Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Bob Dylan: No Direction Home

Last response: in Home Audio
Share
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 1:27:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Just a reminder that the new Martin Scorsese film on Bob Dylan is on PBS
in two parts, tonight and tomorrow night. It's definitely worth seeing.

It covers Dylan from the time he left his home in Minnesota through
roughly his 1966 motorcycle accident, showing him in context of the
culture in which he grew up, and the musical, cultural, and political
world in which he made his mark. It's based largely on interviews and
performances by Dylan and his contemporaries. Very nicely done.
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 1:27:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jim Gilliland wrote:
> Just a reminder that the new Martin Scorsese film on Bob Dylan is on PBS
> in two parts, tonight and tomorrow night. It's definitely worth seeing.

Sounds like you may have already seen it. How long is the program,
actually? We have two PBS stations around here tht are running it, but
one of them (the one with the best signal - I don't have cable) is
running tonight's part in 90 minutes, while the snowy station is
running two hours. Both are running two hours tomorrow night. Is there
an extra half hour of fund raising in the two-hour version, or do you
suppose the more local station is cutting something? That would be a
shame.
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 4:04:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jim Gilliland wrote:

> According to their website, WETA has it on from 9 to 10:30. But they
> also note that its length is "Length : 01:56:46 min". So I suspect that
> it's just a mistake.

Same time in the weekly Washington Post TV guide and today's newspaper
and the Zap2it TV listing web site (followed at 10:30 by Nos Amours -
Saga of the Montreal Expos). Curious that the lengthly review in
today's Post didn't mention the time difference. I'll be out this
evening but I've set my VCR to record WETA between 9 and 11. Better to
watch 3/4 of the show with a good signal than all of it with a bad
signal. It's Sharon Rockifeller's station, so she can do whatever she
wants.

I'm sure it'll come around again when it's fund raising time, if it
isn't that time now.

> By the way, they seem to be planning to carry it several more times -
> especially if you can pull in their digital signal:

Sorry, my rooftop antenna doesn't get digital, and even if it did, my
vintage TV set wouldn't know what to do with it anyway. <g>
Related resources
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 4:30:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:

> Same time in the weekly Washington Post TV guide and today's newspaper
> and the Zap2it TV listing web site (followed at 10:30 by Nos Amours -
> Saga of the Montreal Expos).

I guess the Internet (and the newspaper, and the monthly WETA program
guide) isn't always correct. I phoned the station and they assured me
that it's running for two hours, that 10:30 was a mistake.

The old fashioned ways are sometimes best, even though the times they
are a'changin'.
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 5:18:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I'm watching it at the moment, on BBC.

And laughing at the people giving out about him selling out with his
electrified backing group.
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 5:30:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

AN interesting article in the Wall Street Journal last week mentioned that
this film was actually created by Bob Dylan's personal production company,
and Martin Scorcese (sic) wasn't approached to put his name on it for years
afterwards....Dylan apparently has the upper hand in managing his own past
and rise to fame.....


"Jim Gilliland" <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in message
news:8KSdnV26JsTUaqreRVn-rg@adelphia.com...
> Just a reminder that the new Martin Scorsese film on Bob Dylan is on PBS
> in two parts, tonight and tomorrow night. It's definitely worth seeing.
>
> It covers Dylan from the time he left his home in Minnesota through
> roughly his 1966 motorcycle accident, showing him in context of the
> culture in which he grew up, and the musical, cultural, and political
> world in which he made his mark. It's based largely on interviews and
> performances by Dylan and his contemporaries. Very nicely done.
>
>
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 6:08:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
> Jim Gilliland wrote:
>
>>Just a reminder that the new Martin Scorsese film on Bob Dylan is on PBS
>>in two parts, tonight and tomorrow night. It's definitely worth seeing.
>
>
> Sounds like you may have already seen it. How long is the program,
> actually? We have two PBS stations around here tht are running it, but
> one of them (the one with the best signal - I don't have cable) is
> running tonight's part in 90 minutes, while the snowy station is
> running two hours. Both are running two hours tomorrow night. Is there
> an extra half hour of fund raising in the two-hour version, or do you
> suppose the more local station is cutting something? That would be a
> shame.

I have seen it - I bought the DVD last week. To the best of my
knowledge, each part is about two hours in length. But I didn't
carefully time the two parts. It would seem odd that they would try to
edit this - there's really very little that they could cut without
really damaging the content. And as far as I know, the broadcast is
coming over the satellite live at 9 each night, so it isn't clear that
they could do much other than just drop a big chunk of it.

