Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

multiple soundcards

Last response: in Home Audio
Share
Anonymous
September 16, 2005 3:11:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I want to run two soundcards so that I can get 4 tracks simultaneous
recoring or have one card play back while the second records. But when
I install the second soundcard I get all kinds of conflicts and neither
card works. Any idea how to get this to work? I have a 900MhZ athlon
running XP.

More about : multiple soundcards

Anonymous
September 16, 2005 4:08:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

What sound cards are you using? If you want to have the 4 tracks in
sync (or maybe even work at all as your finding) you'll need to use a
card that is designed to be used in multiple card installation like the
Marian. Or probably it's just easier to buy a multiple I/O card.
Anonymous
September 16, 2005 6:11:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Natalie Drest wrote:
> I want to run two soundcards so that I can get 4 tracks simultaneous
> recoring or have one card play back while the second records. But when
> I install the second soundcard I get all kinds of conflicts and neither
> card works. Any idea how to get this to work? I have a 900MhZ athlon
> running XP.

This will not work unless you can syncronize the clock of one card to
the clock of the other. Even if you manage to resolve the conflicts,
you will find that the cards will not synchronize properly with each
other because of deviations in their respective crystals, either
resulting in buffer overflows or buffer underruns.

You may want to get a soundcard that has multiple (virtual) channels
such as the echo mia (midi) or echo gina. This will most likely solve
both your conflicts and the synchronization problem.
Related resources
Anonymous
September 16, 2005 8:01:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Natalie Drest wrote:
> I want to run two soundcards so that I can get 4 tracks simultaneous
> recoring or have one card play back while the second records. But when
> I install the second soundcard I get all kinds of conflicts and neither
> card works. Any idea how to get this to work?

XP makes it very difficult to resolve IRQ conflicts. You could go back
to Win98. But getting "duplex" operation this way is going to be a big
headache anyway. Turtle Beach made a line of cards about ten years ago
that had a sync connection so that you could install two of them for
four tracks, but you don't want ten year old sound cards. (or is that
what you're trying to use?)

Spend the money. Buy what you need. It's all good.
Anonymous
September 16, 2005 12:43:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Natalie Drest" <charlystuangstabilack@yahoo.com> wrote in
message
news:1126851101.414944.149270@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com

> I want to run two soundcards so that I can get 4 tracks
> simultaneous recoring or have one card play back while
> the second records. But when I install the second
> soundcard I get all kinds of conflicts and neither card
> works. Any idea how to get this to work? I have a
> 900MhZ athlon running XP.

If you want to run multiple cards, you have to pick the
right cards and install and configure them the right way.
For example, I use 4 M-Audio Delta cards in the same PC to
record up to 36 concurrent channels. I use three different
model cards, so two are identical.
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 3:11:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

How about this one:
http://www.digitalaudio.com/DIGITALAUDIO/myarticles.asp...

dave


"Natalie Drest" <charlystuangstabilack@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1126851101.414944.149270@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>I want to run two soundcards so that I can get 4 tracks simultaneous
> recoring or have one card play back while the second records. But when
> I install the second soundcard I get all kinds of conflicts and neither
> card works. Any idea how to get this to work? I have a 900MhZ athlon
> running XP.
>
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 3:11:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Dave Morrison" <davemor@knology.net> wrote in message
news:37fb4$432b8956$18600968$8971@KNOLOGY.NET...
> How about this one:
> http://www.digitalaudio.com/DIGITALAUDIO/myarticles.asp...
>
> dave
>
>

Let me put in a plug for Digital Audio Labs. I've used a CardD, a Digital
Only, and now a CardDeluxe. The sound quality is superb, but what really
sets this company apart is their support. It is second to none. I've had
two occasions, when I was having problems with a DAW using a DAL card. In
the first case a few years ago it turned out not to be a problem with the
audio card or its driver. It was a motherboard problem. I'm currently
trying to sort out a problem with a new computer. I cannot get either a DAL
CardDeluxe or an Echo Mia card to install on this machine. So far, only DAL
has provided substantive help. Abit, the motherboard manufacturer, spent
phone time with me but the tech, whose accent made communication extremely
difficult, was a bit clueless. VIA, the chipset maker, has yet to respond
to an e-mail. Same with Echo. On the other hand, an e-mail to Digital
Audio Labs was answered within a couple of hours. That exchange was
followed by several others each with substantive diagnostic suggestions that
seem to point to a PCI bus problem. (If anyone is interested I'll report
the final outcome.) I have no interest in DAL other than as a customer
amazed that very old fashioned customer service is alive a well in
Minnesota.

Steve King
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 9:31:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Steve King wrote:

> Let me put in a plug for Digital Audio Labs.

.. . . . and all of the other failrly good quality sound cards that have
been mentioned in this thread.

But let's take an imaginary look at the original poster (who of course
none of us know, really). The question suggests someone who is either
not aware of the exisitance of multi-channel audio interfaces, or is
aware of them, doesn't want to spend that much money, but knows that
"Sound-blaster" grade sound cards can be had by the truckload through
eBay sources for $10 or so. So why not buy four of them and make an
8-channel recorded/player? Why are all of those idiots paying $500 for
their MOTUs and Deltas, or $250 for their DAL cards?

