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Reversed phase LPs or CDs.

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Anonymous
August 11, 2005 4:03:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Over some years of community broadcasting I have come across many cases of
phase reversal of either the left or right channels of commercially recorded
medium,LP or CD.Home made recordings ,irrespective of the medium
,immediately raise suspicions for obvious reasons and are effectively
removed from the broadcasting chain by absolute methods---TOTAL BANNING!!

Any faulty LP audio is easily made usable by recording to a computer with
one of the the pickup cartridge's stereo channels reversed at the
cartridge.The result is then burned to a CD usually in MP3 format. Faulty
commercial CD recordings however pose a problem which I don't quite know how
to fix.

Might I ask for opinions as to how we might proceed to fix this type of
problem (unfortunately,always AFTER being broadcast)? We have Adobe Audition
and other software but I am not sufficently computer (applications
literate?) to know how to use these correctly.If any "special" software
might be required,we have the funds.

Another point that someone might clarify ,is there a test for absolute phase
of any channel?All information gratefully received.



Thanks for the read.



Brian Goldsmith. 3GDR Melbourne.

More about : reversed phase lps cds

Anonymous
August 11, 2005 4:03:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I assume what you're talking about is the relatively polarity reversal of
one channel. This leads to the sum (L+R) appearing on the subcarrier, the
difference (L-R) on the main carrier.

I've never seen or heard this on any commercial recording, and I've been
listening for 40 years. If you're worried about it, simply hook an
oscilloscope set to show one channel as X deflection, the other as Y
deflection. The resulting Lissajous pattern will show whether you're in or
out of phase. When in phase, the bulk of the pattern will move from the
lower-left to the upper-right of the display. When out of phase, the pattern
will rotate 90 degrees to the left, with movement from the lower-right to
the upper-left.
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 4:03:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Brian Goldsmith <brian.goldsmith@nospam.echo1.com.au> wrote:
>Over some years of community broadcasting I have come across many cases of
>phase reversal of either the left or right channels of commercially recorded
>medium,LP or CD.Home made recordings ,irrespective of the medium
>,immediately raise suspicions for obvious reasons and are effectively
>removed from the broadcasting chain by absolute methods---TOTAL BANNING!!

Well, in the LP era, this sort of thing very seldom happened accidentally.
It's much harder to cut a record made this way, and the mastering engineer
invariably has a phase meter, so if one channel is out of phase it is usually
very obvious in the mastering room.

BUT, a lot of this stuff was done deliberately... there are a lot of
recordings in the sixties with individual parts put out of phase to make
them more aethereal. This results in recordings that are damned hard to
cut, and which you can't fix by putting one channel out of phase because
then the rest of the material is out of polarity.

The way this was handled for broadcast stuff is that seperate mono and
stereo mixes would be made. Radio stations would either get the mono
version of the LP, or they'd get a 45 with the stereo mix on one side
and the mono mix on the other.

>Any faulty LP audio is easily made usable by recording to a computer with
>one of the the pickup cartridge's stereo channels reversed at the
>cartridge.The result is then burned to a CD usually in MP3 format. Faulty
>commercial CD recordings however pose a problem which I don't quite know how
>to fix.

You can do the same thing if you have a balanced output on your CD player.
Swap pins 2 and 3 on one channel.

Or you can use any digital editing software, and reverse polarity on one
channel.

>Might I ask for opinions as to how we might proceed to fix this type of
>problem (unfortunately,always AFTER being broadcast)? We have Adobe Audition
>and other software but I am not sufficently computer (applications
>literate?) to know how to use these correctly.If any "special" software
>might be required,we have the funds.

Once it's been broadcast, it's too late. Phase rotators in the broadcast
chain will make a hash of anything recorded this way. So if you want to fix
an aircheck tape with a recording made this way, you're hosed.

>Another point that someone might clarify ,is there a test for absolute phase
>of any channel?All information gratefully received.

