Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Power Conditioners-Battery Back-Up Units?

Last response: in Components
Share
August 30, 2003 10:47:28 PM

Looking for recommendations for a good power conditioner & battery back-up (surge surpressor). After lightening fried my last computer - I want to protect this new one. Any recommendations as to how to protect a cable connection - the cable modem took the hit too - but I'm not sure how the surge got to the system - power or cable, who knows.

Anyway - would appreciate recommendations.



<b><font color=red>I did NOT have sex with that woman, Miss Lewinsky ... - Bill "Cigar Man" Clinton</font color=red><b>
August 31, 2003 9:29:35 PM

Bump - I really need some good, timely recommendations. (Sorry for the bump)



<b><font color=red>I did NOT have sex with that woman, Miss Lewinsky ... - Bill "Cigar Man" Clinton</font color=red><b>
September 1, 2003 12:22:10 AM

Hope you don't mind me posting some general info for people. You get a bump

<A HREF="http://www.webtechgeek.com/How2-Choose-an-Uninterruptib..." target="_new"> How to Choose </A>
Quote:

There are basically three types of UPSs: Standby, Line-interactive, and On-line.

Standby: (sometimes called "off-line") With this type of power supply, power comes directly from the A/C outlet until the voltage sags or the power fails. After the power sags or fails, a battery powered inverter almost immediately turns on to continue to supply you with power. Batteries are charged, as necessary, when direct A/C power is available. Even while power is coming directly from the A/C outlet, the UPS provides protection from voltage spikes and surges. Standby units are the low cost solution in the UPS family.

Line-interactive: Just like the standby units, line-interactive UPSs provide protection from spikes and surges, as well as supplying auxiliary power if a voltage sag or a blackout occurs. Unlike the standby units, line-interactive UPSs provide automatic voltage boost when the power dips, without accessing the batteries. This feature provides continuous lined conditioning, promotes longer battery life, and eliminates electronic "noise" that can cause minor application errors and loss of data.

On-line: On-line UPSs provide the highest quality of power protection by using a double-conversion technique. The UPS takes the incoming A/C power and recreates it by converting the voltage to D/C, then conditioning the power to eliminate noise, sags, or surges, and, finally, converting it back to A/C before it exists the UPS. Since the power runs continuously through the inverter, there is no transfer or switching time to battery mode in the event of a blackout. Remember to come back to WebTechGeek.com for more How~2 tips!


The loving are the daring!
Related resources
September 1, 2003 2:14:31 AM

No problem - good information. I want one good option #3.



<b><font color=red>I did NOT have sex with that woman, Miss Lewinsky ... - Bill "Cigar Man" Clinton</font color=red><b>
September 1, 2003 8:57:40 AM

I know apc makes some good line conditioners and battery backups. Some of the better ones also have lan port connections in them, that you plug your ethernet into the ups, then it routes it out to whatever,

I would highly suggest going to www.apc.com and just reading some of their information on their products. If you want the best, get apc. They're a proven company and their products won't fail. However, be advised, you will pay a premium for the protection you want.

-fiask0-
September 2, 2003 12:31:47 AM

Took your advice and bought an APC XS1000 - a bit of overkill I know, but was on sale for $100, and since I just had a computer fried by lightening - I spent the money. It's an On-line battery back up and power conditioner - and a $150,000 ins policy.

<b><font color=red>I did NOT have sex with that woman, Miss Lewinsky ... - Bill "Cigar Man" Clinton</font color=red><b>
!