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dimmer switch question

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Anonymous
September 16, 2005 11:08:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

hello,

can you take a light dimmer slider switch and place it in-line between
the amp and speaker to lower the volume of that speaker when you want
to?

radio shack has a knob version that is meant for this, but i was
wondering if you could do it with a light dimmer switch (i'm not sure
about impedance or safety issues, etc.).

i'm talking about cheezy intercom speakers rather than a hi-fi
situation.

More about : dimmer switch question

Anonymous
September 17, 2005 2:45:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

genericaudioperson wrote...
> can you take a light dimmer slider switch and place it in-line
> between the amp and speaker to lower the volume of that
> speaker when you want to?

No. Lamp dimmers and speaker volume controls are as
completely different as it is possible to get in an electronic
device.

Using a typical SCR/Triac lamp dimmer as a speaker-level
volume control would likely result in silence (or maybe a
bit of very distorted signal now and then). And using a speaker-
line L-Pad for dimming a lamp would result in a burned out-
control at best, or burn your house down in the worst case.

> radio shack has a knob version that is meant for this, but i
> was wondering if you could do it with a light dimmer switch
> (i'm not sure about impedance or safety issues, etc.).
>
> i'm talking about cheezy intercom speakers rather than a hi-fi
> situation.

Perhpas you are thinking of speaker "L-pads" which are often
packaged so that they can be mounted in a standard wall box
(like a light switch, etc.)?
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 6:34:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 16 Sep 2005 19:08:17 -0700, genericaudioperson@hotmail.com wrote:

>can you take a light dimmer slider switch and place it in-line between
>the amp and speaker to lower the volume of that speaker when you want
>to?
>
>radio shack has a knob version that is meant for this, but i was
>wondering if you could do it with a light dimmer switch (i'm not sure
>about impedance or safety issues, etc.).
>
>i'm talking about cheezy intercom speakers rather than a hi-fi
>situation.

As a general rule, I hate young people and I hate
smart people, and you seem like someone with two
strikes against ya. But,

This is the most inventive thing I've heard recently.

Actually, Variacs could do this just fine, but you'd
have to gang two of them. Maybe kinda lossy.

But to (only partially) answer your question, a really,
really fast (supersonic) "light dimmer" that also
didn't depend on the incoming voltage for its own
operation, and included serious output filtering
*could* actually do what you've suggested. But not
any ordinary commercial one.


If you can live with about <twenty steps, Niles sells
stepped autoformers excellent for consumer
uses that fit in a single-gang wall box. <$100US.
Well made, reliable, available, recommended.

Good fortune,

Chris Hornbeck
Irony and sarcasm emoticons available by request.
You place 'em.
Related resources
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 6:34:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Chris Hornbeck" <chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote in message
news:0avmi1ptrqtriijtig7tgv4kmaln8qrh7f@4ax.com...
> On 16 Sep 2005 19:08:17 -0700, genericaudioperson@hotmail.com wrote:
>
>>can you take a light dimmer slider switch and place it in-line between
>>the amp and speaker to lower the volume of that speaker when you want
>>to?
>>
>>radio shack has a knob version that is meant for this, but i was
>>wondering if you could do it with a light dimmer switch (i'm not sure
>>about impedance or safety issues, etc.).
>>
>>i'm talking about cheezy intercom speakers rather than a hi-fi
>>situation.
>
> As a general rule, I hate young people and I hate
> smart people, and you seem like someone with two
> strikes against ya. But,
>
> This is the most inventive thing I've heard recently.
>
> Actually, Variacs could do this just fine, but you'd
> have to gang two of them. Maybe kinda lossy.
>
> But to (only partially) answer your question, a really,
> really fast (supersonic) "light dimmer" that also
> didn't depend on the incoming voltage for its own
> operation, and included serious output filtering
> *could* actually do what you've suggested. But not
> any ordinary commercial one.
>
>
> If you can live with about <twenty steps, Niles sells
> stepped autoformers excellent for consumer
> uses that fit in a single-gang wall box. <$100US.
> Well made, reliable, available, recommended.
>
> Good fortune,
>
> Chris Hornbeck
> Irony and sarcasm emoticons available by request.
> You place 'em.