Well, there are two obvious things you can do: first listen in mono and
see what falls out, and secondly use a phase meter. Hopefully anyone
even remotely competent is checking their mixes for mono compatibility
in the studio before they hand them off.

Again, a lot of radio stations used to have an X-Y display on the
top of the console, along with a compression indicator and the VU meters.
This gives you a good idea of what is going on with the stuff being aired
at least.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
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Anonymous
August 11, 2005 4:03:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Brian Goldsmith" <brian.goldsmith@nospam.echo1.com.au>
wrote in message
news:8BwKe.78793$oJ.22370@news-server.bigpond.net.au

> Over some years of community broadcasting I have come
> across many cases of phase reversal of either the left or
> right channels of commercially recorded medium,LP or
> CD.Home made recordings ,irrespective of the medium
> ,immediately raise suspicions for obvious reasons and are
> effectively removed from the broadcasting chain by
> absolute methods---TOTAL BANNING!!

> Any faulty LP audio is easily made usable by recording to
> a computer with one of the the pickup cartridge's stereo
> channels reversed at the cartridge.The result is then
> burned to a CD usually in MP3 format. Faulty commercial
> CD recordings however pose a problem which I don't quite
> know how to fix.

Not to worry.

> Might I ask for opinions as to how we might proceed to
> fix this type of problem (unfortunately,always AFTER
> being broadcast)?


> We have Adobe Audition and other
> software but I am not sufficently computer (applications
> literate?) to know how to use these correctly.If any
> "special" software might be required,we have the funds.

No special software required.

Adobe Audition will directly read a CD and make it available
for editing.

To change the polarity of one channel, simply use Effects,
Amplitude, Channel Mixer with the following settings:
100,0,-100,0

> Another point that someone might clarify ,is there a test
> for absolute phase of any channel?

Not without reference to some original information with
known correct polarity, in which case the simplest thing to
do would be to use the data with known correct polarity
instead of fixing up some other data.

> All information gratefully received.
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 4:03:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Brian Goldsmith" wrote ...
> Over some years of community broadcasting I have come
> across many cases of phase reversal of either the left or
> right channels of commercially recorded medium,LP or CD.

IIRC, one of the Sheffield Labs direct-to-disc releases had a
liner note recommending reversing the polarity of one of the
channels(?)
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 4:03:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I post this because I don't see it in anyone elses excellent replies.

As to how home recorded or burned CD's end up with Phase reversal...
This was actually a pretty common "Glitch" seen with earlier (older) PC
burners and/or burning software. I did a fair ammount of stereo
mastering on a PC in those days and I was constantly seeing the L/R
Channel meters reversed. If you saved the file without noticing... it
was saved. Of course it'seasy to fix in any audio software assuming
you re-opened the file and saw it before burning.

The burner drivers and burning software were also notorious for doing
this. I saw posts on this News Group about it.

My take at the time was that it was a Windoz and drivers issue.
Closing the audio software and re-opening it usually cleared up the
problem.

Back then I was using Windoz 98 but since I started using 2000 and XP,
I havent seen it again.
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 9:13:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Just flip polarity on one or the other channel.

This will Not work on things that have ONE element recorded badly in stereo
with mis-matched polarity microphones. I have a 60's collection of Christmas
stuff by Kostelanetz that has some key mic in the overall mix flopped and
there's nothing you can do t fix the imaging...
John Hiatt's recording of FEELS LIKE RAIN comes to mind which (I'm guessing)
is a classic example of an open-back guitar amp mic'd front and rear
WITHOUT flipping one of the mics and split hard-L/R. In stereo it just
GRATES and in mono the guitar just nearly vanishes... What are these folks
THINKING about?
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 10:51:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:nNCdnS6sgKiRLWffRVn-gA@comcast.com...

