Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

CPU cycles get tied up playing chess against computer

Last response: in Video Games
Share
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 13, 2005 11:06:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

I just want to know if there is a way to lower the tieup cycle of CPU
processor time when playing against chess engines like Fritz, Shredder
etc. Because for me...I keep the system restore option on...and I know
of occassions where leaving it this way causes the program to freeze
up and I have to remove the system restore feature. Has this problem
been fixed yet in an update?

Another problem is simply playing chess with the CPU cycles lower than
100%. Is there any way to accomplish this using the Chessbase Fritz
line of engines when using the Windows XP operating system? Thanks in
advance.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 13, 2005 5:53:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

I just set the process priority to be Low. Go to the Task
Manager->Processes tab->select the process->right click and select Set
Priority->Low.

It'll use 100% of the CPU time if the system is idle, but it makes it
easier to still read your email/browse the web/etc while your computer
analyzes batches of chess games in the background.

-Douglas

Alberich@somewhere.com wrote:

> I just want to know if there is a way to lower the tieup cycle of CPU
> processor time when playing against chess engines like Fritz, Shredder
> etc. Because for me...I keep the system restore option on...and I know
> of occassions where leaving it this way causes the program to freeze
> up and I have to remove the system restore feature. Has this problem
> been fixed yet in an update?
>
> Another problem is simply playing chess with the CPU cycles lower than
> 100%. Is there any way to accomplish this using the Chessbase Fritz
> line of engines when using the Windows XP operating system? Thanks in
> advance.
August 13, 2005 11:41:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

Alberich@somewhere.com wrote in rec.games.chess.computer:

> I just want to know if there is a way to lower the tieup cycle of CPU
> processor time when playing against chess engines like Fritz, Shredder
> etc. Because for me...I keep the system restore option on...and I know
> of occassions where leaving it this way causes the program to freeze
> up and I have to remove the system restore feature. Has this problem
> been fixed yet in an update?

The bug you are talking about had nothing to do with "cpu cycles" but with
backing up databases as part of the system restore feature way back in
ChessBase 8. A few months after the release of CB 8 this was patched.
Check Playchess.com for the last GUI update if your copy experiences freezes
on your system.


> Another problem is simply playing chess with the CPU cycles lower than
> 100%. Is there any way to accomplish this using the Chessbase Fritz
> line of engines when using the Windows XP operating system? Thanks in
> advance.

If you are hinting at performing multiple tasks there is no need to
artificially lower the priority of the Fritz GUI. It is set to normal. It
means when switching to another program and running it will give the active
application the CPU time it needs and lower the CPU load from Fritz.

Unless you manually set the CPU priority of the engines in Fritz to be high
of course. In that case Fritz will take up 100% of the CPU load almost all
the time.

You can check this with the task manager (CTRL-ALT-DEL)


--
CeeBee

***The cookie has spoken***
Related resources
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 14, 2005 12:15:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

On 13 Aug 2005 19:41:20 GMT, CeeBee <ceebeechester@start.com.au>
wrote:

>Alberich@somewhere.com wrote in rec.games.chess.computer:
>
>> I just want to know if there is a way to lower the tieup cycle of CPU
>> processor time when playing against chess engines like Fritz, Shredder
>> etc. Because for me...I keep the system restore option on...and I know
>> of occassions where leaving it this way causes the program to freeze
>> up and I have to remove the system restore feature. Has this problem
>> been fixed yet in an update?
>
>The bug you are talking about had nothing to do with "cpu cycles" but with
>backing up databases as part of the system restore feature way back in
>ChessBase 8. A few months after the release of CB 8 this was patched.
>Check Playchess.com for the last GUI update if your copy experiences freezes
>on your system.
>
>
>> Another problem is simply playing chess with the CPU cycles lower than
>> 100%. Is there any way to accomplish this using the Chessbase Fritz
>> line of engines when using the Windows XP operating system? Thanks in
>> advance.
>
>If you are hinting at performing multiple tasks there is no need to
>artificially lower the priority of the Fritz GUI. It is set to normal. It
>means when switching to another program and running it will give the active
>application the CPU time it needs and lower the CPU load from Fritz.
>
>Unless you manually set the CPU priority of the engines in Fritz to be high
>of course. In that case Fritz will take up 100% of the CPU load almost all
>the time.
>
>You can check this with the task manager (CTRL-ALT-DEL)