You might check with them to see if it's just a mistake on their
schedule. They may be planning to run the full show even if it isn't
indicated correctly on the website or printed guide.

According to their website, WETA has it on from 9 to 10:30. But they
also note that its length is "Length : 01:56:46 min". So I suspect that
it's just a mistake.

http://www.weta.org/tv/archive?series=136&episode=1809

By the way, they seem to be planning to carry it several more times -
especially if you can pull in their digital signal:

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/current_season/...
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 7:13:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Part one is just over two hours - saw part one in a local screening
Thursday night. Perhaps your PBS affiliate is choosing their own
'intermission' point? This film is really first rate - I doubt they've
edited it per se...

Looking forward to seeing the whole program this week.

Dan Ash
White Plains, NY


Mike Rivers wrote:
> Jim Gilliland wrote:
>
>>Just a reminder that the new Martin Scorsese film on Bob Dylan is on PBS
>>in two parts, tonight and tomorrow night. It's definitely worth seeing.
>
>
> Sounds like you may have already seen it. How long is the program,
> actually? We have two PBS stations around here tht are running it, but
> one of them (the one with the best signal - I don't have cable) is
> running tonight's part in 90 minutes, while the snowy station is
> running two hours. Both are running two hours tomorrow night. Is there
> an extra half hour of fund raising in the two-hour version, or do you
> suppose the more local station is cutting something? That would be a
> shame.
>
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 8:27:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mike Rivers wrote:
>
> Sorry, my rooftop antenna doesn't get digital, and even if it did, my
> vintage TV set wouldn't know what to do with it anyway. <g>

I'm sure your antenna would handle digital just fine. Digital TV uses
the same set of frequencies as analog, and generally requires less power.

But you're right about your TV.
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 12:45:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 14:08:30 -0400, Jim Gilliland wrote:

> Mike Rivers wrote:
>> Jim Gilliland wrote:
>>
>>>Just a reminder that the new Martin Scorsese film on Bob Dylan is on PBS
>>>in two parts, tonight and tomorrow night. It's definitely worth seeing.
>>
>>
>> Sounds like you may have already seen it. How long is the program,
>> actually? We have two PBS stations around here tht are running it, but
>> one of them (the one with the best signal - I don't have cable) is
>> running tonight's part in 90 minutes, while the snowy station is
>> running two hours. Both are running two hours tomorrow night. Is there
>> an extra half hour of fund raising in the two-hour version, or do you
>> suppose the more local station is cutting something? That would be a
>> shame.
>
> I have seen it - I bought the DVD last week. To the best of my
> knowledge, each part is about two hours in length. But I didn't
> carefully time the two parts. It would seem odd that they would try to
> edit this - there's really very little that they could cut without
> really damaging the content. And as far as I know, the broadcast is
> coming over the satellite live at 9 each night, so it isn't clear that
> they could do much other than just drop a big chunk of it.
>
> You might check with them to see if it's just a mistake on their
> schedule. They may be planning to run the full show even if it isn't
> indicated correctly on the website or printed guide.
>
> According to their website, WETA has it on from 9 to 10:30. But they
> also note that its length is "Length : 01:56:46 min". So I suspect that
> it's just a mistake.
>
> http://www.weta.org/tv/archive?series=136&episode=1809
>
> By the way, they seem to be planning to carry it several more times -
> especially if you can pull in their digital signal:
>
> http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/current_season/...

Well, that published running time is exactly what we are getting here in
the UK tonight (no ad breaks - so it is right). Starts in half an hour.

d
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 2:02:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 26 Sep 2005 13:18:04 -0700, studiorat wrote:

> I'm watching it at the moment, on BBC.
>
> And laughing at the people giving out about him selling out with his
> electrified backing group.

I've just stopped watching. They've managed to put something together that
just isn't that interesting.

d
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 2:02:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Don Pearce wrote:


> I've just stopped watching. They've managed to put something together that
> just isn't that interesting.

Personally I never found Bob all that interesting. He had a couple of
catchy tunes, I guess. Never have bought one of his records. Different
strokes and all that.
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 4:30:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I can NOT think of ANYTHING more boring than an expose of Bob Dylan's life


"Dr. Dolittle" <pdo@spamblasters.not> wrote in message
news:suZZe.57754$32.29447@tornado.rdc-kc.rr.com...
> Don Pearce wrote:
>
>
> > I've just stopped watching. They've managed to put something together
that
> > just isn't that interesting.
>
> Personally I never found Bob all that interesting. He had a couple of
> catchy tunes, I guess. Never have bought one of his records. Different
> strokes and all that.
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 4:30:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I just finished watching part 1, and even though I've never been a
particular fan of Dylan, I think the documentary was fascinating,
informative and well done.

