Why 2 XP disk?

I just got WinXP Pro in the mail today. There are two disk, one is OEM Preinstallation Kit. Is this just to tell me how to install WinXP? Thing is, it says I need Win2000 or higher to use it, so I can't even look at it.


Hey Baby, want to play with my computer?
5 answers Last reply
More about disk
  1. After exploring the CD it has.

    Docs
    1386
    Samples
    Sbsi
    Tools
    Winpe
    Wizard
    Opk
    Setup

    And a few more file. Here's the Read me. I didn't get any books with it, maybe this is everything that would be in a book. I have no idea. This sound like anything you were talking about?

    Microsoft Windows XP
    OEM Preinstallation Kit (OPK)
    Readme File (RTM)
    August 2001


    Information in this document, including URL and other Internet Web
    site references, is subject to change without notice and is provided
    for informational purposes only. The entire risk of the use or
    results of the use of this document remains with the user, and
    Microsoft Corporation makes no warranties, either express or implied.
    Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organizations,
    products, people, and events depicted herein are fictitious. No
    association with any real company, organization, product, person,
    or event is intended or should be inferred. Complying with all
    applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without
    limiting the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be
    reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or
    transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical,
    photocopying, recording, or otherwise), or for any purpose, without
    the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation.

    Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks,
    copyrights, or other intellectual property rights covering subject
    matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written
    license agreement from Microsoft, the furnishing of this document
    does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks,
    copyrights, or other intellectual property.

    (c) 2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, and Windows NT are either registered
    trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States
    and/or other countries or regions.

    The codename "Windows 2002 [___] Server" may change before the final
    release of these products. References in this document to these
    products or family of products are codename placeholders only.

    The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be
    the trademarks of their respective owners.

    ========================
    How to Use This Document
    ========================

    To view the Readme file in Microsoft Windows Notepad, maximize
    the Notepad window. On the Format menu, click Word Wrap.

    To print the Readme file, open it in Notepad or another word
    processor, and then use the Print command on the File menu.

    ========
    CONTENTS
    ========

    1.0 INTRODUCTION
    2.0 KNOWN ISSUES
    3.0 DOCUMENTATION CORRECTIONS

    ----------------
    1.0 INTRODUCTION
    ----------------

    This document provides current information about OEM preinstallation
    of Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition and Windows XP Professional.

    For more information on the issues and corrections listed in this
    paper, consult your technical account manager, or visit the Microsoft
    OEM Web site at: https://oem.microsoft.com/

    The “Preinstallation Requirements and Customization Options” section
    of the OPK User’s Guide (Opk.chm) lists the permitted OEM
    customizations of the Windows software. For further details about
    implementing those customizations, see the remaining sections of the
    OPK User’s Guide.

    The Windows Preinstallation Reference (Ref.chm) documents the syntax
    of the various answer files that you use when preinstalling Windows.
    This section of the documentation is provided for both OEMs and
    corporate administrators. The set of permitted OEM customizations
    corresponds to only a subset of the answer file entries documented in
    the Windows Preinstallation Reference. For more information, see
    “Preinstallation Requirements and Customization Options” in Opk.chm
    or contact your account manager.

    ----------------
    2.0 KNOWN ISSUES
    ----------------

    This is a list of known issues for this release of Windows XP.

    * If you run Setup Manager on a computer that belongs to a
    workgroup, configuration sets are inaccessible over the network,
    regardless of what user credentials are used to access the
    distribution share.

    Workaround #1: Run Setup Manager on a computer that belongs to a
    domain.

    Workaround #2: Use Setup Manager to create a distribution share with
    the desired permissions (for example, access permitted by a Guest
    account or a specific user account). In My Computer, right-click the
    distribution folder (for example, C:\OPKTools), and select Sharing
    and Security. On the Sharing tab, select "Allow network users to
    change my files."


    * When using the [OEMRunOnce] section of the Winbom.ini file to
    install applications that use InstallShield-based installers, you
    must add an "-SMS" switch (without the quotation marks) to the
    command line. The "-SMS" must be capitalized. This command-line
    option ensures that the process created by the installer completes
    its operation before processing the next entry in the [OEMRunOnce]
    section.


