color should always be hot, but then I
> think pin 3 should always be hot too.

At least that would be consistent with electrical cabling
conventions (brown live, blue neutral).

--
André Majorel <URL:http://www.teaser.fr/~amajorel/&gt;
(Counterfeit: colop@passband.com zuwiweg@dissertation.com)
"J'baiserai la France jusqu'à ce qu'elle m'aime." -- Un rappeur
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 2:35:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Andre Majorel" wrote ...
> On 2005-08-06, Scott Dorsey wrote:
>> Andre Majorel wrote:
>>>In twisted-pair cable, is there a convention for which is hot
>>>and which is cold ? Blue hot ? White hot ?
>>
>> Not really. I think the dark color should always be hot, but then I
>> think pin 3 should always be hot too.
>
> At least that would be consistent with electrical cabling
> conventions (brown live, blue neutral).

Or black=live, white=neutral on the left side of the Pond.
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 9:56:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Andre Majorel wrote:

> In twisted-pair cable, is there a convention for which is hot
> and which is cold ? Blue hot ? White hot ?

I hate it whenever I come across cable like that. Give me red and black
any day.

European usage allocates blue to the neutral conductor for ac power - so
I'd tend to go with blue cold and white hot.

Also since blue is often associated with cold and 'white hot' sounds
good - I reckon that'll do ! ;-)

I know of no convention it has to be said.

Graham
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 11:57:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 6 Aug 2005 20:31:01 -0400, mrivers@d-and-d.com (Mike Rivers) wrote:

>
>In article <43031057.41409281@text.usenet.plus.net> donald@pearce.uk.com writes:
>
>> >> Of course on a balanced interconnect, both are equally hot.
>> >
>> >Oh, no! Let's not go there.
>>
>> Why's that? Another can of worms fabricated by "Music engineers" that
>> you would rather not pen?
>
>Already opened and closed. See my article in the July 1999 issue of
>Recording Magazine.
>
>Oh, that's right, you don't read magazines for artists who drive
>desks.
>
>Never mind.
>
>Where is this confrontation coming from? I keep looking at the message
>headers expecting to see cross-postings from rec.audio.opinion or
>someplace like that, but all I see is rec.audio.pro. We normally try
>to understand audio applications in the real world here.

Don't look. It was a boring, rainy day yesterday. It needed a little
spice.

d

Pearce Consulting
http://www.pearce.uk.com
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 2:50:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

So far you have mentioned the first circuit in a popular multipair sequence
of differently coloured twisted pairs), which happens to be blue and white.
What about instinctive hot and cold feelings for the other umpteen pairs?
Jim

"Pooh Bear" <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:42F59490.D8DD5515@hotmail.com...
>
> Andre Majorel wrote:
>
>> In twisted-pair cable, is there a convention for which is hot
>> and which is cold ? Blue hot ? White hot ?
>
> I hate it whenever I come across cable like that. Give me red and black
> any day.
>
> European usage allocates blue to the neutral conductor for ac power - so
> I'd tend to go with blue cold and white hot.
>
> Also since blue is often associated with cold and 'white hot' sounds
> good - I reckon that'll do ! ;-)
>
> I know of no convention it has to be said.
>
> Graham
>
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 4:57:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jim Gregory wrote:

> So far you have mentioned the first circuit in a popular multipair sequence
> of differently coloured twisted pairs), which happens to be blue and white.
> What about instinctive hot and cold feelings for the other umpteen pairs?
> Jim

What makes you say blue and white are the first circuit in a multipair
arrangement ?

If I was dealing with a multiple conductor cable, there's often a guide that
gives conductor number vs colour/colour. I'd follow that for a multipair.

Blue and white simply seem to be a popular ( Asian ) alternative to red and
black in classic screened mic cable.

Graham
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 4:57:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in
news:42F5F71B.132D2FE3@hotmail.com:

> What makes you say blue and white are the first circuit in a multipair
> arrangement ?

It's the standard for US telelphone multipair.

White w/blue stripe and Blue w/White stripe or just a white wire twisted
with a blue wire constitute the first pair.