CeeBee, if I understand you correctly...then you're suggesting the
problem only happens if I multitask different applications besides
using Chessbase Fritz, etc. But that's not the case here. I'm NOT
multitasking with other programs open. Just Chessbase Fritz, etc
playing chess. It uses 100% CPU cycle to run when playing. And from my
talks to hardware computer vendors and technicians, they all tell me
that's a dangerous thing to do. So until I get more information...I'm
leaving my System Restore feature on...asd simly using Chessbase to
download new games only. If I have to play chess...I'll simply use the
replay option rather than tying up my CPU cycles so high at a time.
August 15, 2005 1:52:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

Alberich@somewhere.com wrote in rec.games.chess.computer:


> CeeBee, if I understand you correctly...then you're suggesting the
> problem only happens if I multitask different applications besides
> using Chessbase Fritz, etc. But that's not the case here. I'm NOT
> multitasking with other programs open. Just Chessbase Fritz, etc
> playing chess. It uses 100% CPU cycle to run when playing.

That's just excellent. Your copy of Fritz is working flawless. It is
supposed to take all processing power it needs if it is available.
There's nothing wrong with either Fritz or your CPU. Every program will grab
as much CPU time and load as it is possible to. Fritz is no difference.
Where did you think they developed that CPU for? To let it run at a fraction
of its ability?


> And from my
> talks to hardware computer vendors and technicians, they all tell me
> that's a dangerous thing to do.


Find some real experts instead of the idiots you consult. A CPU is well
capable of running 100% all the time.
CPU's are designed for full load and tested to last as long as you might
expect them to last. They get warm, and so the heatsink and fan keep them
cool. And so they can run 24/7 at 100%.

There are even some programs running in the background designed to use the
remaining CPU load if the CPU is idle or less than 100%. A well known
example is SETI@Home (or BOINC by now). These programs have been running on
client systems for years, taxing the CPU for 100%, often 24/7, never giving
any problems at all.


--
CeeBee

***The cookie has spoken***
August 15, 2005 11:02:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

<Alberich@somewhere.com> wrote in message
news:6jguf1hji4lr8rl81elf0s7ansec4s8ul9@4ax.com...
> On 13 Aug 2005 19:41:20 GMT, CeeBee <ceebeechester@start.com.au>
> wrote:
>
>>Alberich@somewhere.com wrote in rec.games.chess.computer:
>>
>>> I just want to know if there is a way to lower the tieup cycle of CPU
>>> processor time when playing against chess engines like Fritz, Shredder
>>> etc. Because for me...I keep the system restore option on...and I know
>>> of occassions where leaving it this way causes the program to freeze
>>> up and I have to remove the system restore feature. Has this problem
>>> been fixed yet in an update?
>>
>>The bug you are talking about had nothing to do with "cpu cycles" but with
>>backing up databases as part of the system restore feature way back in
>>ChessBase 8. A few months after the release of CB 8 this was patched.
>>Check Playchess.com for the last GUI update if your copy experiences
>>freezes
>>on your system.
>>
>>
>>> Another problem is simply playing chess with the CPU cycles lower than
>>> 100%. Is there any way to accomplish this using the Chessbase Fritz
>>> line of engines when using the Windows XP operating system? Thanks in
>>> advance.
>>
>>If you are hinting at performing multiple tasks there is no need to
>>artificially lower the priority of the Fritz GUI. It is set to normal. It
>>means when switching to another program and running it will give the
>>active
>>application the CPU time it needs and lower the CPU load from Fritz.
>>
>>Unless you manually set the CPU priority of the engines in Fritz to be
>>high
>>of course. In that case Fritz will take up 100% of the CPU load almost all
>>the time.
>>
>>You can check this with the task manager (CTRL-ALT-DEL)
>
> CeeBee, if I understand you correctly...then you're suggesting the
> problem only happens if I multitask different applications besides
> using Chessbase Fritz, etc. But that's not the case here. I'm NOT
> multitasking with other programs open. Just Chessbase Fritz, etc
> playing chess. It uses 100% CPU cycle to run when playing. And from my
> talks to hardware computer vendors and technicians, they all tell me
> that's a dangerous thing to do.