    * The installation program for Windows XP Step by Step Interactive
    (SBSI) is an InstallShield-based installer. The specific command to
    install the English version of SBSI for Windows XP Home Edition is:

    "Installing Step by Step Interactive",
    """\\<ComputerName>\OPKTools\Lang\Eng\SBSI\Per\Setup\Setup.exe""
    -SMS -S -f1""\\<ComputerName>\OPKTools\Lang\Eng\SBSI\Per\Setup\
    Silent.iss"""

    The specific command to install the English version of SBSI for
    Windows XP Professional Edition is:

    "Installing Step by Step Interactive",
    """\\<ComputerName>\OPKTools\Lang\Eng\SBSI\Pro\Setup\Setup.exe""
    -SMS -S -f1""\\<ComputerName>\OPKTools\Lang\Eng\SBSI\Pro\Setup\
    Silent.iss"""

    Note: In the command line, there are three sets of quotation
    marks after Step by Step Interactive and only two sets
    of quotation marks following Setup.exe. There are also
    two sets of quotation marks after -f1 and three sets of
    quotation marks at the very end. This command line is
    case-sensitive and the -SMS must be capitalized.

    For English versions of Windows, Setup Manager automatically
    includes this command in the [OEMRunOnce] section of Winbom.ini.

    Non-English versions of Windows XP Step by Step Interactive are
    located on the language-specific Microsoft Windows XP Step by Step
    Interactive CD that is packaged with the OPK. You must install
    Microsoft Step by Step Interactive training if it is available for
    the version of Windows that you are preinstalling.

    If the language-specific SBSI CD is located in <drive>, then the
    specific command to install a non-English version of SBSI is:

    <drive>\Setup\Setup.exe –SMS –S –f1<drive>\Setup\Silent.iss


    * In Setup Manager, change [Pre-populated time-zone selection] value
    from "<Use Default>" to your customer's time zone. If you leave it as
    "<Use Default>", your customer must manually change the time-zone
    setting from "(GMT -08:00) Pacific Time (US & Canada); Tijuana" to
    the local time-zone.


    * When installing a configuration set from WinPE, the computer may
    appear to lock up. It is not locked up; the delay is required to
    copy the entire i386 directory as part of the installation. It is
    a requirement of your license agreement that the i386 directory be
    copied to destination computers.

    Workaround: Wait for the directory to be copied.

    The files are copied to the C:\i386 directory by default. If you
    add the SourcePath entry to the [ComputerSettings] section of
    Winbom.ini as follows:

    [ComputerSettings]
    SourcePath=%windir%

    the i386 directory will be moved to the location specified by
    SourcePath during Factory.


    * If you delete the contents of the DllCache from your installation,
    you must set a valid source path to the local i386 directory. You
    can use the SourcePath entry in the [ComputerSettings] section of
    Winbom.ini to do this. You must leave the empty DllCache folder on
    the system for Windows File Protection to function properly.


    * In both Windows XP Home Edition and Windows XP Professional,
    the OEM is unable to turn off the Computer Name page in Windows
    Welcome. This is by design.


    * On Windows XP Home Edition, if you run Windows Welcome all the
    way to completion and then run the command Sysprep -reseal, then
    the account you created in Windows Welcome is still visible the
    next time you (or the end user) run Windows Welcome. This owner
    account cannot be deleted by Sysprep.

    Workaround: Skip Windows Welcome during the manufacturing process.
    Either include the OEMAuditBoot entry in the [StartupOptions]
    section of the Oobeinfo.ini file, or press CTRL + SHIFT + F3 on
    the first page of Windows Welcome.


    * In Windows XP Home Edition, if you run Windows Welcome all the
    way to completion, run the command Sysprep -factory, and restart
    the computer in Factory mode, then the operating system appears to
    be locked at the Welcome page in Windows Welcome.

    Workaround: Skip Windows Welcome during the manufacturing process.
    You can either include the OEMAuditBoot entry in the [StartupOptions]
    section of the Oobeinfo.ini file, or press CTRL + SHIFT + F3 on the
    first page of Windows Welcome. Alternatively, when you restart the
    computer in Factory mode, press ALT + TAB to return focus to the
    Welcome page in Windows Welcome. You must log on using the account
    created during the first time you ran Windows Welcome.


