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How many here have and use chess CT-ART 3.0 ?

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Anonymous
May 19, 2005 12:13:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

Has it improved your OTB game any? How often do you use it?

I appreciate your help.

It seems that the posts with the most replies are the controversial ones.
This one is not. lol

John

More about : chess art

Anonymous
May 19, 2005 12:16:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

>Has it improved your OTB game any?

Definitely.

>How often do you use it?

Not as often as I should like. GM Susan Polgar has said that she
studies tactics every day, which seems not to have harmed her game....

Best
Mark
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 6:09:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

Amos,

>The concept of a program like CT-ART sounds good, and I have no doubt
it is
of some value. I own it and like it. However, IMO, the biggest problem
with
programs like CT-ART is that with each exercise you know a tactical
possibility exists and you spend time looking for it. In a real game
this is
not the case.

This is an excellent point, and it highlights a problem which most of
us (i.e. Class Players) face when trying to form a plan, much less to
identify plausible candidate moves.

>If you spent two or three minutes on every move ((beyond the
opening) ) in a real game looking for a tactical shot, you would almost

always lose on time unless you had long time controls. However, with
CT-ART
you can afford to spend that kind of time because you know for certain
a
tactic exists somewhere.

Yes. It seems to me that the real benefit of CT-ART 3.0, and indeed of
books on tactics, is that it's a method of learning the specific
tactical *patterns* inherent in every opening. If a five-move tactic is
there, and *you already know it*, then you can play it without having
to spend *any* time...

>Where I have found CT-ART most useful is in learning various chess
patterns/positions than lend themselves to tactics.

Indeed.

Can you think of any opening which contains *no* tactics?

Thanks for your post.

Mark
Related resources
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 9:01:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

Mark,

The concept of a program like CT-ART sounds good, and I have no doubt it is
of some value. I own it and like it. However, IMO, the biggest problem with
programs like CT-ART is that with each exercise you know a tactical
possibility exists and you spend time looking for it. In a real game this is
not the case. If you spent two or three minutes on every move ((beyond the
opening) ) in a real game looking for a tactical shot, you would almost
always lose on time unless you had long time controls. However, with CT-ART
you can afford to spend that kind of time because you know for certain a
tactic exists somewhere.

Where I have found CT-ART most useful is in learning various chess
patterns/positions than lend themselves to tactics.

"Mark Houlsby" <mark.houlsby@eudoramail.com> wrote in message
news:1116515814.927865.47930@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >Has it improved your OTB game any?
>
> Definitely.
>
>>How often do you use it?
>
> Not as often as I should like. GM Susan Polgar has said that she
> studies tactics every day, which seems not to have harmed her game....
>
> Best
> Mark
>
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 5:27:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

"Amos J. Soma" <amos_j_soma@yahoo.com> skrev i melding
news:TIudnchabd0pYxHfRVn-ow@buckeye-express.com...
> Mark,
>
> The concept of a program like CT-ART sounds good, and I have no doubt it
is
> of some value. I own it and like it. However, IMO, the biggest problem
with
> programs like CT-ART is that with each exercise you know a tactical
> possibility exists and you spend time looking for it. In a real game this
is
> not the case. If you spent two or three minutes on every move ((beyond the
> opening) ) in a real game looking for a tactical shot, you would almost
> always lose on time unless you had long time controls. However, with
CT-ART
> you can afford to spend that kind of time because you know for certain a
> tactic exists somewhere.
>
> Where I have found CT-ART most useful is in learning various chess
> patterns/positions than lend themselves to tactics.

This latest is where you learn where in the game you start to look for
combinations so that you don't waste time in a not tactical position or ...
For CT-Art this could maybe be grade 1-3(4) for the average player.

But I think it is important too to work with harder problems (4+) to learn
how to calculate accurate. For this I find CT-Art very useful since you have
to play all the moves along the path to the victory. Even when there is no
material to gain, there is a need to calculate accurate, the score is maybe
below a pawn at the end but you still don't want to miss a killer reply from
your opponent. Of course it's harder to evaluate the board at the end of the
path when the difference between several path are maybe only 1/4 of a pawn
but it is a bit on the road to calculate accurate. To go further the Stoyko
Exercises could help (searh Dan Heisman's site for explaination).

Odd Gunnar
May 20, 2005 8:02:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

I just ordered the version for Pocket PC. Haven't received it yet.

In principle it doesn't sound much different than working from a PGN
collection of puzzles or a tactics book.

I am fond of the 1001 Brilliant Ways to Checkmate and 1001 Winning
Sacrifices and Combinations, both of which are available in PGN form if
you look hard enough.

Working with Puzzle books has definitely improved my play.


John J. wrote:
> Has it improved your OTB game any? How often do you use it?
>
> I appreciate your help.
>
> It seems that the posts with the most replies are the controversial ones.
> This one is not. lol
>
> John
>
>
!