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Small diameter condensers for guitar....?

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Anonymous
August 29, 2005 9:45:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Small-diameter condenser mics for recording guitar...

Hello all -

I'm thinking about buying a small-diameter condenser mic to add to my [small]
collection of mics I use for non-commerical home recording.

It will be used to record dreadnought-sized guitars, also mandolin and perhaps
banjo (though I've heard that a large-diameter condenser works best for
banjo), in a simple home environment. I use a Mac g4, a Presonus Firebox (has
nice solid-state preamps, is not a tube-type pre), and Cubase.

I don't want an overly-bright mic, but rather seek detail, and warmth in the midrange.

The mics I'm considering:
Audio Technica Pro-37r
Audio Technica ATM33a
Audio Technica AE5100
Audio Technica AT3031

I've got another AT mic (AT2020) that seems to be a very good performer for
the money.

Any comments regarding one or more of the above?

Any others in the $100-250 price range worth considering?

Thanks,
- John
Anonymous
August 29, 2005 9:45:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Also consider:
oktava mk012
MLX 603e
The later is brighter but I have found on a Martin HD28 it is the best.
On a taylor 614 I think the oktava is better in most cases. Both or
these are on the cheap.
Anonymous
August 29, 2005 9:45:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"John Albert" <j.albert@snet.net> wrote in message
news:431349AE.35F31C1B@snet.net
> Small-diameter condenser mics for recording guitar...


> I don't want an overly-bright mic, but rather seek
> detail, and warmth in the midrange.

> The mics I'm considering:
> Audio Technica Pro-37r

I inherited two of these from the previous sound guy at
church. They are well-known for their coldness and
roughness.
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Anonymous
August 29, 2005 11:22:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 8/29/05 1:45 PM, in article 431349AE.35F31C1B@snet.net, "John Albert"
<j.albert@snet.net> wrote:

> Small-diameter condenser mics for recording guitar...

> The mics I'm considering:
> Audio Technica Pro-37r
> Audio Technica ATM33a
> Audio Technica AE5100
> Audio Technica AT3031
>
> I've got another AT mic (AT2020) that seems to be a very good performer for
> the money.
>
> Any comments regarding one or more of the above?
>
> Any others in the $100-250 price range worth considering?

AKG C535

SHURE Sm81
Anonymous
August 30, 2005 12:45:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> I don't want an overly-bright mic, but rather seek detail, and warmth in
the midrange.
>
> The mics I'm considering:
> Audio Technica Pro-37r
> Audio Technica ATM33a
> Audio Technica AE5100
> Audio Technica AT3031

AT's are known for their crisp top-end, and not for a warm midrange. Rode
NT5 is the mic you describe, but they're $400 for a pair and aren't sold
individually.
Anonymous
August 30, 2005 10:27:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Danny Taddei" <palmtreedreamer@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1125340366.693742.5050@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com
> Also consider:
> oktava mk012
> MLX 603e

I have a number of MXL 603s that do yoeman duty. It's a
fairly warm sensitive mic that I've used (with a pop filter
and attenuation) for vocals, for instruments like guitars,
and in the form of both spaced and coincident pairs, for
area pickup. It's a fat cardioid with less than average
proximity effect.
Anonymous
August 30, 2005 10:55:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Zigakly" <no@no.no> wrote in message
news:D f0a62$grg$1@domitilla.aioe.org...
> > I don't want an overly-bright mic, but rather seek detail, and warmth in
> the midrange.
> >
> > The mics I'm considering:
> > Audio Technica Pro-37r
> > Audio Technica ATM33a
> > Audio Technica AE5100
> > Audio Technica AT3031
>
> AT's are known for their crisp top-end, and not for a warm midrange. Rode
> NT5 is the mic you describe, but they're $400 for a pair and aren't sold
> individually.

For some dreadnoughts (notably Taylors) the Oktava MC012 is nice. In my
experience they get along less well with Martins; for those, usually, I like
a large diaphragm.

On the other hand, contrary to what you've heard, my preference is almost
universally for a small diaphragm on banjos. Usually the MC012 is nice
there, especially with the hypercardioid capsule.