    * After you configure an OEM Link to appear on the Start menu, you
    can use the command Sysprep -factory to modify the properties of that
    OEM Link, as specified in a Winbom.ini file processed during Factory
    mode. However, you cannot delete an OEM Link once one is created.

    Workaround: Do a clean installation of Windows XP.


    * It is possible to change the contents of Oeminfo.ini as displayed
    in Help and Support Center without reinstalling.

    Solution: You can manually edit the registry to change the text
    identifying the OEM.

    Use the following registry modification:

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\PCHealth\HelpSvc\OEMInfo]
    "Manufacturer"="oem_name"
    "Model"="model_name"
    "Text"="For Support please call:#BR#Usa 1-800-555-1212#BR#
    Europe 1-800-333-1212#BR#Email : Support@oem_name.com#BR#"

    Each #BR# is converted to a new line.

    To change the Oemlogo bitmap, replace Oemlogo.bmp in
    C:\Windows\system32 with another bitmap of the same name.


    * Running Sysprep without using Sysprep.inf causes entries from
    Unattend.txt to be reprocessed after Windows Welcome. The entries
    are added by Unattend.txt to $Winnt$.sif.

    Workaround (safest method): Manually remove any entries from
    $Winnt$.sif added by Unattend.txt.

    Workaround (easiest method): Completely delete $Winnt$.sif.


    * Running Sysprep on an installation of Windows on a drive other
    than C: (for example, D:\Windows) can make the installation unusable.

    Workaround: Only run Sysprep on Windows installations located on
    C: drive.


    * If Factory.exe is not in the same folder as Sysprep.exe, the
    command sysprep -factory does not run.

    Solution: Place Factory.exe in the same folder as Sysprep.exe.


    * Opening expandable links in any OPK Help file can cause an
    "Error in the DLL" message.

    This only happens when all of the following conditions are present:
    -- The operating system is Windows XP.
    -- A retail debugger, such as the Visual Studio Debugger,
    is installed.
    -- "Script-debugging" is enabled on Internet Options in
    Internet Explorer.

    Workaround: Disable script-debugging or uninstall your script
    debugger.


    * Driver ranking schemes differ between Windows 2000 and
    Windows XP. The driver-ranking scheme determines which driver to
    load when multiple drivers are available for a device. Drivers are
    ranked based on whether they are signed and how closely they match
    the device's hardware ID (HW ID). The following lists summarize the
    driver ranking schemes for Windows 2000 and Windows XP in order of
    highest ranking to lowest:

    Windows 2000 driver ranking scheme:
    1. Signed driver with a perfect four-part HW ID match to the driver.
    2. Unsigned driver with a perfect four-part HW ID match to the driver.
    3. Signed driver with a two-part HW ID match to the driver.
    4. Unsigned driver with a two-part HW ID match to the driver.

    Windows XP driver ranking scheme:
    1. Signed driver with a perfect four-part HW ID match to the driver.
    2. Signed driver with a two-part HW ID match to the driver.
    3. Unsigned driver with a perfect four-part HW ID match to the driver
    (with NT-decorated INF section).
    4. Unsigned driver with a two-part HW ID match to the driver (with
    NT-decorated INF section).
    5. Unsigned driver with a perfect four-part HW ID match to the driver
    (with undecorated INF section).
    6. Unsigned driver with a two-part HW ID match to the driver (with
    undecorated INF section).


    * 48-bit Logical Block Address (LBA) support is included in
    Windows XP for ATAPI disk drives, enabling capacities to extend past
    the 137 GB barrier. This feature is not on by default, but OEMs may
    turn it on. OEMs are responsible for testing and validating their own
    48-bit LBA enabled systems.

    This feature will be enabled in the Windows 2002 Server release and
    Windows XP client service packs, pending availability of additional
    PC BIOSs and drives.