If I may, what Chris is trying to say is that light dimmers vary the duty
cycle for an AC circuit, sort of like PWM. When you turn down the dimmer, an
oscillator chops up the AC voltage (via triacs I think) such that a smaller
number of pulses produce full voltage. I don't know what the frequency of
these units might be, but they would have to be significantly beyond the
44.1 kHz range to not adversely affect audio signals. So, a standard light
dimmer might do something, but probably not what you'd want to put into
speakers. Standard AC light dimmers do not act as variable resistors, nor do
they act as variacs.
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 8:07:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

genericaudioperson@hotmail.com wrote:

> hello,
>
> can you take a light dimmer slider switch and place it in-line between
> the amp and speaker to lower the volume of that speaker when you want
> to?

No, this won't work.

Graham
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 11:50:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<genericaudioperson@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>can you take a light dimmer slider switch and place it in-line between
>the amp and speaker to lower the volume of that speaker when you want
>to?

No.

>radio shack has a knob version that is meant for this, but i was
>wondering if you could do it with a light dimmer switch (i'm not sure
>about impedance or safety issues, etc.).

Radio Shack has an 8-ohm attenuator. It will work, but because it lowers
the impedance that the speaker sees, it will change the sound. (Also it
gets very hot since it's basically dissipating all the power that is not
going into the speaker as heat).

The dimmer switch is a device that chops the end off the waveform, like
a distortion pedal. The more you turn it up, the more it chops off.
Since it is just turning on and off, it doesn't have to dissipate much
heat. But it produces a huge amount of distortion, which is why it
radiates all that RF trash.

>i'm talking about cheezy intercom speakers rather than a hi-fi
>situation.

Cheesy intercom speakers should probably be 45 ohm speakers to begin
with, right?
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 1:21:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

CeeDub wrote:

> "Chris Hornbeck" <chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote in message
> news:0avmi1ptrqtriijtig7tgv4kmaln8qrh7f@4ax.com...
> > On 16 Sep 2005 19:08:17 -0700, genericaudioperson@hotmail.com wrote:
> >
> >>can you take a light dimmer slider switch and place it in-line between
> >>the amp and speaker to lower the volume of that speaker when you want
> >>to?
> >>
> >>radio shack has a knob version that is meant for this, but i was
> >>wondering if you could do it with a light dimmer switch (i'm not sure
> >>about impedance or safety issues, etc.).
> >>
> >>i'm talking about cheezy intercom speakers rather than a hi-fi
> >>situation.
> >
> > As a general rule, I hate young people and I hate
> > smart people, and you seem like someone with two
> > strikes against ya. But,
> >
> > This is the most inventive thing I've heard recently.
> >
> > Actually, Variacs could do this just fine, but you'd
> > have to gang two of them. Maybe kinda lossy.
> >
> > But to (only partially) answer your question, a really,
> > really fast (supersonic) "light dimmer" that also
> > didn't depend on the incoming voltage for its own
> > operation, and included serious output filtering
> > *could* actually do what you've suggested. But not
> > any ordinary commercial one.
> >
> >
> > If you can live with about <twenty steps, Niles sells
> > stepped autoformers excellent for consumer
> > uses that fit in a single-gang wall box. <$100US.
> > Well made, reliable, available, recommended.
> >
> > Good fortune,
> >
> > Chris Hornbeck
> > Irony and sarcasm emoticons available by request.
> > You place 'em.
>
> If I may, what Chris is trying to say is that light dimmers vary the duty
> cycle for an AC circuit, sort of like PWM. When you turn down the dimmer, an
> oscillator chops up the AC voltage (via triacs I think) such that a smaller
> number of pulses produce full voltage. I don't know what the frequency of
> these units might be, but they would have to be significantly beyond the
> 44.1 kHz range to not adversely affect audio signals. So, a standard light
> dimmer might do something, but probably not what you'd want to put into
> speakers. Standard AC light dimmers do not act as variable resistors, nor do
> they act as variacs.

