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low rumbling sound; hearing damage?

Last response: in Home Audio
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September 29, 2005 10:29:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

you'll have to speak up. Is it possible that a hearing problem could
cause a person, say an imaginative person, to think they were hearing
a low frequency, low level sound just like a distant engine or
compressor or pump or massinator or some industrial sounding thing? I
can plainly hear it as of a week ago but if I get some mics out and
turn it all way up there is no such sound in any direction.
We live in a rural area so even though it's a roaring aircraft hell
all day it is dead quiet at night. It changes volume if I walk around
the grounds but naturally it's loudest where I sleep. Also, it seems
to be coming from which ever direction I face initially, then seems to
originate from everywhere at once but then sound in general is kind of
confussed around here because of topog, buildings etc. It gets quieter
if I put in ear plugs but I can still hear it. Thank you, s.
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 10:29:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"spud" <itsafake@itslead.com> wrote...
<snip>
: a low frequency, low level sound just like a distant engine or
: compressor or pump or massinator or some industrial sounding thing? I
: can plainly hear it as of a week ago but if I get some mics out and
: turn it all way up there is no such sound in any direction.
: We live in a rural area so even though it's a roaring aircraft hell
: all day it is dead quiet at night. It changes volume if I walk around
: the grounds but naturally it's loudest where I sleep. Also, it seems
: to be coming from which ever direction I face initially, then seems to
: originate from everywhere at once but then sound in general is kind of
: confussed around here because of topog, buildings etc. It gets quieter
: if I put in ear plugs but I can still hear it. Thank you, s.


At least two times when I have been in Death Valley, numerous years apart, I
have heard a very low level, low frequency humming sound, and other people I
was with did not hear it. It sounded like I would imagine a lot of idling
jet engines at a distant airbase might sound from 50 miles away across the
desert. At another location the next day, maybe 50-100 miles away, I would
not hear it at all. I never thought about it much until someone mentioned
the "Taos Hum" so I looked it up on Google. It sounds like you've got it,
spud!

http://amasci.com/hum/info.txt
This URL has material from 1994 describing how some researchers tried to
record the hum using "electromagnetic, magnetic, audio, geologic, and radio
frequency spectrums from about 5 HZ on out to about 25 Gigahertz." Read
this page if you appreciate things like tesla plasma spheres, curl free
magnetic vector potential fields, and superparamagnetic crystals on honeybee
ganglions.

They even have a recipe: "Starting with a 32 Hz sine wave, add two 64 HZ
sine wave into the mix and try to zero beat the two 64 HZ oscillators as
closely as possible. When they are as close to zero beat as you can possibly
get them add a slight amount of FM to one of the 64 HZ signals. Record it to
DAT tape and play it back at threshold of hearing through a regular home
stereo system and you will get an idea of what the phenomenon sounds like."

If someone wants to generate this auditory confection and post a short wav
file somewhere, I'd be happy to listen and tell you if it's like what I've
heard out in the desert.

Bruce
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 12:52:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"spud" <itsafake@itslead.com> wrote in message
news:p q1nj1pf6q3e1952a5u0dhmgj3sr4qfu79@4ax.com...
> you'll have to speak up. Is it possible that a hearing problem could
> cause a person, say an imaginative person, to think they were hearing
> a low frequency, low level sound just like a distant engine or
> compressor or pump or massinator or some industrial sounding thing?

Is it synchronised with your pulse? If so, try posting to one of the
health/hearing groups.

--
M Stewart
Milton Keynes, UK
http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
Related resources
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 12:54:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 06:29:10 GMT, spud wrote:

> you'll have to speak up. Is it possible that a hearing problem could
> cause a person, say an imaginative person, to think they were hearing
> a low frequency, low level sound just like a distant engine or
> compressor or pump or massinator or some industrial sounding thing? I
> can plainly hear it as of a week ago but if I get some mics out and
> turn it all way up there is no such sound in any direction.
> We live in a rural area so even though it's a roaring aircraft hell
> all day it is dead quiet at night. It changes volume if I walk around
> the grounds but naturally it's loudest where I sleep. Also, it seems
> to be coming from which ever direction I face initially, then seems to
> originate from everywhere at once but then sound in general is kind of
> confussed around here because of topog, buildings etc. It gets quieter
> if I put in ear plugs but I can still hear it. Thank you, s.

You should go to an audiologist and have yourself tested for tinnitus.

d
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 2:24:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 06:29:10 GMT, spud <itsafake@itslead.com> wrote:

>you'll have to speak up. Is it possible that a hearing problem could
>cause a person, say an imaginative person, to think they were hearing
>a low frequency, low level sound just like a distant engine or
>compressor or pump or massinator or some industrial sounding thing? I
>can plainly hear it as of a week ago but if I get some mics out and
>turn it all way up there is no such sound in any direction.
>We live in a rural area so even though it's a roaring aircraft hell
>all day it is dead quiet at night. It changes volume if I walk around
>the grounds but naturally it's loudest where I sleep. Also, it seems
>to be coming from which ever direction I face initially, then seems to
>originate from everywhere at once but then sound in general is kind of
>confussed around here because of topog, buildings etc. It gets quieter
>if I put in ear plugs but I can still hear it. Thank you, s


-- Yes, if the rumble pulses at your heartbeat rate, it might be a
problem with your inner ear's blood vessels. I'd check an otologist
just for a case.