    To enable this feature, add an entry to the [Unattended] section of
    Sysprep.inf as follows:

    [Unattended]
    EnableBigLba=Yes

    An end-user might attempt to enable the 48-bit LBA registry settings
    without having the correct BIOS to support a hard drive with greater
    than 137 gigabytes capacity. In such cases, only the first 137 GB of
    the hard disk are addressable. The rest of the drive is not used. If
    a user enables the 48-bit LBA registry settings on a system that lacks
    both a 48-bit LBA-compatible BIOS and a drive larger than 137 GB,
    there is no effect to the system. The drive continues to work as a
    standard hard drive.


    * 64-bit WinPE can boot from a hard disk without modifying the NVRAM.

    Create an empty file named $WINPE$.$$$ and save it in the same
    directory as Setupldr.efi. The default directory is the root of the
    ESP. With the empty file in place, Setupldr searches all partitions
    on the first four hard disks for a WinPE image. To be bootable, the
    WinPE image must be in the root of its partition in a directory named
    \Winpe that contains an \ia64 subdirectory, as follows:
    <%systemroot%>\Winpe\ia64.

    Setupldr boots from the first WinPE image found.

    NOTE: If no WinPE installations are present, or the $WINPE$.$$$
    file is missing, Setupldr reverts to its regular behavior
    which leads to the error message that Txtsetup.sif is missing.

    >> To create a bootable 64-bit WinPE image

    1. Create a 64-bit WinPE image, and then save it to the \Winpe
    directory.
    2. Mount the ESP to a drive letter with the following command:
    mountvol y: /s
    3. Copy Setupldr.efi from C:\Winpe\ia64\Setupldr.efi to the root of
    the ESP with the following command:
    copy C:\Winpe\ia64\Setupldr.efi y:
    4. Create an empty file named Y:\$WINPE$.$$$.
    5. Reboot into the EFI shell.
    6. Run Setupldr from the ESP.


    * Multi-language WinPE builds are not supported by default.

    You can enable Arabic and Hebrew support using either of these
    techniques:

    * Modify the values of LanguageGroup in the [RegionalSettings]
    section of Config.txt before you build WinPE from an English
    Windows XP Professional CD.

    To add Arabic support to an English version of WinPE, set
    LanguageGroup=1, 13

    To add Hebrew support to an English version of WinPE, set
    LanguageGroup=1,12

    -OR-

    * Modify the value of Language in the [RegionalSettings] section
    of Config.txt before you build WinPE from an Arabic or Hebrew
    version of Windows XP Professional.

    Set Language=0x401 if you start from an Arabic
    Windows XP Professional CD.

    Set Language=0x40d if you start from a Hebrew
    Windows XP Professional CD.

    -----------------------------
    3.0 DOCUMENTATION CORRECTIONS
    -----------------------------

    * The Windows Preinstallation Reference and the topic “Customizing
    the Start Menu and the OEM Link” in the OPK User’s Guide misstate
    the syntax of the [OEMLink] section of Winbom.ini.

    OEMBrandLinkIconTip and OEMBrandInfoTip are NOT valid entries in
    the [OEMLink] section. The correct entry is OEMBrandLinkInfoTip.

    The complete set of entries in [OEMLink] are as follows:
    OEMBrandIcon
    OEMBrandLink
    OEMBrandLinkInfoTip
    OEMBrandLinkText


    Here is an example:
    [OEMLink]
    OEMBrandIcon=%windir%\System32\OemLinkIcon.ico
    OEMBrandLink=%windir%\System32\OemLink.htm
    OEMBrandLinkInfoTip="Click here to learn more about Fabrikam."
    OEMBrandLinkText="Welcome to Fabrikam"


    * In the OPK User's Guide (Opk.chm), the information about the
    administrator password for creating a master installation states that
    the password may contain as many as 127 characters.

    Correction: Note that passwords are also case-sensitive.


    * In the OPK User's Guide, the index entry "WinPE, creating CD"
    links to the topic "Mkimg Command".

    Correction: This entry should also link to the topic "Creating a
    Customized Version of WinPE".


    * In the OPK User's Guide, the "Mkimg command" topic identifies the
    wrong tool to make 64-bit bootable images. The text states that when
    using Mkimg, you may select to further customize WinPE 64-bit
    editions by using Dskimage.

    Correction: When using Mkimg to create a 64-bit bootable image, use
    Oscdimg.exe to create an .iso file of your customized WinPE image.