I'm afriad that triac dimmers chop at twice line frequency - i.e. 100 or 120 Hz.

The idea of an HF chopping method to control volume is intruiging though.

Graham
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 1:21:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote:
>I'm afriad that triac dimmers chop at twice line frequency - i.e. 100 or 120 Hz.

You know, this could be really cool between a guitar head and cabinet....
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 1:21:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Pooh Bear" <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:432BD1FC.C43C9267@hotmail.com...
>
> CeeDub wrote:
>
>> "Chris Hornbeck" <chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote in message
>> news:0avmi1ptrqtriijtig7tgv4kmaln8qrh7f@4ax.com...
>> > On 16 Sep 2005 19:08:17 -0700, genericaudioperson@hotmail.com wrote:
>> >
>> >>can you take a light dimmer slider switch and place it in-line between
>> >>the amp and speaker to lower the volume of that speaker when you want
>> >>to?
>> >>
>> >>radio shack has a knob version that is meant for this, but i was
>> >>wondering if you could do it with a light dimmer switch (i'm not sure
>> >>about impedance or safety issues, etc.).
>> >>
>> >>i'm talking about cheezy intercom speakers rather than a hi-fi
>> >>situation.
>> >
>> > As a general rule, I hate young people and I hate
>> > smart people, and you seem like someone with two
>> > strikes against ya. But,
>> >
>> > This is the most inventive thing I've heard recently.
>> >
>> > Actually, Variacs could do this just fine, but you'd
>> > have to gang two of them. Maybe kinda lossy.
>> >
>> > But to (only partially) answer your question, a really,
>> > really fast (supersonic) "light dimmer" that also
>> > didn't depend on the incoming voltage for its own
>> > operation, and included serious output filtering
>> > *could* actually do what you've suggested. But not
>> > any ordinary commercial one.
>> >
>> >
>> > If you can live with about <twenty steps, Niles sells
>> > stepped autoformers excellent for consumer
>> > uses that fit in a single-gang wall box. <$100US.
>> > Well made, reliable, available, recommended.
>> >
>> > Good fortune,
>> >
>> > Chris Hornbeck
>> > Irony and sarcasm emoticons available by request.
>> > You place 'em.
>>
>> If I may, what Chris is trying to say is that light dimmers vary the duty
>> cycle for an AC circuit, sort of like PWM. When you turn down the dimmer,
>> an
>> oscillator chops up the AC voltage (via triacs I think) such that a
>> smaller
>> number of pulses produce full voltage. I don't know what the frequency of
>> these units might be, but they would have to be significantly beyond the
>> 44.1 kHz range to not adversely affect audio signals. So, a standard
>> light
>> dimmer might do something, but probably not what you'd want to put into
>> speakers. Standard AC light dimmers do not act as variable resistors, nor
>> do
>> they act as variacs.
>
> I'm afriad that triac dimmers chop at twice line frequency - i.e. 100 or
> 120 Hz.
>
> The idea of an HF chopping method to control volume is intruiging though.
>
> Graham
>
>

Graham:

Ah, that makes sense. I just looked up the typical circuit design on these
and you are correct, no extra oscillator circuit. So, this might provide
some very strange behavior on audio signals! But, high frequency chopping is
essentially what PWM does. If the frequency of the duty cycle circuit was
high relative to the audio signal, it should work quite well for this. I
just don't think triacs would be fast and clean enough for quality audio.

Craig
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 3:00:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<genericaudioperson@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1126922897.716619.211080@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> hello,
>
> can you take a light dimmer slider switch and place it in-line between
> the amp and speaker to lower the volume of that speaker when you want
> to?

No, the way a light dimmer works depends on the signal having a constant
amplitude. Loudspeaker signals aren't like that; so even if you built a
circuit designed to cope with loudspeaker signal levels and frequencies, it
still wouldn't work like a volume control. .