White/Orange is the second pair.
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 4:57:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

YES (I'd said popular). Etc, etc, etc up to 80 or even sometimes 160 pairs
in overall sheaths - for 0.5 solid telecomms wires in the UK, as well as by
broadcasters for installations.
New wire colours (and colours for 10-group streamers) are introduced, the
higher the sequence rises.
Lay mnemonics help users remember the colour sequences.
Jim

"Carey Carlan" <gulfjoe@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xns96AB56B8E43B5gulfjoehotmailcom@140.99.99.130...
> Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in
> news:42F5F71B.132D2FE3@hotmail.com:
>
>> What makes you say blue and white are the first circuit in a multipair
>> arrangement ?
>
> It's the standard for US telelphone multipair.
>
> White w/blue stripe and Blue w/White stripe or just a white wire twisted
> with a blue wire constitute the first pair.
>
> White/Orange is the second pair.
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 5:51:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 11:38:45 -0700, Loren Amelang <loren@pacific.net>
wrote:

>On Sat, 6 Aug 2005 15:35:31 +0000 (UTC), Andre Majorel
><cheney@halliburton.com> wrote:
>
>>In twisted-pair cable, is there a convention for which is hot
>>and which is cold ? Blue hot ? White hot ?
>
>In some trades there is:
><http://www.homephonewiring.com/clr-code.html&gt;
>
>Phone Colors
>Red = Blu/Wht, Grn = Wht/Blu
>Yel = Org/Wht, Blk = Wht/Org
>Blu = Grn/Wht, Wht = Wht/Grn
>Line 1:
>RING: Blu/Wht => Red (Negative)
>TIP: Wht/Blu => Green (Positive)
>Line 2:
>RING: Org/Wht => Yellow (Negative)
>TIP: Wht/Org => Black (Positive)
>Line 3:
>RING: Grn/Wht => Blue (Negative)
>TIP: Wht/Grn => White (Positive)
>

This colour code originated with the Bell Telephone Company and is
commonly used in North American telephones, radio stations, and
anywhere that uses 25-pair unshielded telco style cable.

There is, as always, some ambiguity about which way to wire an XLR
connector, as there were two different standards (British vs. US,
Ampex vs. Scully, etc.) until recently. At least we all agreed that
pin 1 is ground (or is it shield ... or maybe earth).

And telco practice for a TRS connector (red = ring = in-phase) is
different from audio practice (tip = in-phase). Telco practice would
cause a phase reversal if you connected an unbalanced TS connector to
a TRS jack. In telco world, there are NO unbalanced connections.

Mike T.
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 6:22:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Carey Carlan wrote:

> Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in
> news:42F5F71B.132D2FE3@hotmail.com:
>
> > What makes you say blue and white are the first circuit in a multipair
> > arrangement ?
>
> It's the standard for US telelphone multipair.

Ahhh.... Thanks for that. It probably explains why blue and white crop up in
mic cable from time to time.

> White w/blue stripe and Blue w/White stripe or just a white wire twisted
> with a blue wire constitute the first pair.
>
> White/Orange is the second pair.

Ok - here's another type from a UK supplier. Red and Black are cores 1 and
2.

http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/37240.pdf

Graham
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 6:22:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Graham, I don't think those wires are twisted pairs, but multicore singles.

The various twisted-pair colour conventions may differ from spec to spec,
but then each was created/adopted as a "house" standard initially by a large
user. Some popular colour codes have very wide acceptance. Just like a
patois (language) spoken by and adhered to in a community (or enlarged
community).
And the so-called hot or cold half comes into play only if low voltage DC is
present or if low voltage AC/AF phasing is important. As long as one end is
continuous and sequentially traceable with the other end, that's what
matters.