--
John L Rice
Drummer@ImJohn.com

"Jona Vark" <noemail@all.com> wrote in message
news:0p0_e.256$sL3.208@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
>I can NOT think of ANYTHING more boring than an expose of Bob Dylan's life
>
>
> "Dr. Dolittle" <pdo@spamblasters.not> wrote in message
> news:suZZe.57754$32.29447@tornado.rdc-kc.rr.com...
>> Don Pearce wrote:
>>
>>
>> > I've just stopped watching. They've managed to put something together
> that
>> > just isn't that interesting.
>>
>> Personally I never found Bob all that interesting. He had a couple of
>> catchy tunes, I guess. Never have bought one of his records. Different
>> strokes and all that.
>
>
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 7:00:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 09:27:30 -0400, Jim Gilliland
<usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote:

>Just a reminder that the new Martin Scorsese film on Bob Dylan is on PBS
>in two parts, tonight and tomorrow night. It's definitely worth seeing.

Scorsese is a God.

I'd forgotten how beautiful Baez and Dylan were.
(She still is, of course.)

Thanks for the heads-up!

Chris Hornbeck
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 7:00:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Chris Hornbeck wrote:
>
> I'd forgotten how beautiful Baez and Dylan were.
> (She still is, of course.)

And those pipes...


Hadn't thought about Woodie's guitar badge (This Machine Kills Fascists)
for some time. Hmmm....
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 8:25:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

My Last Sigh wrote:
> AN interesting article in the Wall Street Journal last week mentioned that
> this film was actually created by Bob Dylan's personal production company,
> and Martin Scorcese (sic) wasn't approached to put his name on it for years
> afterwards....Dylan apparently has the upper hand in managing his own past
> and rise to fame.....

There was a Dylan film that someone shot and Dylan took over for
editing and production, but it was never released. This PBS documentary
apparently contains portions of that film.
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 11:03:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Chris Hornbeck wrote:
> On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 09:27:30 -0400, Jim Gilliland
> <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote:
>
>>Just a reminder that the new Martin Scorsese film on Bob Dylan is on PBS
>>in two parts, tonight and tomorrow night. It's definitely worth seeing.
>
> Scorsese is a God.
>
> I'd forgotten how beautiful Baez and Dylan were.
> (She still is, of course.)

Wasn't that something, seeing her looking at Dylan with such adoration?
I never really knew much about their relationship. In the interviews,
the most she ever called him was her "special friend", but you can learn
more just from seeing the light in her eyes. They were so young.

Nonetheless, he's not an easy person to sing with. <g> I love to hear
Baez singing Dylan songs, but I don't think much of their singing
together. (Apparently she loves singing them as well - there are
several Dylan songs on her new album.)
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 11:05:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

>
> The problem is that, although Bob is probably one of the greatest song
> writers of our time, he's really a pretty awful performer.

I disagree. I find his singing to be extremely interesting everytime I
hear him. I consider his extemporaneous vocal approach pure jazz.
Having said that, I realize that a lot of people don't get it or don't
care for it.
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 11:15:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

John L Rice wrote:
> I just finished watching part 1, and even though I've never been a
> particular fan of Dylan, I think the documentary was fascinating,
> informative and well done.

Dylan's influence was pervasive enough that even those who paid no
attention to him have been affected by him, both musically and
culturally. The cultural aspect is obvious - his songs became an anthem
for a generation, lending a great deal of force to the civil rights and
antiwar movements of the 1960s. And musically, his influence is also
enormous - it's easy to see Dylan's influence on the Beatles, and on
many later artists from David Bowie through Eminem.
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 1:46:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Your Ad Here! wrote:
> >
> > The problem is that, although Bob is probably one of the greatest song
> > writers of our time, he's really a pretty awful performer.
>
> I disagree. I find his singing to be extremely interesting everytime I
> hear him. I consider his extemporaneous vocal approach pure jazz.
> Having said that, I realize that a lot of people don't get it or don't
> care for it.

I'm with you 100%. In fact I have yet to hear a Dylan cover that I
prefer to the original.