> No special software required.
>
> Adobe Audition will directly read a CD and make it available
> for editing.
>
> To change the polarity of one channel, simply use Effects,
> Amplitude, Channel Mixer with the following settings:
> 100,0,-100,0

There's an easier way. Read the CD onto the hard disk using Audition, open
the file, and highlight the channel you want to invert. You do that by
putting the cursor at the bottom of the window showing the right channel, or
the top of the window showing the left channel, and double-clicking. Then
click on the Effects menu and click on Invert. The highlighted channel will
have its polarity flipped.

This works for any .wav file, whether ripped from a CD or recorded from an
analog source.

I have to say, though, that I've seen very few recordings that were totally
out of phase. I confess, though, that I made one of them...one of the first
live concerts I recorded, Tom Lehrer doing a benefit for the McGovern
campaign in 1972, in a living room. Great concert, even better once I
cleaned the polarity issue up.

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 11:53:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

You are right, I was addressing another issue. It was late OK? The
dog ate it! etc...etc...etc...
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 2:25:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1123737105.170549.252370@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com> dkitchell@mindspring.com writes:

> As to how home recorded or burned CD's end up with Phase reversal...
> This was actually a pretty common "Glitch" seen with earlier (older) PC
> burners and/or burning software. I did a fair ammount of stereo
> mastering on a PC in those days and I was constantly seeing the L/R
> Channel meters reversed.

This, I think, is a different problem than what's being discussed. It
happens sometimes when the sample count gets screwed up and the order
of left-sample-right-sample is changed. Worst case is when this
happens intermittently throughout the recording, and sometimes it
would. However the efect only causes left/right reversal. The guitar
player who used to be on the left suddenly jumps over to the right (or
the guitar player you know is on the left plays on the right).

The problem at hand is when one channel is inverted in polarity. When
the two channels are combined in mono, they'll cancel. And when
listening in stereo, it sounds like a big hole in the middle that's
trying to pull your head into by the eardrums. (How's that for drama?)

This is just a careless mistake that didn't get caught. I know of a
few commercial movies on video that got duplicated with one audio
channel flipped, with one channel where they didn't decode the Dolby
noise reduction, where the channels are reversed left to right (easy
to tell by looking at the picture).

People screw up, and the people who are supposed to check for screwups
before manufacturing or broadcast screw up. It makes for screwy audio
sometimes.



--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 2:30:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 10 Aug 2005 20:03:16 -0400, Brian Goldsmith wrote
(in article <8BwKe.78793$oJ.22370@news-server.bigpond.net.au>):

> Over some years of community broadcasting I have come across many cases of
> phase reversal of either the left or right channels of commercially recorded
> medium,LP or CD.Home made recordings ,irrespective of the medium
> ,immediately raise suspicions for obvious reasons and are effectively
> removed from the broadcasting chain by absolute methods---TOTAL BANNING!!
>
> Any faulty LP audio is easily made usable by recording to a computer with
> one of the the pickup cartridge's stereo channels reversed at the
> cartridge.The result is then burned to a CD usually in MP3 format. Faulty
> commercial CD recordings however pose a problem which I don't quite know how
> to fix.
>
> Might I ask for opinions as to how we might proceed to fix this type of
> problem (unfortunately,always AFTER being broadcast)? We have Adobe Audition
> and other software but I am not sufficently computer (applications
> literate?) to know how to use these correctly.If any "special" software
> might be required,we have the funds.
>
> Another point that someone might clarify ,is there a test for absolute phase
> of any channel?All information gratefully received.
>
>
>
> Thanks for the read.
>
>
>
> Brian Goldsmith. 3GDR Melbourne.
>
>

If you're using a mixer with polarity switching on the inputs, your work is
easily done.