"Pooh Bear" <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:42F60B1D.2BFD44B@hotmail.com...
>
>
> Carey Carlan wrote:
>
>> Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in
>> news:42F5F71B.132D2FE3@hotmail.com:
>>
>> > What makes you say blue and white are the first circuit in a multipair
>> > arrangement ?
>>
>> It's the standard for US telelphone multipair.
>
> Ahhh.... Thanks for that. It probably explains why blue and white crop up
> in
> mic cable from time to time.
>
>> White w/blue stripe and Blue w/White stripe or just a white wire twisted
>> with a blue wire constitute the first pair.
>>
>> White/Orange is the second pair.
>
> Ok - here's another type from a UK supplier. Red and Black are cores 1 and
> 2.
>
> http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/37240.pdf
>
> Graham
>
>
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 6:28:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jim Gregory wrote:

> YES (I'd said popular). Etc, etc, etc up to 80 or even sometimes 160 pairs
> in overall sheaths - for 0.5 solid telecomms wires in the UK, as well as by
> broadcasters for installations.
> New wire colours (and colours for 10-group streamers) are introduced, the
> higher the sequence rises.
> Lay mnemonics help users remember the colour sequences.
> Jim

I have however found other charts for conductor numbering. The quoted example
is simply one instance of one particular convention. It's certainly not a
universal convention no matter how popular.

Whatever you do, please don't use solid conductor cable for anything other than
very, *very* fixed installations !

Graham
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 7:13:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jim Gregory wrote:

> Graham, I don't think those wires are twisted pairs, but multicore singles.

Actually - I suspect you're right but then neither is telco 25 conductor twisted
pairs either AFAIK. Certainly there's going to be one conductor going spare !

> The various twisted-pair colour conventions may differ from spec to spec,
> but then each was created/adopted as a "house" standard initially by a large
> user. Some popular colour codes have very wide acceptance. Just like a
> patois (language) spoken by and adhered to in a community (or enlarged
> community).
> And the so-called hot or cold half comes into play only if low voltage DC is
> present or if low voltage AC/AF phasing is important. As long as one end is
> continuous and sequentially traceable with the other end, that's what
> matters.

Yup.

Graham
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 7:13:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Pooh Bear" wrote ...
> Actually - I suspect you're right but then neither is telco
> 25 conductor twisted pairs either AFAIK. Certainly there's
> going to be one conductor going spare !

All the 6-, 25- or 50-pair telephone cables I've ever seen
ARE twisted. Not nearly as many turns/length as CAT5, etc.
but twisted, nonetheless. And I've never seen a telco cable
with a spare wire or pair.
http://www.answers.com/topic/25-pair-color-code
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 7:17:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike T." wrote:

< snip >

> There is, as always, some ambiguity about which way to wire an XLR
> connector, as there were two different standards (British vs. US,
> Ampex vs. Scully, etc.) until recently.

Until about ~ 20 - 25 yrs ago to be accurate.

No issue any more. Pin 2 = hot Pin 3 = cold.

Just make sure you realise Pin 3 is in the middle though. It's caught out
some ppl including one cheap Asian copier of the Switchcraft style of
'XLR'. I know of one instance where that caused loads of fun since the
guy doing the wiring did it by the numbers instead of familiarity with
the connector.

Graham
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 11:45:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in
news:42F616FC.4433AF33@hotmail.com:

>
> Jim Gregory wrote:
>
>> Graham, I don't think those wires are twisted pairs, but
>> multicore singles.
>
> Actually - I suspect you're right but then neither is telco 25
> conductor twisted pairs either AFAIK. Certainly there's going
> to be one conductor going spare !

Telco cable is 25 pairs of conductors, not 25 conductors grouped
into pairs....and in larger cables, each group of 25 pairs is
twisted as a group, and bound with a bi-color spiral ribbon, the
colour coding of which duplicates the colour coding of the pairs,
so the first ribbon is blue-white. It may be a telco proprietary
standard, but it's a d@mn-well thought out one.

--
Bob Quintal

PA is y I've altered my email address.
Anonymous
August 7, 2005 11:48:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in
news:42F617FB.5A6B1EF8@hotmail.com:

>
> "Mike T." wrote:
>
> < snip >
>
>> There is, as always, some ambiguity about which way to wire
>> an XLR connector, as there were two different standards
>> (British vs. US, Ampex vs. Scully, etc.) until recently.
>
> Until about ~ 20 - 25 yrs ago to be accurate.
>
> No issue any more. Pin 2 = hot Pin 3 = cold.
>
> Just make sure you realise Pin 3 is in the middle though. It's
> caught out some ppl including one cheap Asian copier of the
> Switchcraft style of 'XLR'. I know of one instance where that
> caused loads of fun since the guy doing the wiring did it by
> the numbers instead of familiarity with the connector.
>
> Graham
>
Huh?? Pin 3 is on the second row...That's how it got to be in
the middle!;-)