Tim
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 4:03:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Not entirely related, but I tried putting a halogen dimmer switch in
place of the on/off switch for the rotating speaker inside an old
Baldwin organ. In my mind, it was going to allow me to instantly dial
in infintely variable rotation speeds. In reality, it ended up being
an on/off switch that required a full twist to start moving. I could,
occasionally, play with it and get it to rotate slowly, but it took
several minutes of tweaking and didn't hold that speed for very long.
Ah well...

Nate
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 5:29:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:
> <nateokeefe@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >Not entirely related, but I tried putting a halogen dimmer switch in
> >place of the on/off switch for the rotating speaker inside an old
> >Baldwin organ. In my mind, it was going to allow me to instantly dial
> >in infintely variable rotation speeds. In reality, it ended up being
> >an on/off switch that required a full twist to start moving. I could,
> >occasionally, play with it and get it to rotate slowly, but it took
> >several minutes of tweaking and didn't hold that speed for very long.
> >Ah well...
>
> I take it that you ignored the warning on the back about never using
> the dimmer with inductive loads like motors?
>
> You'd do better to use a ceiling fan speed control, but even so you
> shouldn't expect great stability.
> --scott
> >

Ceiling fan speed control: well that makes a hell of a lot more sense.

Yeah, it was a number of years ago when I was in college (not studying
EE, or how to read warning labels, obviously). The organ has long
since died and has been replaced by an identical one which is now
itself in need of repair (tibias too quiet, no output from rotating
speaker). Every time I think of having it repaired, I check the long
list on ebay for $50-100, thinking one will appear in central NC before
too long.

Nate
Anonymous
September 17, 2005 8:10:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<nateokeefe@hotmail.com> wrote:
>Not entirely related, but I tried putting a halogen dimmer switch in
>place of the on/off switch for the rotating speaker inside an old
>Baldwin organ. In my mind, it was going to allow me to instantly dial
>in infintely variable rotation speeds. In reality, it ended up being
>an on/off switch that required a full twist to start moving. I could,
>occasionally, play with it and get it to rotate slowly, but it took
>several minutes of tweaking and didn't hold that speed for very long.
>Ah well...

I take it that you ignored the warning on the back about never using
the dimmer with inductive loads like motors?

You'd do better to use a ceiling fan speed control, but even so you
shouldn't expect great stability.
--scott
>
>Nate
>


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 18, 2005 9:28:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Only if the dimmer is of autotransformer variety. Triac dimmers rely
on a set frequency and determining the timing of the phase to turn the
relay on at the right time. Even if a device was made that could
incorperate a range of frequencies, the sound would be "brittle" at
best ans the speaker keeps recieving peeks without any lead up.
Autotransformer dimmers are increasingly uncommon, so I doubt this is
a reasonable solution. It would be cheaper to just buy altenuators
($20 a piece easy) which will also ensure currect impedance.

On 16 Sep 2005 19:08:17 -0700, genericaudioperson@hotmail.com wrote:

>hello,
>
>can you take a light dimmer slider switch and place it in-line between
>the amp and speaker to lower the volume of that speaker when you want
>to?
>
>radio shack has a knob version that is meant for this, but i was
>wondering if you could do it with a light dimmer switch (i'm not sure
>about impedance or safety issues, etc.).
>
>i'm talking about cheezy intercom speakers rather than a hi-fi
>situation.
Anonymous
September 18, 2005 9:28:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Brandon Anderson wrote:
> Only if the dimmer is of autotransformer variety. Triac dimmers rely
> on a set frequency and determining the timing of the phase to turn the
> relay on at the right time.

I think it works by turning off at each zero crossing and
not turning back on until a variable threshold has been
reached at the input. It will work at whatever line
frequency you give it.


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 11:50:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

The circuitry either has to take into accound voltage, change of
voltage, or have a fixed frequency clock, else how does it know when
to turn on? Most I've dealled with have frequency clocks in the
control electronics including phase monitoring cards, but those are
proffessional racks. Even those that key on peak voltage (turn on at
50v, eg.) present a problem because sound is variable voltage.
Regardless of the control tech, triacs don't work well as attenuators.