Ty Ford



-- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
stuff are at www.tyford.com
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 2:31:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

SSJVCmag <ten@nozirev.gamnocssj.com> wrote:
>
>This will Not work on things that have ONE element recorded badly in stereo
>with mis-matched polarity microphones. I have a 60's collection of Christmas
>stuff by Kostelanetz that has some key mic in the overall mix flopped and
>there's nothing you can do t fix the imaging...
>John Hiatt's recording of FEELS LIKE RAIN comes to mind which (I'm guessing)
>is a classic example of an open-back guitar amp mic'd front and rear
>WITHOUT flipping one of the mics and split hard-L/R. In stereo it just
>GRATES and in mono the guitar just nearly vanishes... What are these folks
>THINKING about?

This sort of thing was often done deliberately in the early stereo era,
when people were fascinated with neat stereo effects and not so concerned
about compatibility because they were doing separate mono mixes anyway.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 3:03:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in news:nNCdnS6sgKiRLWffRVn-
gA@comcast.com:

> To change the polarity of one channel, simply use Effects,
> Amplitude, Channel Mixer with the following settings:
> 100,0,-100,0
>
>

that would be 100,0 0,-100 otherwise the right channel will contain a copy
of the left which has been polarity reversed.

Easier to just move the cursor until It has an 'L' or 'R' next to it, and
double click. This selects the left or right channel. Then select 'Invert'
fom the effects menu.
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 3:03:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Forty Winks" <Yawn@bedtime.com> wrote in message
news:Xns96AF7A951DE51Yawnbedtime@84.92.1.10
> "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in
> news:nNCdnS6sgKiRLWffRVn- gA@comcast.com:
>
>> To change the polarity of one channel, simply use
>> Effects, Amplitude, Channel Mixer with the following
>> settings: 100,0,-100,0

Yup, this is wrong - right answer in the next paragraph

> that would be 100,0 0,-100 otherwise the right channel
> will contain a copy of the left which has been polarity
> reversed.

Oops, typo.

> Easier to just move the cursor until It has an 'L' or 'R'
> next to it, and double click. This selects the left or
> right channel. Then select 'Invert' fom the effects menu.

I considered that approach very carefully. It's how I'd do
it, but I'm not an Audition/CEP newbie.

I decided that the command route is easier to explain to
someone who is totally unfamiliar with the product.
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 11:52:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Brian Goldsmith" <brian.goldsmith@nospam.echo1.com.au> wrote in message
news:8BwKe.78793$oJ.22370@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
> Over some years of community broadcasting I have come across many cases of
> phase reversal of either the left or right channels of commercially
> recorded
> medium,LP or CD.Home made recordings ,irrespective of the medium
> ,immediately raise suspicions for obvious reasons and are effectively
> removed from the broadcasting chain by absolute methods---TOTAL BANNING!!
>
> Any faulty LP audio is easily made usable by recording to a computer with
> one of the the pickup cartridge's stereo channels reversed at the
> cartridge.The result is then burned to a CD usually in MP3 format. Faulty
> commercial CD recordings however pose a problem which I don't quite know
> how
> to fix.
>
> Might I ask for opinions as to how we might proceed to fix this type of
> problem (unfortunately,always AFTER being broadcast)? We have Adobe
> Audition
> and other software but I am not sufficently computer (applications
> literate?) to know how to use these correctly.If any "special" software
> might be required,we have the funds.
>
> Another point that someone might clarify ,is there a test for absolute
> phase
> of any channel?All information gratefully received.


Not a big problem that I've ever come across. Are you sure YOU haven't got
a faulty balanced lead somewhere in your chain ?

No more difficult to reverse the polarity of one channel of a CD than with
any other media. A bit trickier to do it after he broadcast though - you'd
have to go out and pry peoples' brains open.

geoff
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 11:52:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Geoff Wood" <geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote


>Not a big problem that I've ever come across.

*** I can assure you,while you may have never come across this problem and
you may not consider it a big problem,it is,none the less a problem that
occurs quite often.Perhaps you would like me to spell out chapter and verse
the details of the commercially available media that we have found the
problem in,both LP and CD?

>Are you sure YOU haven't got a faulty balanced lead somewhere in your
chain ?