This is simply rubbish. Why dangerous. ?

Regards
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 15, 2005 12:47:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

On Mon, 15 Aug 2005 07:02:43 +0100, "Terry"
<terry@tbean.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:

>
><Alberich@somewhere.com> wrote in message
>news:6jguf1hji4lr8rl81elf0s7ansec4s8ul9@4ax.com...
>> On 13 Aug 2005 19:41:20 GMT, CeeBee <ceebeechester@start.com.au>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>Alberich@somewhere.com wrote in rec.games.chess.computer:
>>>
>>>> I just want to know if there is a way to lower the tieup cycle of CPU
>>>> processor time when playing against chess engines like Fritz, Shredder
>>>> etc. Because for me...I keep the system restore option on...and I know
>>>> of occassions where leaving it this way causes the program to freeze
>>>> up and I have to remove the system restore feature. Has this problem
>>>> been fixed yet in an update?
>>>
>>>The bug you are talking about had nothing to do with "cpu cycles" but with
>>>backing up databases as part of the system restore feature way back in
>>>ChessBase 8. A few months after the release of CB 8 this was patched.
>>>Check Playchess.com for the last GUI update if your copy experiences
>>>freezes
>>>on your system.
>>>
>>>
>>>> Another problem is simply playing chess with the CPU cycles lower than
>>>> 100%. Is there any way to accomplish this using the Chessbase Fritz
>>>> line of engines when using the Windows XP operating system? Thanks in
>>>> advance.
>>>
>>>If you are hinting at performing multiple tasks there is no need to
>>>artificially lower the priority of the Fritz GUI. It is set to normal. It
>>>means when switching to another program and running it will give the
>>>active
>>>application the CPU time it needs and lower the CPU load from Fritz.
>>>
>>>Unless you manually set the CPU priority of the engines in Fritz to be
>>>high
>>>of course. In that case Fritz will take up 100% of the CPU load almost all
>>>the time.
>>>
>>>You can check this with the task manager (CTRL-ALT-DEL)
>>
>> CeeBee, if I understand you correctly...then you're suggesting the
>> problem only happens if I multitask different applications besides
>> using Chessbase Fritz, etc. But that's not the case here. I'm NOT
>> multitasking with other programs open. Just Chessbase Fritz, etc
>> playing chess. It uses 100% CPU cycle to run when playing. And from my
>> talks to hardware computer vendors and technicians, they all tell me
>> that's a dangerous thing to do.
>
>This is simply rubbish. Why dangerous. ?
>
>Regards

Because, supposedly, if you tie up the CPU cycles too much...you're
putting the motherboard at risk of meltdown.
>
>
>
>
August 15, 2005 9:17:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