It was interesting, in light of the ragging Dylan's singing often gets,
to check out that duet he did with Joan Baez at Newport in the
film--his pitch is mostly right on, while Baez' is all over the place.
He was an unconventional singer, but not an incompetent one.
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 1:47:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Dr. Dolittle <pdo@spamblasters.not> wrote:
>
>Personally I never found Bob all that interesting. He had a couple of
>catchy tunes, I guess. Never have bought one of his records. Different
>strokes and all that.

The problem is that, although Bob is probably one of the greatest song
writers of our time, he's really a pretty awful performer. Listen to
the covers of his songs instead of the originals and you'll see just
how great he really is.
--scott

And I don't care, I _still_ like Brewer and Shipley's version of _All
Along the Watchtower_ better than the one from that Ronsonol guy.
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 4:01:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Your Ad Here!" <bluemt@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:1127829957.675287.4030@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> >
>> The problem is that, although Bob is probably one of the greatest song
>> writers of our time, he's really a pretty awful performer.
>
> I disagree. I find his singing to be extremely interesting everytime I
> hear him. I consider his extemporaneous vocal approach pure jazz.
> Having said that, I realize that a lot of people don't get it or don't
> care for it.
>

After watching the show, I pulled out my Bob Dylan album and listened to it
again..especially his version of House of the Rising Sun (a song i've always
loved). Know what...I too had never really heard the lyrics until I
listened to his version. If you have the record or CD, give it a try.
September 27, 2005 5:39:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Kurt Albershardt <kurt@nv.net> writes:

>Chris Hornbeck wrote:
>>
>> I'd forgotten how beautiful Baez and Dylan were.
>> (She still is, of course.)

>And those pipes...


>Hadn't thought about Woodie's guitar badge (This Machine Kills Fascists)
>for some time. Hmmm....

Last I saw, Arlo had adopted that badge.

I loved the footage of Dave Van Ronk, The Kweskin Band, Woodie, The Weavers,
etc. Many of these acts never made it to "the mainstream" so it's nice
to see them get their due here.
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 8:17:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I hated the end tonight... I wantetd it to go on through Blood on the
tracks etc.

It was great to see Liam Clancy, he rocks. I saw him reading at a
folkie's reunion last year, and he knocked the place dead. You could
have heard a pin drop.... Same man owns a fine recording studio. And
knows how it works :o )

I'm loving "as good as I've been to you at the moment", particularly
for his version of "Arthur McBride"..
Anonymous
September 27, 2005 8:28:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

? We have two PBS stations around here tht are running it, but
> one of them (the one with the best signal - I don't have cable) is
> running tonight's part in 90 minutes, while the snowy station is
> running two hours. Both are running two hours tomorrow night. Is there
> an extra half hour of fund raising in the two-hour version, or do you
> suppose the more local station is cutting something? That would be a
> shame.

PBS is hilarious...

I'd love to see Bob Dylan appealing for pledges...
"Please donate now so we can keep bringing you quality programming for
the discerning viewer, just like you..."
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 1:36:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Chris Hornbeck wrote:
> On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 07:03:42 -0400, Jim Gilliland
> <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote:
>
> >> I'd forgotten how beautiful Baez and Dylan were.
> >> (She still is, of course.)
> >
> >Wasn't that something, seeing her looking at Dylan with such adoration?
> > I never really knew much about their relationship. In the interviews,
> >the most she ever called him was her "special friend", but you can learn
> >more just from seeing the light in her eyes. They were so young.
>
> Just saw the second half. My immediate comments, typed
> while Scorsese is on Charlie Rose real-time, is that
> the dictionary definition of "artist" should simply
> reference this movie. Nothing less can be useful;
> nothing more has yet been made, AFAIK.
>
>
> >Nonetheless, he's not an easy person to sing with. <g> I love to hear
> >Baez singing Dylan songs, but I don't think much of their singing
> >together. (Apparently she loves singing them as well - there are
> >several Dylan songs on her new album.)
>
> It worked for me, but I'm not really a professional in
> the sense that you are. I kinda just like what I like.
>
> Thanks, as always,
>
> Chris Hornbeck
> "I had a perspective on the booing, too. You
> can kill somebody with kindness." _Bob Dylan

I guess I never really 'got' Dylan in spite of
the fact that some of my favorite artists covered
his songs (Hendrix, Johnny Winter). I'm in the
camp that likes the songs but could do without
his performing.

I watched the first part (and taped the second)
to see what the fuss was about.
The show certainly gives a better understanding of
where he came from and how he progressed to his
popular status. I figure it's partly due to his being
in the right place at the right time: Greenwich
Village in the '60s.