    * In the topic "Oscdimg Command-Line Options" in the OPK User's
    Guide, the location of the El Torito boot sector file in the example
    is improperly referenced as -bc:\directory\cdboot.bin.

    Correction: The correct example is -bc:\directory\ETFSBOOT.COM.


    * The OPK Users Guide states that both printed books and any
    recovery media display the OEM name and branding; the recovery media
    should not display Microsoft trademarked product names or logos.

    Correction: OEMs may include the words "Microsoft Windows" on the
    recovery media.


    * The OPK User's Guide states that the OEM Link may only link to
    an .htm file.

    Correction: The OEM Link may link to either an .htm file or an .exe
    file.


    * In the OPK User's Guide, the flowchart "Windows Welcome Full
    Setup Flowchart" states that the Administrator Password and Join a
    Domain pages in Windows Welcome are required.

    Correction: These pages are optional in Windows Welcome.


    * The OPK User's Guide states that on the Branding Opportunities page
    in Setup Manager, only .gif as a supported file format for the OEM
    Logo in Windows Welcome

    Correction: Windows Welcome logo also supports .jpg, .bmp, and .png
    file formats.


    * In the OPK User's Guide, the topic "Testing and Debugging
    Windows Welcome" does not describe the preferred method to reset
    and test Windows Welcome.

    Correction: The preferred technique to test Windows Welcome is to run
    Sysprep -reseal on the installation and then use a third-party tool
    to create an image of the installation. Every time you wish to test
    Windows Welcome, reinstall that base image on the destination
    computer, place an updated Oobeinfo.ini file on that destination
    computer, and then start the computer. This technique more accurately
    simulates the true end-user experience.


    * In the OPK User's Guide, in the topic "Installing 64-bit Editions
    of Windows", the command line for installing an updated version of
    Windows XP 64-Bit Edition is incorrect.

    The text states:

    Type the following command, replacing "e", if necessary, with the
    letter assigned to your CD-ROM drive: e:\ia64\winnt32.exe\.

    Correction: Remove the trailing slash from the command line. The
    correct command is "e:\ia64\winnt32.exe".


    * Sysprep has an additional command-line option not documented
    in Opk.chm. The command-line option is -bmsd.

    If the [SysprepMassStorage] section header exists in Sysprep.inf
    and you run the command Sysprep -bmsd, then Sysprep populates
    [SysprepMassStorage] with the entries <Plug_and_Play_ID>=
    <path_to_device_inf_file> corresponding to the Plug and Play IDs
    specified in Machine.inf, Scsi.inf, Pnpscsi.inf, and Mshdc.inf.
    Sysprep only builds the list of mass-storage devices; it does not
    install these devices in the critical device database or complete
    any other processing.

    You may delete items from the [SysprepMassStorage] section before
    running Sysprep -reseal or Sysprep –factory on this installation.
    Installing a smaller number of items in the critical device database
    reduces the time required for this image to reboot into the operating
    system.

    Do not use the -bmsd command-line option with any other command-line
    options.


    * The OPK includes a new tool, Sys.exe, which is not documented in
    the OPK User's Guide. This tool allows you, from WinPE, to prepare
    a hard disk with FAT32 formatted partitions to boot a Windows 9x
    operating system. Run the command "sys /?" for information on how
    to use the tool. This tool does not work in MS-DOS.


    * Not all of the information on preinstalling and verifying signed
    drivers was documented in the OPK User's Guide.

    Workaround: See the "Preinstalling_Signed_Drivers" white paper in
    the docs\whitepapers directory on the OPK CD.


    * The OPK User's Guide incorrectly states that OEMs can use the
    included Hashpwd.exe tool to encrypt passwords when using the entries
    EncryptedAdminPassword and EncryptedDomainAdminPassword. However,
    Hashpwd.exe is not included in the OPK.

    Workaround: To encrypt administrator passwords, use Setup Manager.
    Encrypting domain administrator passwords is not supported.


    * In the Microsoft Windows Preinstallation Reference, the Windows
    Welcome API Tapi.get_CountryID is not documented.

    Correction: This function returns the TAPI ID of a specific country.
    The syntax is iCountryID = window.external.Tapi.get_CountryID();


    * In the Microsoft Windows Preinstallation Reference, the AdminPW
    and JoinDomain entries in the [Options] section of Oobeinfo.ini are
    not documented.