On Sun, 18 Sep 2005 14:41:45 -0700, Bob Cain
<arcane@arcanemethods.com> wrote:

>
>
>Brandon Anderson wrote:
>> Only if the dimmer is of autotransformer variety. Triac dimmers rely
>> on a set frequency and determining the timing of the phase to turn the
>> relay on at the right time.
>
>I think it works by turning off at each zero crossing and
>not turning back on until a variable threshold has been
>reached at the input. It will work at whatever line
>frequency you give it.
>
>
>Bob
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 11:50:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Brandon Anderson wrote:
> The circuitry either has to take into accound voltage, change of
> voltage, or have a fixed frequency clock, else how does it know when
> to turn on?

I think the simple ones just use voltage. Triggering occurs
when some adjustable fraction of line voltage is reached at
the input.

> Most I've dealled with have frequency clocks in the
> control electronics including phase monitoring cards, but those are
> proffessional racks. Even those that key on peak voltage (turn on at
> 50v, eg.) present a problem because sound is variable voltage.
> Regardless of the control tech, triacs don't work well as attenuators.

Ah, you are talking about something specifically designed
for audio. I've never seen such a thing and can't imagine
how something derived from switching an audio signal on and
off would be listenable given the harmonics generated.


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 12:00:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 17 Sep 2005 07:50:03 -0400, kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

> <genericaudioperson@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>can you take a light dimmer slider switch and place it in-line between
>>the amp and speaker to lower the volume of that speaker when you want
>>to?
>
>No.
>
>>radio shack has a knob version that is meant for this, but i was
>>wondering if you could do it with a light dimmer switch (i'm not sure
>>about impedance or safety issues, etc.).
>
>Radio Shack has an 8-ohm attenuator. It will work, but because it lowers
>the impedance that the speaker sees, it will change the sound. (Also it
>gets very hot since it's basically dissipating all the power that is not
>going into the speaker as heat).
>
>The dimmer switch is a device that chops the end off the waveform, like
>a distortion pedal. The more you turn it up, the more it chops off.
>Since it is just turning on and off, it doesn't have to dissipate much
>heat. But it produces a huge amount of distortion, which is why it
>radiates all that RF trash.
>

This is technically incurect. The triac dimmer does not cut the end
off, it switches on when a signal is applied mid-wave, and stays on
until the voltage = 0. Essentially, it is removing the BEGINNING of
the wave, not end. Also, "the more you turn it up" the LESS it cuts
off of the wave. This is done by providing the on signal earlier in
the wave instead of later. This all is true only of triac dimmers
(using silicon controled rectifiers or solid state relays) and not of
older technology including autotransformers (variacs). New technology
also removes the "distortion" of the triac, producing a pure sine
wave. These are generally refered to as sine wave dimmers and are
just now being released by Electronic Theatre Controls and Strand
Lighting, among others. This, admitably, has little to do with a
consumer devices as of yet.

>>i'm talking about cheezy intercom speakers rather than a hi-fi
>>situation.
>
>Cheesy intercom speakers should probably be 45 ohm speakers to begin
>with, right?
>--scott
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 12:24:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Eddie Van Halen used to use a variac on his "famous" Marshall amp from
Van Halen's first few albums. I think he dimmed the power going into
the amp from the wall outlet, so he could crank it at lower volumes.

If that's the case, I think you just invented a new form of distortion!
That would be cool.