I have a songwriter pal who at times will break
into his Dylan imitation and is fully capable of
clearing a room when he does.

rd
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 2:40:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Brian Middleton wrote:

> It was interesting, in light of the ragging Dylan's singing often gets,
> to check out that duet he did with Joan Baez at Newport in the
> film--his pitch is mostly right on, while Baez' is all over the place.


I never really heard live Baez until I bought the Woodstock movie. Damn,
that is some awful stuff. I prefer fingernails on a chalkboard to
listening to her.
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 6:12:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Dr. Dolittle wrote:
> Brian Middleton wrote:
>
>> It was interesting, in light of the ragging Dylan's singing often gets,
>> to check out that duet he did with Joan Baez at Newport in the
>> film--his pitch is mostly right on, while Baez' is all over the place.
>
>
>
> I never really heard live Baez until I bought the Woodstock movie. Damn,
> that is some awful stuff. I prefer fingernails on a chalkboard to
> listening to her.

Shows to go ya that pipes and pitch aren't always
simultaneously embodied. I was given a really good ear for
it and have always been amazed that Dylan could sound so
rough yet have such excellent pitch control. He's so good
at it that he can have you constantly feeling that he's on
the edge of slipping off while never really doing so.

Somebody else that can do that is Ramblin' Jack and he
tutored Dylan in the early days (if'n you believe him.) He
does slip off more than Bob does, though.


Bob
--

"Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
simpler."

A. Einstein
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 6:48:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 07:03:42 -0400, Jim Gilliland
<usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote:

>> I'd forgotten how beautiful Baez and Dylan were.
>> (She still is, of course.)
>
>Wasn't that something, seeing her looking at Dylan with such adoration?
> I never really knew much about their relationship. In the interviews,
>the most she ever called him was her "special friend", but you can learn
>more just from seeing the light in her eyes. They were so young.

Just saw the second half. My immediate comments, typed
while Scorsese is on Charlie Rose real-time, is that
the dictionary definition of "artist" should simply
reference this movie. Nothing less can be useful;
nothing more has yet been made, AFAIK.


>Nonetheless, he's not an easy person to sing with. <g> I love to hear
>Baez singing Dylan songs, but I don't think much of their singing
>together. (Apparently she loves singing them as well - there are
>several Dylan songs on her new album.)

It worked for me, but I'm not really a professional in
the sense that you are. I kinda just like what I like.

Thanks, as always,

Chris Hornbeck
"I had a perspective on the booing, too. You
can kill somebody with kindness." _Bob Dylan
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 12:05:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

> the right place at the right time: Greenwich
> Village in the '60s.

I found it a bit depressing and it left me perplexed after watching
this. It's hard to imagine such a vibrant music scene anywhere these
days. I thought about this a bit and realized that such times for the
arts are rare. Afterall, we're living in the wake of the tremendous
gains and cultural/political accomplishments of that brief period of
time and there's no need for an identical "cultural revolution" today.
There's a lot of nostalgia for those days from those who romanticize
the early sixties floating around, and while it would be cool if such a
performance art and music scene could exist today, it obviously cannot.
Events like these evolve organically. The music business also seemed
much better off when the publishing houses ruled the record business
and a great song made it on numerous records simultaneously. That can't
happen again either, no doubt. The new "voice" of the artist should be
expressing current realities however disjointed things are today.
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 2:59:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

I heard just the opposite, he was so flat and she was trying
to force her clean pure tones to his nasal ones and kept
missing because he was so all over the place.

--
Chip Wood

"Brian Middleton" <brian@night-kitchen.com> wrote in message

> It was interesting, in light of the ragging Dylan's
singing often gets,
> to check out that duet he did with Joan Baez at Newport in
the
> film--his pitch is mostly right on, while Baez' is all
over the place.
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 5:41:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:

> > The problem is that, although Bob is probably one of the greatest song
> > writers of our time, he's really a pretty awful performer.


Your Ad Here! wrote:

> I disagree. I find his singing to be extremely interesting everytime I
> hear him. I consider his extemporaneous vocal approach pure jazz.
> Having said that, I realize that a lot of people don't get it or don't
> care for it.
>


I love Bob Dylan for his phrasing and interpretation, the way I
love Nina Simone and Frank Sinatra for theirs.