    Correction: In the Oobeinfo.ini book, add the following to the
    [Options] topic:

    AdminPW
    Value: 0 | 1
    Default: 1

    0 Do not include the Administrator Password page in Windows Welcome.
    1 Include the Administrator Password page in Windows Welcome.

    JoinDomain
    Value: 0 | 1
    Default: 1

    0 Do not include the Join a Domain page in Windows Welcome.
    1 Include the Join a Domain page in Windows Welcome.


    * The Setup Manager Shell Settings/Start Menu path allows four
    entriesbut the OPK User's Guide states that only three are allowed.

    Correction: You may include up to four links in the
    [StartMenuMFUList] section. However, only the first three items
    appearin the Most Frequently Used (MFU) list in the Start menu,
    unless oneof the three duplicates or replaces a prepopulated
    Microsoft item. Inthat case, the fourth item is also included in
    the Most Frequently Used (MFU) list.


    * In the Microsoft Windows Preinstallation Reference, the
    RemoveApplicationPartitions entry in the [DCInstall] section of
    Unattend.txt is not documented.

    Correction: In the Unattend.txt book, add the following to the
    [DCInstall] topic:

    RemoveApplicationPartitions
    Value: Yes | No
    Default: No

    Yes Specifies that application partitions are removed
    during the demotion of a domain controller to a
    member service.
    No Do not remove application partitions on the domain
    controller. If the domain controller hosts the last
    replica of any application directory partition,
    you must manually confirm that these partitions are
    to be removed.

    Important: If you remove the last replica of any application
    directory partition, the partition and all data it
    contains are destroyed.


    * In the OPK User’s Guide, there is a missing note from the section
    “To replace the MSN Explorer Shortcut with an MSN Internet Access
    Shortcut” on the topic “Customizing the Start Menu and the OEM Link”.

    Correction: Add the following text underneath the “Important” heading:
    The only two Winbom.ini entries required to replace the MSN shortcut
    with an MSN Internet Access shortcut are the IEAccess entry in the
    [Components] section and the msnexplorer entry in the [Shell] section.
    In the [Components] section of Winbom.ini, do NOT set msnexplr = No.


    * In the Windows Preinstallation Reference, the default for the
    Restart entry in the [WinPE] section is “Prompt”.

    Correction: The default behavior is to exit to the command prompt.
    This behavior does not correspond to a specific value for the Restart
    entry.


    * Details on how the sections of Winbom.ini are processed by
    Factory.exe are not documented in the OPK user's guide.

    Workaround: See the "Winbom.ini and Factory.exe" white paper in the
    docs\whitepapers directory on the OPK CD.


    * The [TerminalServices] topic in the Windows Preinstallation
    Reference incorrectly states that Remote Desktop is installed by
    default but is not enabled in Windows XP Home Edition, and that
    Remote Desktop is enabled by default for the Windows 2002 Server
    family of operating systems.

    Correction: Remote Desktop is not installed in Windows XP Home
    Edition, and it is disabled by default in Windows XP Professional
    and the Windows 2002 Server family of operating systems.


    Hey Baby, want to play with my computer?
  2. ouch. Your user title should be "bandwidth hog" :wink:

    <i>It's always the one thing you never suspected.</i>
  3. Sounds like you have an OEM copy of Windows with the preinstall kit. All the kit is for is to allow OEMs to automate multiple XP installs as they build their computers.

    <font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
  4. That's an OEM copy. The pre-installation CD is used by OEM's to install XP without having to enter the CD-Key or the user information. The OEM will keep the pre-installation CD and provide the other CD with the computer.

    This way, the end-user (oh, big M$ terms) can enter the key and all the vital info.

    <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/myanandtech.html?member=87962" target="_new">My Rigs </A>
  5. Hmm I thought I made a reply earlier, but it doesn't seem to be here.

    I have an idea, but just what does OEM stand for? So I take it these disk will do me no good, and using it to well ya know, is out of the question. Maybe I should have gotten a corporate copy instead from where I work, but they were out at the time.


    Hey Baby, want to play with my computer?
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