Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

burning 24 bit wav to what?

Last response: in Home Audio
Share
September 23, 2005 2:26:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I bought a CD. It appears to have some fault with the disk which causes
gaps. I can see this irregularity when i look at the playing surface.Anyway
, when i played it on my computer cdrw it did not display the same
malfunction so i figured i'd burn a duplicate copy by extracting the
tracs with soundforge. These files displayed properties of 16 bit 44hz but
,perhaps erroneously, i thought they had been changed from 24 bit so i used
the soundforge feature to set them at 24 bit. Now they do not burn to cdr. I
wonder if anyone wants to hurl a clue my way and if you know tell me
weather soundforge extracts the files as they are encoded to the original
CD , in this case 16 bit and my resetting them to 24 bit is of no use,
or if soundforge has reset the files from 24 to 16 and how they can be
applied to a medium i can play in my home DVD player and car CD player.
Thanks.

More about : burning bit wav

Anonymous
September 23, 2005 2:32:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

In article <OaqdnWeBk9IWjaneRVn-gg@adelphia.com>,
ck <cpkver8@BURDENadelphia.net> wrote:
>I bought a CD. It appears to have some fault with the disk which causes
>gaps. I can see this irregularity when i look at the playing surface.Anyway
>, when i played it on my computer cdrw it did not display the same
>malfunction so i figured i'd burn a duplicate copy by extracting the
>tracs with soundforge. These files displayed properties of 16 bit 44hz but
>,perhaps erroneously, i thought they had been changed from 24 bit so i used
>the soundforge feature to set them at 24 bit. Now they do not burn to cdr. I
>wonder if anyone wants to hurl a clue my way and if you know tell me
>weather soundforge extracts the files as they are encoded to the original
>CD , in this case 16 bit and my resetting them to 24 bit is of no use,
>or if soundforge has reset the files from 24 to 16 and how they can be
>applied to a medium i can play in my home DVD player and car CD player.
>Thanks.
>
>

Ummm...CD is a 16-bit format. If you extract data from a CD, you will
have a 16-bit file. If you want to burn a CD, you need to start with
as 16-bit file. What is all this junk about 24-bit stuff? If you aren't
doing any processing there is no need to change the word length.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 2:32:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Scott Dorsey" wrote ...
> ck wrote:
>>I bought a CD. It appears to have some fault with the disk which
>>causes
>>gaps. I can see this irregularity when i look at the playing
>>surface.Anyway
>>, when i played it on my computer cdrw it did not display the same
>>malfunction so i figured i'd burn a duplicate copy by extracting
>>the
>>tracs with soundforge. These files displayed properties of 16 bit 44hz
>>but
>>,perhaps erroneously, i thought they had been changed from 24 bit so i
>>used
>>the soundforge feature to set them at 24 bit. Now they do not burn to
>>cdr. I
>>wonder if anyone wants to hurl a clue my way and if you know tell me
>>weather soundforge extracts the files as they are encoded to the
>>original
>>CD , in this case 16 bit and my resetting them to 24 bit is of no
>>use,
>>or if soundforge has reset the files from 24 to 16 and how they can
>>be
>>applied to a medium i can play in my home DVD player and car CD
>>player.
>>Thanks.
>>
>>
>
> Ummm...CD is a 16-bit format. If you extract data from a CD, you will
> have a 16-bit file. If you want to burn a CD, you need to start with
> as 16-bit file. What is all this junk about 24-bit stuff? If you
> aren't
> doing any processing there is no need to change the word length.

If 16 bits is good, then 24 must be better.
Who cares about "standards"? :-)
Related resources
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 2:52:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"ck" <cpkver8@BURDENadelphia.net> wrote in message
news:o aqdnWeBk9IWjaneRVn-gg@adelphia.com
> I bought a CD. It appears to have some fault with the
> disk which causes gaps. I can see this irregularity when
> i look at the playing surface.Anyway , when i played it
> on my computer cdrw it did not display the same
> malfunction so i figured i'd burn a duplicate copy by
> extracting the tracs with soundforge. These files
> displayed properties of 16 bit 44hz but ,perhaps
> erroneously, i thought they had been changed from 24 bit
> so i used the soundforge feature to set them at 24 bit.
> Now they do not burn to cdr.

What you really mean to say is that they don't burn to CDR
as a standard audio CD with SF. If you fire up Nero or
Easy-CD for example, you can burn 24 bit files as data
files.

For another example, if you fire up Audition 1.5 or CE 2.1,
even 32 bit files can be burned as audio CDs - the software
just makes the conversion to 16 bits on the fly.

>I wonder if anyone wants to hurl a clue my way and if you
>know tell me weather
> soundforge extracts the files as they are encoded to
> the original CD , in this case 16 bit and my resetting
> them to 24 bit is of no use,

Roger.

> or if soundforge has reset the files from 24 to 16 and
> how they can be applied to a
> medium i can play in my home DVD player and car CD
> player.

What happens if you reset them back to 16 bits?

Any credible software that burns CDs should be able to burn
16/44 stereo files as an audio CD. SF has, every time I
tried that.
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 6:49:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"ck" <cpkver8@BURDENadelphia.net> wrote in message
news:o aqdnWeBk9IWjaneRVn-gg@adelphia.com...
> I bought a CD. It appears to have some fault with the disk which causes
> gaps.