--
Bob Quintal

PA is y I've altered my email address.
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 1:43:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bob Quintal wrote:

> Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in
> news:42F617FB.5A6B1EF8@hotmail.com:
>
> >
> > "Mike T." wrote:
> >
> > < snip >
> >
> >> There is, as always, some ambiguity about which way to wire
> >> an XLR connector, as there were two different standards
> >> (British vs. US, Ampex vs. Scully, etc.) until recently.
> >
> > Until about ~ 20 - 25 yrs ago to be accurate.
> >
> > No issue any more. Pin 2 = hot Pin 3 = cold.
> >
> > Just make sure you realise Pin 3 is in the middle though. It's
> > caught out some ppl including one cheap Asian copier of the
> > Switchcraft style of 'XLR'. I know of one instance where that
> > caused loads of fun since the guy doing the wiring did it by
> > the numbers instead of familiarity with the connector.
> >
> > Graham
>
> Huh?? Pin 3 is on the second row...That's how it got to be in
> the middle!;-)

Pin 3 of a 3 pin XLR style connector is 'between' Pin1 and Pin 2. I call
that the 'middle'. Sorry if that wasn't clear.

Graham
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 1:43:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Huh?? Pin 3 is on the second row...That's how it got to be in
>> the middle!;-)
>
>Pin 3 of a 3 pin XLR style connector is 'between' Pin1 and Pin 2. I call
>that the 'middle'. Sorry if that wasn't clear.

This is, however, NOT the case for DIN and Tuchel connectors....
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 11:52:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Also since blue is often associated with cold and 'white hot' sounds
> good - I reckon that'll do ! ;-)

"White hot" is how I always remember it. I guess I am glad Canare didn't
red instead of blue.

Rob R.
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 5:29:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Rob Reedijk wrote:

> Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Also since blue is often associated with cold and 'white hot' sounds
> > good - I reckon that'll do ! ;-)
>
> "White hot" is how I always remember it. I guess I am glad Canare didn't
> red instead of blue.

Oh yeah, I've seen the red and white conductor stuff too. I wonder where all
these different conventions arose ?

Graham
Anonymous
August 12, 2005 5:27:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pooh Bear wrote:

> Andre Majorel wrote:
>
>
>>In twisted-pair cable, is there a convention for which is hot
>>and which is cold ? Blue hot ? White hot ?
>
>
> I hate it whenever I come across cable like that. Give me red and black
> any day.
>
> European usage allocates blue to the neutral conductor for ac power - so
> I'd tend to go with blue cold and white hot.
>
> Also since blue is often associated with cold and 'white hot' sounds
> good - I reckon that'll do ! ;-)

Hmmm, make sure your medical insurance is paid up if you ever do any
electrical work in North America, where white is typically neutral, and
black, red, or blue are the "hot" (black is most common, red is added
for split or dual-leg circuits, and blue is added for three-phase
setups). Green is usually ground, or just a plain uninsulated conductor.

Of course, engineers can never leave well enough alone... most
low-voltage DC systems (like in cars), black is ground, except in some
Fords where red is ground... yeesh.


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Anonymous
August 12, 2005 5:27:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Matt Ion" wrote ...
> Of course, engineers can never leave well enough alone... most
> low-voltage DC systems (like in cars), black is ground, except in some
> Fords where red is ground... yeesh.

Do you mean that the Fords were positive ground, or that
they just used "red" for the negative/ground side?
Anonymous
August 13, 2005 1:52:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Richard Crowley wrote:
> "Matt Ion" wrote ...
>
>> Of course, engineers can never leave well enough alone... most
>> low-voltage DC systems (like in cars), black is ground, except in some
>> Fords where red is ground... yeesh.
>
>
> Do you mean that the Fords were positive ground, or that
> they just used "red" for the negative/ground side?

Negative ground, but seemed to intentionally avoid color conventions.


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