Here's the ad copy:
The "Dorsey Demolisher". You thought you knew every kind of guitar
distortion possible. Well my metal friend, you thought wrong. From
the mind and cluttered garage of Mr. Scott Dorsey comes the
"Demolisher". Hook this device between your amp head and cabinet and
listen to your tone take on new depths of distorted glory. Nu metal is
officially old rust now that the Demolisher is on the scene. Don't get
left behind.
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 12:33:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

thanks for all the replies everyone. i learned a lot (seriously).

i have a quick question for Mr. Dorsey:

You were saying that the attenuator "gets very hot". Is this heat a
constant heat that is unavoidable, or does it only heat up when it is
receiving a voice signal through the intercom?

since the speaker only gets occasional sound transmissions going
through it (like a 10 second message every hour or so), i'm guessing
maybe it wouldn't heat up much since it's not having to power soak all
that much.
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 12:33:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

thanks for all the replies everyone. i learned a lot (seriously).

i have a quick question for Mr. Dorsey:

You were saying that the attenuator "gets very hot". Is this heat a
constant heat that is unavoidable, or does it only heat up when it is
receiving a voice signal through the intercom?

since the speaker only gets occasional sound transmissions going
through it (like a 10 second message every hour or so), i'm guessing
maybe it wouldn't heat up much since it's not having to power soak for
very long.
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 6:39:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 19 Sep 2005 19:05:57 -0700, Bob Cain
<arcane@arcanemethods.com> wrote:

>Ah, you are talking about something specifically designed
>for audio. I've never seen such a thing and can't imagine
>how something derived from switching an audio signal on and
>off would be listenable given the harmonics generated.

Well! Just to take things further into the outfield,
aren't there light dimmers that count cycles, like a
card sharp counts cards, and switches at discrete
numbers of zero-crossings?

Purpose being, no current (into resistive loads) at
switch-point.

Amazing, really, how interesting *any* topic can be
in a good newsgroup.

My deepest thanks to all,

Chris Hornbeck
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 11:21:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Bob Cain" wrote ...
> Ah, you are talking about something specifically designed
> for audio. I've never seen such a thing and can't imagine
> how something derived from switching an audio signal on and
> off would be listenable given the harmonics generated.

Indeed. The harmonics generated are a problem even when
just used as a lamp dimmer.
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 1:16:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Chris Hornbeck" <chrishornbeckremovethis@att.net> wrote in message
news:t6tui11gaen00lpi8uhvij2d9cih4qqgms@4ax.com...

> Well! Just to take things further into the outfield,
> aren't there light dimmers that count cycles, like a
> card sharp counts cards, and switches at discrete
> numbers of zero-crossings?
>
> Purpose being, no current (into resistive loads) at
> switch-point.

I think some heater thermostats work roughly that way (I assume they use a
timer rather than count zero crossings, to avoid the need for a power supply
for digital electronics.)

But I don't think you'd want a light dimmer that switches the light on for 7
seconds then off for 3 seconds ... :-)

Actually, you might, but you wouldn't call it a light dimmer, you'd call it
a lighting efects controller, and you'd sell it at a higher price ... :-)

Tim
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 5:08:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<genericaudioperson@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>i have a quick question for Mr. Dorsey:
>
>You were saying that the attenuator "gets very hot". Is this heat a
>constant heat that is unavoidable, or does it only heat up when it is
>receiving a voice signal through the intercom?

It only gets hot when signal is going through it.

>since the speaker only gets occasional sound transmissions going
>through it (like a 10 second message every hour or so), i'm guessing
>maybe it wouldn't heat up much since it's not having to power soak all
>that much.

Just what are you trying to do here? Is this for a paging system or
an intercom?
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 1:56:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

that's good to know about the heat. i never distinguished the two in
my mind, but i guess it would be called a paging system since you can't
talk back into it.

it's so if somebody is annoyingly loud when they are trying to page
someone you can turn the speaker down so you don't have to get pissed
at the speaker and throw something at it.
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 5:12:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Thanks, Mr. Dorsey.

I seem to remember the volume control device at Radio Shack was
stepped. I'll have to pick one up this weekend.
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 8:24:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<genericaudioperson@hotmail.com> wrote:
>Thanks, Mr. Dorsey.
>
>I seem to remember the volume control device at Radio Shack was
>stepped. I'll have to pick one up this weekend.


Don't buy ANYTHING from Radio Shack. Ever. You'll just get annoyed in
the long run.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
!