TS
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 6:39:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Jim Gilliland" <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in message
news:43392b9a$0$1599$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com...
> John L Rice wrote:
> > I just finished watching part 1, and even though I've never been a
> > particular fan of Dylan, I think the documentary was fascinating,
> > informative and well done.
>
> Dylan's influence was pervasive enough that even those who paid no
> attention to him have been affected by him, both musically and
> culturally. The cultural aspect is obvious - his songs became an anthem
> for a generation, lending a great deal of force to the civil rights and
> antiwar movements of the 1960s. And musically, his influence is also
> enormous - it's easy to see Dylan's influence on the Beatles, and on
> many later artists from David Bowie through Eminem.

Having lived through the 60s .. there were a lot more than Dylan. He was
just a small part of it all. And if Hendrix , The Beatles had NOT recroded
his songs... well.. who knows.

I never thought of him as much more than an tired boring whiner. Regardless
of his 'contributions' to the successes mistakes made in the 60s.
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 6:39:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Jona Vark wrote:
> "Jim Gilliland" <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in message
> news:43392b9a$0$1599$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com...
>
>>John L Rice wrote:
>>
>>>I just finished watching part 1, and even though I've never been a
>>>particular fan of Dylan, I think the documentary was fascinating,
>>>informative and well done.
>>
>>Dylan's influence was pervasive enough that even those who paid no
>>attention to him have been affected by him, both musically and
>>culturally. The cultural aspect is obvious - his songs became an anthem
>>for a generation, lending a great deal of force to the civil rights and
>>antiwar movements of the 1960s. And musically, his influence is also
>>enormous - it's easy to see Dylan's influence on the Beatles, and on
>>many later artists from David Bowie through Eminem.
>
> Having lived through the 60s .. there were a lot more than Dylan. He was
> just a small part of it all. And if Hendrix , The Beatles had NOT recroded
> his songs... well.. who knows.

Yes, there were others. In the folk music world, names like Ochs and
Paxton come to mind. In rock, the Beatles and Hendrix were certainly as
influential as Dylan was. Yet all four of those artists were strongly
influenced by Dylan himself.

BTW, the Beatles didn't record any Dylan songs (though he and Harrison
later collaborated on "If Not For You", and much later on the Travelin'
Wilburys). Dylan's influence on the Beatles wasn't through giving them
songs. He just nudged their music into a new direction, partly by
introducing them to marijuana, but more so just by sheer musical example.

Hendrix did record at least one Dylan song, but as Scott pointed out
yesterday, the Brewer and Shipley version of "Watchtower" was far
superior to the Hendrix version.

Still, when you look at the music of the 60s and early 70s, it's pretty
easy to see how critical his role was. Would we ever have had a Simon
and Garfunkel or a Crosby Stills and Nash if the Byrds hadn't recorded
Mr. Tambourine Man? How would the Grateful Dead or the Jefferson
Airplane have unfolded if the Dylan influence hadn't been there? And
even artists who came along much later - John Hiatt or Rodney Crowell,
for example - show an enormous Dylan influence.

(When Rodney was here last month, he performed "Like A Rolling Stone",
introducing it as "probably the greatest rock and roll song ever
written". When I interviewed him a couple of years ago, he told me that
he'd listened to Bringing It All Back Home perhaps 50 times when it
first came out.)

> I never thought of him as much more than an tired boring whiner.

That's fine, we can all have different opinions.

> Regardless
> of his 'contributions' to the successes mistakes made in the 60s.

I can't parse that sentence. Sorry.
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 6:54:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Wed, 28 Sep 2005 15:39:21 +0100, Jona Vark wrote
(in article <tWx_e.851$Y_5.543@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>):

> Having lived through the 60s .. there were a lot more than Dylan. He was
> just a small part of it all. And if Hendrix , The Beatles had NOT recroded
> his songs... well.. who knows.
>

What songs are you thinking of? I'm trying really hard, but struggling to
think of any Dylan songs that were recorded by The Beatles. And obviously
Hendrix made a pretty good job of All Along The Watchtower, but apart from
that, I'm coming up blank as well unless you're counting the odd live cover
long after Dylan was a star in his own right...