<Alberich@somewhere.com> wrote in message
news:h171g1tch1jofqujob9bnj00psu9pr4fkb@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 15 Aug 2005 07:02:43 +0100, "Terry"
> <terry@tbean.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:
>
>>
>><Alberich@somewhere.com> wrote in message
>>news:6jguf1hji4lr8rl81elf0s7ansec4s8ul9@4ax.com...
>>> On 13 Aug 2005 19:41:20 GMT, CeeBee <ceebeechester@start.com.au>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>Alberich@somewhere.com wrote in rec.games.chess.computer:
>>>>
>>>>> I just want to know if there is a way to lower the tieup cycle of CPU
>>>>> processor time when playing against chess engines like Fritz, Shredder
>>>>> etc. Because for me...I keep the system restore option on...and I know
>>>>> of occassions where leaving it this way causes the program to freeze
>>>>> up and I have to remove the system restore feature. Has this problem
>>>>> been fixed yet in an update?
>>>>
>>>>The bug you are talking about had nothing to do with "cpu cycles" but
>>>>with
>>>>backing up databases as part of the system restore feature way back in
>>>>ChessBase 8. A few months after the release of CB 8 this was patched.
>>>>Check Playchess.com for the last GUI update if your copy experiences
>>>>freezes
>>>>on your system.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> Another problem is simply playing chess with the CPU cycles lower than
>>>>> 100%. Is there any way to accomplish this using the Chessbase Fritz
>>>>> line of engines when using the Windows XP operating system? Thanks in
>>>>> advance.
>>>>
>>>>If you are hinting at performing multiple tasks there is no need to
>>>>artificially lower the priority of the Fritz GUI. It is set to normal.
>>>>It
>>>>means when switching to another program and running it will give the
>>>>active
>>>>application the CPU time it needs and lower the CPU load from Fritz.
>>>>
>>>>Unless you manually set the CPU priority of the engines in Fritz to be
>>>>high
>>>>of course. In that case Fritz will take up 100% of the CPU load almost
>>>>all
>>>>the time.
>>>>
>>>>You can check this with the task manager (CTRL-ALT-DEL)
>>>
>>> CeeBee, if I understand you correctly...then you're suggesting the
>>> problem only happens if I multitask different applications besides
>>> using Chessbase Fritz, etc. But that's not the case here. I'm NOT
>>> multitasking with other programs open. Just Chessbase Fritz, etc
>>> playing chess. It uses 100% CPU cycle to run when playing. And from my
>>> talks to hardware computer vendors and technicians, they all tell me
>>> that's a dangerous thing to do.
>>
>>This is simply rubbish. Why dangerous. ?
>>
>>Regards
>
> Because, supposedly, if you tie up the CPU cycles too much...you're
> putting the motherboard at risk of meltdown.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>

That isnt true.

Regards
August 15, 2005 9:26:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

Alberich@somewhere.com wrote in rec.games.chess.computer:


> Because, supposedly, if you tie up the CPU cycles too much...you're
> putting the motherboard at risk of meltdown.

Goodness gracious - what more hokum did those "hardware experts" tell you?

That your CMOS-battery uses nuclear fusion and needs a level 10 containment
field around it?

That you should press your keyboard keys carefully else data will be read
too fast to your hard disk, making it explode?

Wearing a tin foil hat to prevent you from growing ulcers by zeta radiation
coming from your screen?

If you OC'd your processor, and cooling is sub par, your system will
eventually lockup or spontaniously reboot or hang. In that case check
temperatures with a freeware utility (like SpeedFan or one of the many), and
see if overheating is indeed the case. If you didn't OC your system, a
proper CPU and mobo will not be "dangerous" or lead to "meltdown".

P4 CPU's will generally run at 50-55 Celcius (around 110 fahrenheit or so)
with 100% CPU-load, somethimes a bit higher. They have a thermal protection
system slowing down the processor if it should overheat.
AMD processors will run at higher temps, even to 80 Celcius (170 F) although
that is a bit on the high end.


--
CeeBee

***The cookie has spoken***
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 15, 2005 11:25:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

Alberich@somewhere.com wrote:

> Because, supposedly, if you tie up the CPU cycles too much...you're
> putting the motherboard at risk of meltdown.


If you overclock, you are running a risk.
Not by having the cpu do what it's supposed to do.
Changing priorities isn't overclocking.

HD
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 16, 2005 2:48:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

CeeBee <ceebeechester@start.com.au> wrote:
> Wearing a tin foil hat to prevent you from growing ulcers by zeta
> radiation coming from your screen?

I wear mine to stop the CIA mind control rays but it's good to know that
it's multi-purpose.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Sadistic Toy (TM): it's like a fun
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ child's toy but it wants to hurt you!
August 16, 2005 2:48:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

David Richerby <davidr@chiark.greenend.org.uk> wrote in
rec.games.chess.computer:


> I wear mine to stop the CIA mind control rays but it's good to know that
> it's multi-purpose.


Do you wear the cheap home made version or a professional one? It _does_
make a difference.