An enviromental low frequency rumble can be extremely annoying and can
even cause a nausea if loud enough expecially in closed spaces ie.
smaller rooms having big windows open. As an example, I have a
backyard room with big door and window -- almost the full opening
towards the yard. There is a parking place of a nearby hotel. It's not
visible from the room but there are surrounding houses reflecting the
noise. Now, when window and door are open and when a big tourist bus
starts its engine there, it almost makes me walk out the room. This is
not subtle at all and its boosted by resonances. The direction of such
low frequency noise is of course hard to estimate.

Edi Zubovic, Crikvenica, Croatia
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 6:22:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Bruce Cooley <bcooley@teleport.com> wrote:
> "spud" <itsafake@itslead.com> wrote...
> <snip>
> : a low frequency, low level sound just like a distant engine or
> : compressor or pump or massinator or some industrial sounding thing? I
> : can plainly hear it as of a week ago but if I get some mics out and
> : turn it all way up there is no such sound in any direction.
> : We live in a rural area so even though it's a roaring aircraft hell
> : all day it is dead quiet at night. It changes volume if I walk around
> : the grounds but naturally it's loudest where I sleep. Also, it seems
> : to be coming from which ever direction I face initially, then seems to
> : originate from everywhere at once but then sound in general is kind of
> : confussed around here because of topog, buildings etc. It gets quieter
> : if I put in ear plugs but I can still hear it. Thank you, s.


> At least two times when I have been in Death Valley, numerous years apart, I
> have heard a very low level, low frequency humming sound, and other people I
> was with did not hear it. It sounded like I would imagine a lot of idling
> jet engines at a distant airbase might sound from 50 miles away across the
> desert. At another location the next day, maybe 50-100 miles away, I would
> not hear it at all. I never thought about it much until someone mentioned
> the "Taos Hum" so I looked it up on Google. It sounds like you've got it,
> spud!

> http://amasci.com/hum/info.txt
> This URL has material from 1994 describing how some researchers tried to
> record the hum using "electromagnetic, magnetic, audio, geologic, and radio
> frequency spectrums from about 5 HZ on out to about 25 Gigahertz." Read
> this page if you appreciate things like tesla plasma spheres, curl free
> magnetic vector potential fields, and superparamagnetic crystals on honeybee
> ganglions.

> They even have a recipe: "Starting with a 32 Hz sine wave, add two 64 HZ
> sine wave into the mix and try to zero beat the two 64 HZ oscillators as
> closely as possible. When they are as close to zero beat as you can possibly
> get them add a slight amount of FM to one of the 64 HZ signals. Record it to
> DAT tape and play it back at threshold of hearing through a regular home
> stereo system and you will get an idea of what the phenomenon sounds like."

> If someone wants to generate this auditory confection and post a short wav
> file somewhere, I'd be happy to listen and tell you if it's like what I've
> heard out in the desert.

Okay...does anyone else hear with the back of their necks? There are
specific frequencies that seem to almost be detected by the back of
my neck! The most obvious situation is when I am swimming in a lake
that has motorboats. As I submerge to the point where my neck is under
water but my ears are above water I seem to detect the engine noise,
and I know it is not coming through my ear canals.

I assume that there is something in the neck that resonates at specific
frequencies and this is still somehow transfered to the cochlea.

Anyone else?

Time to see the ear doctor?
Or perhaps it's off to the psych ward!

Rob R.
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 6:23:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 14:22:59 +0000 (UTC), Rob Reedijk
<reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote:

>Okay...does anyone else hear with the back of their necks? There are
>specific frequencies that seem to almost be detected by the back of
>my neck! The most obvious situation is when I am swimming in a lake
>that has motorboats. As I submerge to the point where my neck is under
>water but my ears are above water I seem to detect the engine noise,
>and I know it is not coming through my ear canals.
>
>I assume that there is something in the neck that resonates at specific
>frequencies and this is still somehow transfered to the cochlea.

I would guess it's actually your throat, since it has the thinnest
membrane of skin, resonating through your eustachian tubes...
jtougas

listen- there's a hell of a good universe next door
let's go

e.e. cummings
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 6:23:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Rob Reedijk" <reedijk@hera.med.utoronto.ca> wrote...
: Okay...does anyone else hear with the back of their necks? There are
: specific frequencies that seem to almost be detected by the back of
: my neck! The most obvious situation is when I am swimming in a lake
: that has motorboats. As I submerge to the point where my neck is under
: water but my ears are above water I seem to detect the engine noise,
: and I know it is not coming through my ear canals.
:
: I assume that there is something in the neck that resonates at specific
: frequencies and this is still somehow transfered to the cochlea.
:
: Anyone else?
:
: Time to see the ear doctor?
: Or perhaps it's off to the psych ward!
:
: Rob R.


Your back bone connected to your...neck bone,
Your neck bone connected to your...head bone,
Your head bone connected to your... ...ear bone,
Now hear the word of the Lord!

Maybe nobody here knows that song....

I know a woman--a viola player in the local symphony--who relies mostly on
the acoustic energy conduction through her bone structure because she was
born with some middle ear pieces missing or something like that and has had
other ear problems that at one point resulted in complete removal of the
entire contents of her middle ear cavity on one side.

Bruce
!