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Mixing Board Options

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Anonymous
September 1, 2005 8:59:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I have a lot of of audio source inputs (20-30) and I have a lot of
little mac mini computers on which I will record the audio sources in
QuickTime for distribution via an Intranet. I want to put something in
between to manage the sound quality. By this point t should be clear to
everyone reading this message that I am clueless. What do I need to do
this so I can clean up messy signals, boost low-volume signals, tone
down hot signals, etc. and then send it on to the mac for QuickTime
recording? Uh, a mixing board? Help.

Thanks

evan

More about : mixing board options

Anonymous
September 2, 2005 6:34:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Um, yes, a "mixer" would probably work for this. But you are a bit
vague. What type of sources? Do each go to their own recording
track, or do groups go to sets of stereo tracks? Do you need to use a
single source on two computers?

If you want 1-to-1 recording, any mixer with inserts will work if you
short the insert to itself (connecting the tip and ring, preferably
with some resistance) or with direct outs (you can only control the
gain, but that sounds OK for your needs). If this is the case, lots
of small mixers will work as well as a one giant one, and may be
easier to manage. If you are recording groups to descrete tracks,
then you need either a lot of mixers (one per computer) or a mixer
with a lot of subgroups (2 per each computer after the first). If you
need a single source to feed two computers, you either need to go the
large mixer rout or split the signal.

As far as consoles, I'm assuming that this isn't going to be
extrordinarily professional, and a cheaper console will work. If
you're leaving this in one place and don't plan on abusing it, a
Behringer console may be your cheapest option. The MX9000 is a large
console with some features you may apreciate:

Meter bridge to meter every channel indevidually.
Direct outs and inserts on every channel
24 base channels with ability to use the second main mix (b-mix)
inputs as additional 24 channels (so 48 total). Note that b-mix
inputs must be line-level.
An additional 3 stereo aux ins
6 possible stereo output roughting options (main mix + b mix + 8
subgroups)
Additional 6 aux sends, all switchable pre and post (bringing the
total of mono output posibilities to 18 without using direct outs or
inserts)
Flexible roughting
Can be obtained for close to $1000US.

This is, by no means, your only option. I have worked on this
console, though, and like it. Be aware that Behringer products aren't
the most durable, so don't get it if you plan on moving it a lot.


On 1 Sep 2005 16:59:53 -0700, "five4fighting" <evanleeson@gmail.com>
wrote:

>I have a lot of of audio source inputs (20-30) and I have a lot of
>little mac mini computers on which I will record the audio sources in
>QuickTime for distribution via an Intranet. I want to put something in
>between to manage the sound quality. By this point t should be clear to
>everyone reading this message that I am clueless. What do I need to do
>this so I can clean up messy signals, boost low-volume signals, tone
>down hot signals, etc. and then send it on to the mac for QuickTime
>recording? Uh, a mixing board? Help.
>
>Thanks
>
>evan
Anonymous
September 2, 2005 7:51:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

five4fighting wrote:

> I have a lot of of audio source inputs (20-30) and I have a lot of
> little mac mini computers on which I will record the audio sources in
> QuickTime for distribution via an Intranet. I want to put something in
> between to manage the sound quality. By this point t should be clear to
> everyone reading this message that I am clueless. What do I need to do
> this so I can clean up messy signals, boost low-volume signals, tone
> down hot signals, etc. and then send it on to the mac for QuickTime
> recording? Uh, a mixing board? Help.

You just want something basic to adust level, connect a few sources and EQ
it a bit if required ?

I'll recommend this...

http://www.studiomaster.com/c1.html

but there's plenty other similar stuff out there. Best to avoid those with
obviously Chinese names btw. They may be cheap but European / American
designed gear is usually better designed.

Graham
Related resources
Anonymous
September 2, 2005 11:32:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"five4fighting" <evanleeson@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1125619193.871548.133860@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com

> I have a lot of of audio source inputs (20-30) and I have
> a lot of little mac mini computers on which I will record
> the audio sources in QuickTime for distribution via an
> Intranet. I want to put something in between to manage
> the sound quality.

Probably a bad idea.

> By this point t should be clear to
> everyone reading this message that I am clueless. What do
> I need to do this so I can clean up messy signals, boost
> low-volume signals, tone down hot signals, etc. and then
> send it on to the mac for QuickTime recording?