****Of course I am sure,I dont post this sort of request lightly.Fifty years
of experience says I'm sure.


A bit trickier to do it after he broadcast though


**** Please look again at the original post:- " Might I ask for opinions as
to how we might proceed to fix this type of
problem (unfortunately,always AFTER being broadcast)".Does that not suggest
we might be looking to resurrect the original material so that it might be
broadcast in the future with the correct channel phasing?

Yours is a most unhelpful offering,quite unlike all of the other very
constructive points posted by a numbers of readers.

Brian Goldsmith,Station Engineer,3GDR,Melbourne.
Anonymous
August 12, 2005 4:44:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 10 Aug 2005 21:11:10 -0700, "Richard Crowley"
<rcrowley@xpr7t.net> wrote:

>IIRC, one of the Sheffield Labs direct-to-disc releases had a
>liner note recommending reversing the polarity of one of the
>channels(?)

Both channels, I think, but I'd have to research it
better to be confident. Possibly the Lincoln Mayorga v.2?

Early copies also had instructions to add treble to side
one, but not to side two, and to change the L/R balance
for some pressings.

Chris Hornbeck
Anonymous
August 12, 2005 10:39:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Brian Goldsmith" <brian.goldsmith@nospam.echo1.com.au> wrote:
>
> *** I can assure you,while you may have never come across this
> problem and you may not consider it a big problem,it is,none the less
> a problem that occurs quite often.Perhaps you would like me to spell
> out chapter and verse the details of the commercially available media
> that we have found the problem in,both LP and CD?

Sure, that would be great. Would you mind? Perhaps you deal with
material most of us have never heard, which could explain why the
problem seems to be more prevalent for you than those who have
responded.



>> Are you sure YOU haven't got a faulty balanced lead somewhere in
>> your chain ?
>
> ****Of course I am sure,I dont post this sort of request
> lightly.Fifty years of experience says I'm sure.

Wow, a little defensive there, aren't you? Geoff simply asked a
reasonable question that would really have to be considered in this
scenario. Given that several others have mentioned that they have not
shared your seemingly regular experience with this problem, it makes
sense to consider the possibility that the problem is occurring in the
air chain and not at the source.



> **** Please look again at the original post:- " Might I ask for
> opinions as to how we might proceed to fix this type of
> problem (unfortunately,always AFTER being broadcast)".Does that not
> suggest we might be looking to resurrect the original material so
> that it might be broadcast in the future with the correct channel
> phasing?

The wording apparently leaves room for misinterpretation. Many people
who replied to your post made comments about not being able to do
anything about the problem once it's broadcast.

Speaking of the problem, what is it, a phasing problem, or polarity
inversion?



> Yours is a most unhelpful offering,quite unlike all of the other very
> constructive points posted by a numbers of readers.

I don't know what it was about Geoff's post that set you off, but for
the record, I was going to recommend exploring the signal chain in-house
too. While I have no doubt that you may *occasionally* encounter a CD
or LP with one channel flipped, the experience of those responding here
seems to suggest that it's not all that common. Either your situation
is really unique, or the problem may not be where it seems to be.
Geoff's remarks were actually quite logical, based on what people have
written in this thread.

Unhelpfully yours with less than 50 years experience,
Lorin


--
"It CAN'T be too loud... some of the red lights aren't even on yet!"
- Lorin David Schultz
in the control room
making even bad news sound good

(Remove spamblock to reply)
Anonymous
August 12, 2005 11:59:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Brian Goldsmith" <brian.goldsmith@nospam.echo1.com.au> wrote in message
news:XeIKe.81175$oJ.17523@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
>
> "Geoff Wood" <geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote
>
>
>>Not a big problem that I've ever come across.
>
> *** I can assure you,while you may have never come across this problem and
> you may not consider it a big problem,it is,none the less a problem that
> occurs quite often.Perhaps you would like me to spell out chapter and
> verse
> the details of the commercially available media that we have found the
> problem in,both LP and CD?

