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Anonymous
August 11, 2005 11:14:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hope this isn't too OT. I am a huge Bruce Hornsby fan and would love to know
if anyone here has any idea what drum machine he used on The Way it Is, and
a few other tracks from his early days (Show Goes On, Every Lile Kiss) . I
love the drum sound and would love to use it on one of my own tracks. I
guess it could have been some early form and sample or sample and hold
technology but I'm thinking not.

Be fascinated to see if anyone knows.

Cheers,

H.

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Anonymous
August 11, 2005 11:14:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

H wrote:
> Hope this isn't too OT. I am a huge Bruce Hornsby fan and would love to know
> if anyone here has any idea what drum machine he used on The Way it Is, and
> a few other tracks from his early days (Show Goes On, Every Lile Kiss) . I
> love the drum sound and would love to use it on one of my own tracks. I
> guess it could have been some early form and sample or sample and hold
> technology but I'm thinking not.
>
> Be fascinated to see if anyone knows.
>
> Cheers,
>
> H.
>
>

At the time, there were two machines I know of that would produce such good sounds: The SP12 and the
Linn 9000.

Gary Moore used the Linn machine on his album that had "Over the Hills and Far Away" on it and that
sounded quite "real" to me.

However, I could be wrong.

--fletch
Anonymous
August 11, 2005 11:14:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

H <hproductions@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:
>Hope this isn't too OT. I am a huge Bruce Hornsby fan and would love to know
>if anyone here has any idea what drum machine he used on The Way it Is, and
>a few other tracks from his early days (Show Goes On, Every Lile Kiss) . I
>love the drum sound and would love to use it on one of my own tracks. I
>guess it could have been some early form and sample or sample and hold
>technology but I'm thinking not.

I don't know offhand... the early stuff of his that I know of was mostly
done with real drums. But send a letter to brucefanmail @ aol.com and ask
him. Yes, it's read by one of his droogs, but they actually do pass the
questions on to Bruce.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
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Anonymous
August 12, 2005 8:44:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Definitly it was a Linn.
Also used by Don Henley
kevin
Anonymous
August 12, 2005 3:22:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>
> I don't know offhand... the early stuff of his that I know of was mostly
> done with real drums. But send a letter to brucefanmail @ aol.com and ask
> him. Yes, it's read by one of his droogs, but they actually do pass the
> questions on to Bruce.
> --scott
>
>
> --
> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

"Droog?"
Anonymous
August 12, 2005 3:22:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mark Hitchmough" wrote ...
> >
>> I don't know offhand... the early stuff of his that I know
>> of was mostly done with real drums. But send a letter
>> to brucefanmail @ aol.com and ask him. Yes, it's read
>> by one of his droogs, but they actually do pass the
>> questions on to Bruce.
>> --scott
>> --
>> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
>
> "Droog?"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nadsat
Anonymous
August 13, 2005 12:47:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> > Yes, it's read by one of his droogs, but they actually do pass the
> > questions on to Bruce.

> "Droog?"


What a great word!
!