Take it back and get one that plays.

Tim
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 7:36:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

ck wrote:
> I bought a CD. It appears to have some fault with the disk which causes
> gaps. I can see this irregularity when i look at the playing surface.Anyway
> , when i played it on my computer cdrw it did not display the same
> malfunction so i figured i'd burn a duplicate copy by extracting the
> tracs with soundforge. These files displayed properties of 16 bit 44hz but
> ,perhaps erroneously, i thought they had been changed from 24 bit so i used
> the soundforge feature to set them at 24 bit.

"Erroneously", indeed.
CDs are always 16bit, 44.1kHz and there's nothing at all to be gained
from changing that.

Any CD burning/duplication utility will do the job - soundforge is just
confusing you with features you don't need.

(but if Soundforge can burn audio CDs, it should be able to do the job too)

Anahata
September 23, 2005 9:16:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

ck ha scritto:
> I bought a CD. It appears to have some fault with the disk which causes
> gaps. I can see this irregularity when i look at the playing surface.Anyway
> , when i played it on my computer cdrw it did not display the same
> malfunction so i figured i'd burn a duplicate copy by extracting the
> tracs with soundforge. These files displayed properties of 16 bit 44hz but
> ,perhaps erroneously, i thought they had been changed from 24 bit so i used
> the soundforge feature to set them at 24 bit. Now they do not burn to cdr. I
> wonder if anyone wants to hurl a clue my way and if you know tell me
> weather soundforge extracts the files as they are encoded to the original
> CD , in this case 16 bit and my resetting them to 24 bit is of no use,
> or if soundforge has reset the files from 24 to 16 and how they can be
> applied to a medium i can play in my home DVD player and car CD player.
> Thanks.
>
>
use EAC (Exact audio copy)
http://www.exactaudiocopy.de/
Is free and is the best solution for ripping and burning cd-a.
You don't need to install, is simply to be copied in a folder.
It take care to pauses, exact track times and the reading process is
very carefully done so the copied cd will be very close to the original.
Here is no danger for stupid and unwanted 24 bits conversion.

Then go to the record shop and get a working copy.

alex
September 23, 2005 11:42:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Scott Dorsey" <kludge@panix.com> wrote in message
news:D h13md$lp7$1@panix2.panix.com...
> In article <OaqdnWeBk9IWjaneRVn-gg@adelphia.com>,
> ck <cpkver8@BURDENadelphia.net> wrote:
> >I bought a CD. It appears to have some fault with the disk which causes
> >gaps. I can see this irregularity when i look at the playing
surface.Anyway
> >, when i played it on my computer cdrw it did not display the same
> >malfunction so i figured i'd burn a duplicate copy by extracting the
> >tracs with soundforge. These files displayed properties of 16 bit 44hz
but
> >,perhaps erroneously, i thought they had been changed from 24 bit so i
used
> >the soundforge feature to set them at 24 bit. Now they do not burn to
cdr. I
> >wonder if anyone wants to hurl a clue my way and if you know tell me
> >weather soundforge extracts the files as they are encoded to the
original
> >CD , in this case 16 bit and my resetting them to 24 bit is of no
use,
> >or if soundforge has reset the files from 24 to 16 and how they can be
> >applied to a medium i can play in my home DVD player and car CD player.
> >Thanks.
> >
> >
>
> Ummm...CD is a 16-bit format. If you extract data from a CD, you will
> have a 16-bit file. If you want to burn a CD, you need to start with
> as 16-bit file. What is all this junk about 24-bit stuff? If you aren't
> doing any processing there is no need to change the word length.
> --scott
> --
> "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
I had seen some CDs labeled 24 bit. They were remasters of previously
released issues. I didn't see that specifically on this CD so it may be it
comes 16 bit in which case, for me, all should be well. Thanks .
Anonymous
September 24, 2005 12:30:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

ck <cpkver8@BURDENadelphia.net> wrote:
> I had seen some CDs labeled 24 bit. They were remasters of previously
>released issues. I didn't see that specifically on this CD so it may be it
>comes 16 bit in which case, for me, all should be well. Thanks .

All CDs, Red Book CDs, are 16-bit.

You can put "MADE FROM 24-BIT MASTERS!" in headline type on the front,
but they're still 16-bit.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 9:30:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

ck wrote:

> I had seen some CDs labeled 24 bit. They were remasters of previously
> released issues. I didn't see that specifically on this CD so it may be it
> comes 16 bit in which case, for me, all should be well. Thanks .

There's "CD" the audio disk (that's always 16-bit audio with some other
stuff that makes the player's display show track numbers and so on) and
then there's "CD" the storage media, which can contain any kind of data
file, and is not typically playable in an audio CD player.

What you have seen are 24-bit WAV files stored on a CD media. It's not
an audio CD, though you may be able to play audio from it using a
computer.
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 1:46:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:2dednYQ9-auHi6neRVn->
> What you really mean to say is that they don't burn to CDR as a standard
> audio CD with SF. If you fire up Nero or Easy-CD for example, you can burn
> 24 bit files as data files.

Why not just not dick with the WAV files in the first place ?

Or use the companion CD Architect module to burn the files (if they are
indeed still valid files after dicking around with them). With CDA you can
stick (and mix) pretty much any format files in the timeline, wihich get
converted and dithered in the fly when burning.

geoff
!