That would certainly put a better context on your post, and allow your peers
to verify that it's not your imagination.
>
> Yours is a most unhelpful offering,quite unlike all of the other very
> constructive points posted by a numbers of readers.

So raising the possibily that your assertion that there is all this stuff
out there with out-of-phase channels just *could* be another problem is not
helpful. And that in a DAW single channel polarity reversal is equally
trivial, whether source is CD, LP, casstte, microphone, or whatever ?

As you like.

geoff

geoff
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 8:41:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Brian, by all means please do give us some examples of widely available
(if possible), commercially released CDs with one channel inverted. I
would like to check this out for myself.

--best regards
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 3:56:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 8/22/05 7:41 PM, in article
1124754060.436288.109470@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, "David Satz"
<DSatz@msn.com> wrote:

> Brian, by all means please do give us some examples of widely available
> (if possible), commercially released CDs with one channel inverted. I
> would like to check this out for myself.


Would one KEY element in an otherwise proper mix count?
John Hiatt's version of FEELS LIKE RAIN (slow clean quiet ballad) has the
entire arrangement based around a single electric guitar part that's
(assumedly) got the amp miced fore and aft without a polarity swap and just
vanishes in mono making the whole track pretty empty in mono.
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 3:56:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

SSJVCmag <ten@nozirev.gamnocssj.com> wrote:
>On 8/22/05 7:41 PM, in article
>1124754060.436288.109470@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, "David Satz"
><DSatz@msn.com> wrote:
>
>> Brian, by all means please do give us some examples of widely available
>> (if possible), commercially released CDs with one channel inverted. I
>> would like to check this out for myself.
>
>Would one KEY element in an otherwise proper mix count?
>John Hiatt's version of FEELS LIKE RAIN (slow clean quiet ballad) has the
>entire arrangement based around a single electric guitar part that's
>(assumedly) got the amp miced fore and aft without a polarity swap and just
>vanishes in mono making the whole track pretty empty in mono.

Yeah, but it's so airy and almost spooky in stereo.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 7:01:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 8/22/05 9:38 PM, in article dedumj$alf$1@panix2.panix.com, "Scott Dorsey"
<kludge@panix.com> wrote:

> SSJVCmag <ten@nozirev.gamnocssj.com> wrote:
>> On 8/22/05 7:41 PM, in article
>> 1124754060.436288.109470@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, "David Satz"
>> <DSatz@msn.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Brian, by all means please do give us some examples of widely available
>>> (if possible), commercially released CDs with one channel inverted. I
>>> would like to check this out for myself.
>>
>> Would one KEY element in an otherwise proper mix count?
>> John Hiatt's version of FEELS LIKE RAIN (slow clean quiet ballad) has the
>> entire arrangement based around a single electric guitar part that's
>> (assumedly) got the amp miced fore and aft without a polarity swap and just
>> vanishes in mono making the whole track pretty empty in mono.
>
> Yeah, but it's so airy and almost spooky in stereo.

Not this track!
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 6:29:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <1124754060.436288.109470@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com> DSatz@msn.com writes:

> Brian, by all means please do give us some examples of widely available
> (if possible), commercially released CDs with one channel inverted.

I believe the first Highwoods String Band record, which was recored
outdoors, with an X-Y pair, had a channel inverted. But that's not
exactly a CD, though it was a commercially released LP about 35 years
ago.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 10:02:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <znr1124756434k@trad> mrivers@d-and-d.com (that's me!) writes:

> I believe the first Highwoods String Band record, which was recored
> outdoors, with an X-Y pair, had a channel inverted.

Or maybe it was the first Canturbury Orchestra LP. Too far back in the
stack to check now.

--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mrivers@d-and-d.com)
However, until the spam goes away or Hell freezes over,
lots of IP addresses are blocked from this system. If
you e-mail me and it bounces, use your secret decoder ring
and reach me here: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo
!