Your best tools for those purposes are probably composed of
software running on the Mac.

> Uh, a mixing board? Help.

Most mixing boards have many inputs and a few outputs that
you have much control over. It seems like you are looking
for a many-to-many relationship. One example of a common
audio device that manages many-to-many relationships is
called a patch panel, but all it does is route signals. You
may want to look into one.
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 8:35:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"five4fighting" <evanleeson@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1125619193.871548.133860@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

> I have a lot of of audio source inputs (20-30)

What kind of audio sources are they? Are they microphones or line level or
what? It makes quite a difference. Are they mono or stereo sources?

> and I have a lot of
> little mac mini computers on which I will record the audio sources in
> QuickTime for distribution via an Intranet.

How many mac mini computers are there? How many sources can each computer
record at a time? Do the audio sources need to be recorded separately, or
are several sources mixed together for each recording? Do you need to be
able to record all audio sources at once, or just a few at a time?

> I want to put something in
> between to manage the sound quality. By this point t should be clear to
> everyone reading this message that I am clueless. What do I need to do
> this so I can clean up messy signals, boost low-volume signals, tone
> down hot signals, etc. and then send it on to the mac for QuickTime
> recording? Uh, a mixing board? Help.

Do the signal characteristics for each source change, so you continually
need to adjust settings? Or is it the case that once set up, the settings
remain fixed?

The cheapest and most versatile option would be to do all the work on the
mac mini computers, as Arny suggested. However, if you have more sources
than computers, this may mean changing the computer recording parameters
every time you switch sources.

If the sources are line level stereo, you could get a number of line mixers
such as the Behringer RX1602. This will cost about $15 per stereo source,
excluding cables. You'd connect up to eight stereo sources to each line
mixer; however, each line mixer has only one stereo output, so you could
only record one signal at a time for each set of eight inputs.

If that's inadequate, you can use standard mixers, which will have a number
of output channels. This costs quite a bit more ... for example, the
Behringer UB2442FX-PRO has ten direct outs, plus four group outs, plus two
main outs(*). So it could handle eight stereo sources, delivering eight
stereo outputs, at a cost of $45 per stereo source excluding cables.
(Standard mixers can handle microphone inputs as well as line level inputs)

But suppose you didn't have one mac mini per stereo source. Suppose, for
example, you only have ten computers, and you have 24 sources. You install
three UB2442FX-PRO mixers, for 1000 dollars; and you connect the mixers' 24
stereo outputs to a patch bay (60 dollars). You connect your computers to
the patch bay too, and use patch connectors to connect the desired stereo
output to each computer.

Don't forget to budget for the cables. They cost quite a lot because there
are so many of them.

Tim

(*) many mixers also have aux outs, so you can squeeze some extra few
outputs.
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 6:58:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks. This is helptful and encouraging. My situation is that I need
to do a lot of one-to-one. One feed will come into the mixer and go out
to a computer. I see what you mean that many small mixers might work
better, but I'd like to be able to consolidate and switch input/output
pairings so I can use any given computer to record any given source.
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 7:01:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks for the tips. I appreciate the response.
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 7:03:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

This sounds more like what I'm looking for, though I would like to
adjust line levels and play with quality before it gets tot he
computer. I want to keep the recording options on the computer side as
standard as possible so I can increase reliability. The computers run
custom software to start, stop and save recordings on a schedule as
well as move them over the Internet.

Thanks.
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 7:16:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Tim, your last scenario is what I want, I think.

Line level feeds of radio stations I believe they are mono.

Eventually there will be as many minimacs as we need to record all the
sources. I want to limit the recording to one source per computer for
stability's sake. (Currently we are recording multiples on PCs and they
are unstable to the point of requiring constant babying. Not a good
situation. I use expensive multichannel sound cards inside the PC with
software mixing and It just isn't reliable enough and the quality is
poor. Too much EM inside the computer, I think. Plus Windows simply
blows chunks in general) All sources will need to be recorded on an
ongoing basis on a schedule. Again, I am matching one feed to one
computer, but I may have more sources than computers so a feed might
have to get sent to a different computer for recording and I'm hoping
to avoid swapping cable all the time. The signal characteristics change
since there are a lot of variables that affect quality of transmission
at the source, over the air and via satellite.

Thanks, and thanks to everyone on the forum who replied. My life is
going to be much simpler now.
!