--
yorkio
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 7:03:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bob Cain <arcane@arcanemethods.com> writes:

> Dr. Dolittle wrote:
> > Brian Middleton wrote:
> >
> >> It was interesting, in light of the ragging Dylan's singing often gets,
> >> to check out that duet he did with Joan Baez at Newport in the
> >> film--his pitch is mostly right on, while Baez' is all over the place.
> >
> >
> >
> > I never really heard live Baez until I bought the Woodstock movie. Damn,
> > that is some awful stuff. I prefer fingernails on a chalkboard to
> > listening to her.
>
> Shows to go ya that pipes and pitch aren't always
> simultaneously embodied. I was given a really good ear for
> it and have always been amazed that Dylan could sound so
> rough yet have such excellent pitch control. He's so good
> at it that he can have you constantly feeling that he's on
> the edge of slipping off while never really doing so.
>

I'm not a big follower of the 60's stuff, but I do listen to (and record) a
lot of local rock/folk music in my area. I think what defines the true
artists is both their creativity and their perseverance. Like any genius,
they make it look so easy, and other people could probably perform just as
well, but how did they find their unique voice in the first place? Whether it
becomes popular or successful is another thing. I bet Dylan and many others
would have just kept performing anyway.

> Bob
> --
>
> "Things should be described as simply as possible, but no
> simpler."
>
> A. Einstein

Hey, your sig is appropriate here!


Richard
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 7:35:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

yorkio wrote:
> On Wed, 28 Sep 2005 15:39:21 +0100, Jona Vark wrote
> (in article <tWx_e.851$Y_5.543@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>):
>
> > Having lived through the 60s .. there were a lot more than Dylan. He was
> > just a small part of it all. And if Hendrix , The Beatles had NOT recroded
> > his songs... well.. who knows.
> >
>
> What songs are you thinking of? I'm trying really hard, but struggling to
> think of any Dylan songs that were recorded by The Beatles. And obviously
> Hendrix made a pretty good job of All Along The Watchtower, but apart from
> that, I'm coming up blank as well unless you're counting the odd live cover
> long after Dylan was a star in his own right...
>
> --
> yorkio



The song "You've got to hide your love away" was an unmistakable Dylan
immitation by the beatles. The birds, the turtles, and peter paul and
mary recorded the bejesus out of dylan tunes.

Mike
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 10:36:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

RD Jones wrote:

> I have a songwriter pal who at times will break
> into his Dylan imitation and is fully capable of
> clearing a room when he does.

And there's the rub: when Dylan does it a different thing happens. <g>

--
ha
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 10:43:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

yorkio wrote:

> On Wed, 28 Sep 2005 15:39:21 +0100, Jona Vark wrote
> (in article <tWx_e.851$Y_5.543@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>):

> > Having lived through the 60s .. there were a lot more than Dylan. He was
> > just a small part of it all. And if Hendrix , The Beatles had NOT recroded
> > his songs... well.. who knows.

> What songs are you thinking of? I'm trying really hard, but struggling to
> think of any Dylan songs that were recorded by The Beatles. And obviously
> Hendrix made a pretty good job of All Along The Watchtower, but apart from
> that, I'm coming up blank as well unless you're counting the odd live cover
> long after Dylan was a star in his own right...

From Mr. Draper over in RMMGA:

> His Bobness.....

> Oh, where have you been, my blue-eyed son?
> There must be some way out of here," said the joker to the thief...
> You walk into the room, With your pencil in your hand....
> How many roads must a man walk down, Before you call him a man?
> Corrina, Corrina, Gal, where you been so long?
> Dear landlord, Please don't put a price on my soul....
> In the time of my confession, in the hour of my deepest need...
> I got this graveyard woman, you know she keeps my kid...
> You may be an ambassador to England or France....
> Well, if you're travelin' in the north country fair.....
> Oh God said to Abraham, "Kill me a son"....
> I dreamed I saw St. Augustine, alive as you or me....
> Someone's got it in for me, they're planting stories in the press....
> When you're lost in the rain in Juarez and it's Eastertime too.....
> John Wesley Harding was a friend to the poor.....
> Mama, take this badge off of me.....
> Once upon a time you dressed so fine....
> Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me....
> I ain't gonna work on Maggie's farm no more....
> Can't you hear that rooster crowin'?
> Down the street the dogs are barkin' and the day is a-gettin' dark.....
> You got a lotta nerve.....
> When your mother sends back all your invitations....
> Oh all the money that in my whole life I did spend......
> With your mercury mouth in the missionary times.....
> Oh, the ragman draws circles up and down the block.....
> Ramblin' outa the wild West, leavin' the towns I love the best.....
> Well, Frankie Lee and Judas Priest, they were the best of friends....
> Tweeter and the Monkey Man were hard up for cash....
> Well, my shoes, they come from Singapore....
> Ain't it just like the night to play tricks when you're tryin' to be so
> quiet?
> Oh my name it is nothin' my age it means less....
> I've seen love go by my door It's never been this close before....

Mr Draper rests his case.