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
August 31, 2005 4:53:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 29 Aug 2005 17:45:18 GMT, John Albert <j.albert@snet.net>
wrote:

>Small-diameter condenser mics for recording guitar...
>
>Hello all -
>
>I'm thinking about buying a small-diameter condenser mic to add to my [small]
>collection of mics I use for non-commerical home recording.
>
>It will be used to record dreadnought-sized guitars, also mandolin and perhaps
>banjo (though I've heard that a large-diameter condenser works best for
>banjo), in a simple home environment. I use a Mac g4, a Presonus Firebox (has
>nice solid-state preamps, is not a tube-type pre), and Cubase.
>
>I don't want an overly-bright mic, but rather seek detail, and warmth in the midrange.
>
>The mics I'm considering:
> Audio Technica Pro-37r
> Audio Technica ATM33a
> Audio Technica AE5100
> Audio Technica AT3031
>
>I've got another AT mic (AT2020) that seems to be a very good performer for
>the money.
>
>Any comments regarding one or more of the above?
>
>Any others in the $100-250 price range worth considering?
>
>Thanks,
>- John


Of the ones you mention, I'm only familiar with the AE5100 which is a
pretty decent mic. I think Ty Ford has commented on these from time
to time in this NG. I have one but it tends to get loaned out a lot
and I use others. Worth auditioning.

For the amount you mention, with a little patience you should be able
to pick up a used AT-4051a or AT-4053a on e-bay. Loads better than
any of those you mention. Do a google search in this NG for those
mics and you will see quite a few laudatory comments. Much more even
response than some of the less expensive SD mics. These can play with
the Neumann KM140s and Josephson mics. I think they are less bright
than either the KM140 or the C42 if that is what you are looking for.
I havepairs of both AT mics as well as the Josephson C42s (which are
very nice, but outside your pricing) and am quite happy with them.
You can check out a review of better SDs here to give you more basis
for comparison:

http://emusician.com/mics/emusic_smokin_condensers/

Another possibility if you can find one is a Beyer MCE 93 (or 94).
Nice, clean, useful SD that never caught on here in the states as far
as I can tell. They show up on E-Bay from time to time. I think they
listed at @$400 each, but I have a couple pairs that I picked up for
@$75-125 each on E-Bay. No one here knows what they are so no one
bids on them. The MCE94 will take a battery for phantom power.
There is a review here:
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jun99/articles/beyermce...


Other decent alternatives include the previously mentioned AKG c535eb,
which is also a decent vocal mic should you want to use it for that
purpose as well. The Groove Tubes GT-44 or AM-40 (same mic, different
distributors) is great acoustic guitar condenser mic. It is a tube
mic and is a bit warmer than the other mics mentioned so far. Nice
detail with this mic. I have a couple of these also. It is really a
mid sized diaphragm mic (3/4" I believe). Banjo Mart was blowing them
out for $200 earlier this year. They were once about $800 list. They
show up on E-bay fairly frequently and typically go for @$250 or so.
A real sleeper IMNHO.

Have fun!
Anonymous
September 1, 2005 6:56:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <431349AE.35F31C1B@snet.net>,
John Albert <j.albert@snet.net> wrote:

> Small-diameter condenser mics for recording guitar...
>
> Hello all -
>
> I'm thinking about buying a small-diameter condenser mic to add to my [small]
> collection of mics I use for non-commerical home recording.
>
> It will be used to record dreadnought-sized guitars, also mandolin and
> perhaps
> banjo (though I've heard that a large-diameter condenser works best for
> banjo), in a simple home environment. I use a Mac g4, a Presonus Firebox (has
> nice solid-state preamps, is not a tube-type pre), and Cubase.
>
> I don't want an overly-bright mic, but rather seek detail, and warmth in the
> midrange.
>
> The mics I'm considering:
> Audio Technica Pro-37r
> Audio Technica ATM33a
> Audio Technica AE5100
> Audio Technica AT3031
>
> I've got another AT mic (AT2020) that seems to be a very good performer for
> the money.
>
> Any comments regarding one or more of the above?
>
> Any others in the $100-250 price range worth considering?
>
> Thanks,
> - John



It ain't small, and it ain't a condenser, but it is very close to your
price range, and I love mine for the uses you list: EV re-20.





David Correia
www.Celebrationsound.com
September 7, 2005 10:06:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Well I have a small collection, so here's my experience.
2 AKG 451EB
2 Marshall 603s
2 AT 4041
2 Josephson C42
1 Octava MC012

I tend to use the MC012 on Hyper at the neck and a AT 4050 behind the
bridge at the body for a big stereo sound.
Otherwise I like the MC012 in omni at the neck or even close to the
sound hole for a mono sound.
The Marshall and Josephson work great as well, the MXL (Marshall) is
very similar in sound to the Octava in cardioids.
The AKG 451 or AT 4041 get used if I want the guitar to have an
aggressive forward sound.
!