Read between the lines. The real answer to the real question behind the
question is "no, unless you're a serious
experimenter/programmer/computer geek."




I've used a CardD, a Digital
> Only, and now a CardDeluxe. The sound quality is superb, but what really
> sets this company apart is their support. It is second to none. I've had
> two occasions, when I was having problems with a DAW using a DAL card. In
> the first case a few years ago it turned out not to be a problem with the
> audio card or its driver. It was a motherboard problem. I'm currently
> trying to sort out a problem with a new computer. I cannot get either a DAL
> CardDeluxe or an Echo Mia card to install on this machine. So far, only DAL
> has provided substantive help. Abit, the motherboard manufacturer, spent
> phone time with me but the tech, whose accent made communication extremely
> difficult, was a bit clueless. VIA, the chipset maker, has yet to respond
> to an e-mail. Same with Echo. On the other hand, an e-mail to Digital
> Audio Labs was answered within a couple of hours. That exchange was
> followed by several others each with substantive diagnostic suggestions that
> seem to point to a PCI bus problem. (If anyone is interested I'll report
> the final outcome.) I have no interest in DAL other than as a customer
> amazed that very old fashioned customer service is alive a well in
> Minnesota.
>
> Steve King
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 3:01:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

TaffJock wrote:

> What sound cards are you using? If you want to have the 4 tracks in
> sync (or maybe even work at all as your finding) you'll need to use a
> card that is designed to be used in multiple card installation like the
> Marian. Or probably it's just easier to buy a multiple I/O card.

They're probably trying to get away with several cheap cards.
I had this bright idea once, about 2 years ago, but recognising the sync
problems, I came up with a novel solution.

My plan was to get multiple AD1848-type cards and a machine with
4 ISA slots. I would then write custom 8-track record/playback software,
driving the cards directly in DOS, and using PIO mode rather than DMA.
With all the card I/O running from the timer interrupt at 44KHz, all the
timing issues should have been negated by the fact that the PC was acting
as a single clock for all four cards and the on-board crystals would be
essentially bypassed.

I began with writing playback code first, as a proof-of-concept before
worrying about the recording side, and I stuck with one card on the machine
I was using for development.
The fatal problem was that to actually store the recording it would need to
be streamed to disk, and each time you did disk I/O, DOS would disable the
timer interrupts to prevent anything from screwing it up while it was
accessing the filesystem. This of course halted the soundcard I/O while it
did the disk access, resulting in a continuous stuttering sound.

I still wonder if it might have worked using a network drive instead, or
possibly using Linux instead of DOS as the underlying OS.
I got a TSR-8 instead.

--
JP Morris - aka DOUG the Eagle (Dragon) -=UDIC=- jpm@it-he.org
Anti-walkthroughs for Deus Ex, Thief and Ultima http://www.it-he.org
Reign of the Just - An Ultima clone http://rotj.it-he.org
The DMFA radio series project http://dmfa.it-he.org
d+++ e+ N+ T++ Om U1234!56!7'!S'!8!9!KAW u++ uC+++ uF+++ uG---- uLB----
uA--- nC+ nR---- nH+++ nP++ nI nPT nS nT wM- wC- y a(YEAR - 1976)
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 11:34:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Mike Rivers" <mrivers@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:1126960307.718309.12390@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com
> Steve King wrote:
>
>> Let me put in a plug for Digital Audio Labs.
>
> . . . . and all of the other failrly good quality sound
> cards that have been mentioned in this thread.
>
> But let's take an imaginary look at the original poster
> (who of course none of us know, really). The question
> suggests someone who is either not aware of the
> exisitance of multi-channel audio interfaces, or is aware
> of them, doesn't want to spend that much money, but knows
> that "Sound-blaster" grade sound cards can be had by the
> truckload through eBay sources for $10 or so. So why not
> buy four of them and make an 8-channel recorded/player?
> Why are all of those idiots paying $500 for their MOTUs
> and Deltas, or $250 for their DAL cards?
>
> Read between the lines. The real answer to the real
> question behind the question is "no, unless you're a
> serious experimenter/programmer/computer geek."

Exactly. And, it might not take a lot of serious hardware
hacking to make a bunch of cheap cards synch up with each
other.

First you have to find cards that can be installed in
multiples - for example a lot of SoundBlaster cards have
drivers that are written in such a way that multiple
instances of the same card won't work. Then, you find the
crystals of the the cards, and set up a master clocking
scheme.

Thing is, the economics of multiple sound cards ain't what
it may seem, when cards like the Delta 1010LT sell for about
$200 for 8 analog channels. You can run up to 4 Delta
1010LTs and get up to 40 channels in and another 40 channels
out.

Other than the fact that most of the channels will have
unbalanced RCA-Jack I/O, Delta 1010LTs aren't half bad. They
support standard audio production levels, they have well
over 90 dB dynamic range, and they have frequency response
20-20K within a few tenths of a dB. Use 'em with the right
source, operator, mics and preamps, and they can sound
great.

If you could time-travel a Delta 1010LT-based DAW back to
the early 1970's, people would be cutting off body parts if
it meant they could have one! ;-)
!