--
ha
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 12:01:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Jim Gilliland" <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in message
news:433abb20$0$1571$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com...
>
> BTW, the Beatles didn't record any Dylan songs (though he and Harrison
> later collaborated on "If Not For You", and much later on the Travelin'
> Wilburys). Dylan's influence on the Beatles wasn't through giving them
> songs. He just nudged their music into a new direction, partly by
> introducing them to marijuana, but more so just by sheer musical example.


Yes.. you're right.. My bad.
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 2:44:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Nil wrote:

> On 28 Sep 2005, yorkio <weedk@l.mailsiphon.com> wrote in
> > And obviously Hendrix made a pretty good job of All Along
> > The Watchtower, but apart from that, I'm coming up blank as well
> > unless you're counting the odd live cover long after Dylan was a
> > star in his own right...
>
> Hendrix also covered "Like a Rolling Stone", "Please Crawl Out Your
> Window" and "Drifter's Escape". Maybe a couple of others. He was
> obviously a fan.

Hendrix was quite fascinated with Dylan.
He was torn between staying in the Village
("where it's all at") and going to London
with Chandler. Since he was already becoming
known in NY, he let Chas talk him into going
to London and the rest is history.

'Like a Rolling Stone' was a high point at the
Monterey show when Hendrix first returned to
the states. (burning guitar notwithstanding)
"Yes, I know I missed a verse, don't worry about it"

After viewing the second part of the PBS show
I will concede that I now have a higher
appreciation of Dylan and a better understanding
of what drove him.

rd
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 3:18:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 28 Sep 2005 08:05:29 -0700, "Your Ad Here!" <bluemt@earthlink.net>
wrote:

> there's no need for an identical "cultural revolution" today.

Wow. Just shows how big a divergence of views is possible.

>There's a lot of nostalgia for those days from those who romanticize
>the early sixties floating around,

It's a strange phenomenon. The 1960's were very hard times
culturally. Not as mean-spirited as today, but much tougher
going.

Thanks for your thoughts,

Chris Hornbeck
"I had a perspective on the booing, too. You
can kill somebody with kindness." -Bob Dylan
September 29, 2005 3:46:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 28 Sep 2005, yorkio <weedk@l.mailsiphon.com> wrote in
news:0001HW.BF606D38019CD140F04885B0@proxy.news.easynews.com:

> What songs are you thinking of? I'm trying really hard, but
> struggling to think of any Dylan songs that were recorded by The
> Beatles.

The answer is None. The poster is mistaken.

> And obviously Hendrix made a pretty good job of All Along
> The Watchtower, but apart from that, I'm coming up blank as well
> unless you're counting the odd live cover long after Dylan was a
> star in his own right...

Hendrix also covered "Like a Rolling Stone", "Please Crawl Out Your
Window" and "Drifter's Escape". Maybe a couple of others. He was
obviously a fan.
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 3:59:43 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Your Ad Here! wrote:

> I found it a bit depressing and it left me perplexed after watching
> this. It's hard to imagine such a vibrant music scene anywhere these
> days. I thought about this a bit and realized that such times for the
> arts are rare.


They didn't have computers back then. People had more time on their hands.
September 29, 2005 11:44:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On 29 Sep 2005, "RD Jones" <annonn@juno.com> wrote in
news:1127972680.513756.301560@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

> 'Like a Rolling Stone' was a high point at the
> Monterey show when Hendrix first returned to
> the states. (burning guitar notwithstanding)
> "Yes, I know I missed a verse, don't worry about it"

I love that version, such a great vibe to it!

"And that's Bob Dylan's grandmother over there..."
(a joke about Noel Redding's or Mitch Mitchell's permed hair-doos, I
always assumed.)
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 1:53:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It reminds me of how Ozzie Smith used to play shortstop...he did
everything "wrong" technically, and the baseball announcers were
constantly warning the kids at home not to imitate his style. But when
*he* did it, it was utter brilliance.
September 29, 2005 10:13:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Brian Middleton" <brian@night-kitchen.com> writes:

>It reminds me of how Ozzie Smith used to play shortstop...he did
>everything "wrong" technically, and the baseball announcers were
>constantly warning the kids at home not to imitate his style. But when
>*he* did it, it was utter brilliance.

Yeah, and I remember HNIC's Howie Meeker showing films of how Bobby Orr
skated practically on his ankles, and did his stops and turns wrong ...
but it turned out he was actually pushing off faster when he re-started
than those who did it "properly" at that time.
!