Cheap ones only stop FBI rays; these flimsy home made projects are to be
discouraged.

The sturdy professional ones might seem expensive, but keep out a lot more.
They stop both CIA intelligence and slam dunk WMD cases.

Spend the money. Better safe than sorry.

--
CeeBee

***The cookie has spoken***
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 16, 2005 11:57:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

CeeBee wrote:
<snip>
> P4 CPU's will generally run at 50-55 Celcius (around 110 fahrenheit or so)
> with 100% CPU-load, somethimes a bit higher. They have a thermal protection
> system slowing down the processor if it should overheat.
> AMD processors will run at higher temps, even to 80 Celcius (170 F) although
> that is a bit on the high end.
>
>

An AMD XP1700 I use for chess lies normally at 43-49C, standard cooling.
A ditto chess-machine, P4 Presscott, 65-75C, which is about normal for
that particular kernel with standard cooling.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 16, 2005 9:15:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

Alberich@somewhere.com wrote:

>Because, supposedly, if you tie up the CPU cycles too much...you're
>putting the motherboard at risk of meltdown.

Speaking as a fully qualified electronics engineer (see my web page)
I can assure you that this is not the case. On some systems the CPU
runs hotter, but all PCs are designed to run just fine at full load.
August 16, 2005 9:22:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

HD <hdchess@gmail.com> wrote in rec.games.chess.computer:


> An AMD XP1700 I use for chess lies normally at 43-49C, standard cooling.
> A ditto chess-machine, P4 Presscott, 65-75C, which is about normal for
> that particular kernel with standard cooling.



You are right, I was referring to an older batch. The prescott core runs
hotter than a northwood, although 75 C seems at the high end.
Because the AMD has the bad habit of not using their real clock speed but
something like the "speed comparable with an Intel of that speed" the AMD
tends to run higher temps if real clock speed is compared with Intel. I
believe the XP1700 runs at 1450MHz or so.

--
CeeBee

***The cookie has spoken***
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 17, 2005 4:49:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

CeeBee <ceebeechester@start.com.au> wrote:
> David Richerby <davidr@chiark.greenend.org.uk> wrote:
>> I wear mine to stop the CIA mind control rays but it's good to know that
>> it's multi-purpose.
>
> Do you wear the cheap home made version or a professional one? It _does_
> make a difference.
>
> Cheap ones only stop FBI rays; these flimsy home made projects are to be
> discouraged.
>
> The sturdy professional ones might seem expensive, but keep out a lot
> more. They stop both CIA intelligence and slam dunk WMD cases.
>
> Spend the money. Better safe than sorry.

Hahaha! Very clever. You know the CIA put tracking devices in the
ones you buy in the shops, right? And the last thing I need is to alert
the CIA to the fact that my mind is worth controlling. Remember: it's not
paranoia if they really are out to get you.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Broken Strange Painting (TM): it's
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ like a Renaissance masterpiece but
it's totally weird and it doesn't
work!
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 18, 2005 11:58:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

CeeBee wrote:
> HD <hdchess@gmail.com> wrote in rec.games.chess.computer:
>
>
>
>>An AMD XP1700 I use for chess lies normally at 43-49C, standard cooling.
>>A ditto chess-machine, P4 Presscott, 65-75C, which is about normal for
>>that particular kernel with standard cooling.
>
>
>
>
> You are right, I was referring to an older batch. The prescott core runs
> hotter than a northwood, although 75 C seems at the high end.
> Because the AMD has the bad habit of not using their real clock speed but
> something like the "speed comparable with an Intel of that speed" the AMD
> tends to run higher temps if real clock speed is compared with Intel. I
> believe the XP1700 runs at 1450MHz or so.
>

75C might be a bit high, but it's not the "usual" temp (hot wetter and a
lot of engine-activity). Maybe I can save some on the heatbill in the
winther!? :)  Funny enough, I was adviced to try an Intel this time
because of the traditionally lower temps - Prescott wasn't taken into
account!
AMD's reasons, I suppose, is commercial. But it makes things messy.
1450Mhz is pretty accurate.

HD
!