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The Curtis CD149 portable player

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Anonymous
August 17, 2004 3:06:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

I recently purchased a cheap CD player in order to see what you can
get for $10. After noting that it sounds just like the other CD
players I've purchased over the years, I took it apart and counted the
components. As you read what's in there, keep reminding yourself that
this player has a retail price of $10, and this is not a closeout or
teaser price, since I can go back today and buy another one for the
same price! There are 3 assemblies:

1. The case:

1. bottom with battery door
2. Top with 6 switch actuators and a window for the display
3. The pop-up lid with a plastic window whose sole purpose seems to
be to allow you to watch the disc spin around.

2. The PCB:

This is a single-sided epoxy-paper circuit board with parts mounted on
both sides. The part numbers for each component are screened onto the
side on which they are mounted. On the bottom:

31 chip capacitors
81 chip resistors
6 surface mount transistors
3 LSI integrated sircuits
1 MSI IC (a dual op-amp used to drive the headphones.)

On the top:

6 metal film resistors
17 electrolytic capacitors
7 tiny inductors
8 switches
2 jacks
1 volume control pot
LCD display attached by a flex strip
a 10:1 divider whose purpose I can't fathom
21 bare wire jumpers
3 insulated wire jumpers

3. The laser assembly:

The laser assembly consists of a plastic 'chassis' containing 2
motors, one to spin the CD and the other to move the laser sled back
and forth on its steel rod. The motors are connected to the PCB
through a 6 wire bundle, and the laser sled through a flex strip. I
have not yet opened up the laser sled to see what's in it, but I will
sooner or later (it's a one way operation; it will never go back
together again.)

The fact that one can make a pcb with 200 parts on it for $10 is a
miracle. Adding in the laser assy and putting everything
together--even by automatic machinery--is beyond my understanding.
What could the factory cost of this player be?

Norm Strong
Anonymous
August 18, 2004 2:57:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

"normanstrong" <normanstrong@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:cfrem502h60@news4.newsguy.com...
> I recently purchased a cheap CD player in order to see what you can
> get for $10. After noting that it sounds just like the other CD
> players I've purchased over the years, I took it apart and counted the
> components. As you read what's in there, keep reminding yourself that
> this player has a retail price of $10, and this is not a closeout or
> teaser price, since I can go back today and buy another one for the
> same price! There are 3 assemblies:
>
> 1. The case:
>
> 1. bottom with battery door
> 2. Top with 6 switch actuators and a window for the display
> 3. The pop-up lid with a plastic window whose sole purpose seems to
> be to allow you to watch the disc spin around.
>
> 2. The PCB:
>
> This is a single-sided epoxy-paper circuit board with parts mounted on
> both sides. The part numbers for each component are screened onto the
> side on which they are mounted. On the bottom:
>
> 31 chip capacitors
> 81 chip resistors
> 6 surface mount transistors
> 3 LSI integrated sircuits
> 1 MSI IC (a dual op-amp used to drive the headphones.)
>
> On the top:
>
> 6 metal film resistors
> 17 electrolytic capacitors
> 7 tiny inductors
> 8 switches
> 2 jacks
> 1 volume control pot
> LCD display attached by a flex strip
> a 10:1 divider whose purpose I can't fathom
> 21 bare wire jumpers
> 3 insulated wire jumpers
>
> 3. The laser assembly:
>
> The laser assembly consists of a plastic 'chassis' containing 2
> motors, one to spin the CD and the other to move the laser sled back
> and forth on its steel rod. The motors are connected to the PCB
> through a 6 wire bundle, and the laser sled through a flex strip. I
> have not yet opened up the laser sled to see what's in it, but I will
> sooner or later (it's a one way operation; it will never go back
> together again.)
>
> The fact that one can make a pcb with 200 parts on it for $10 is a
> miracle. Adding in the laser assy and putting everything
> together--even by automatic machinery--is beyond my understanding.
> What could the factory cost of this player be?
>
> Norm Strong


You've just defined "dumping".
September 16, 2004 2:58:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

On 17 Aug 2004 22:57:42 GMT, "Harry Lavo" <harry.lavo@rcn.com> wrote:


>You've just defined "dumping".

Maybe, but I wouldn't bet on it. "Low wages" for certain,
but it may also come down to companies that do not
have bloated and highly overpaid executive structures
that seem to be becoming more and more prevalent
among corps in the US.
September 16, 2004 2:59:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

On 16 Aug 2004 23:06:45 GMT, "normanstrong" <normanstrong@comcast.net>
wrote:

>I recently purchased a cheap CD player in order to see what you can
>get for $10. ....

I've been amazed by precision electro-mechanical goods
prices I've seen for quite a while. 200 GB disks for < $200 ?
But you may want to run an objective test or two on that CD
player before judging it to work well. I bought a very cheap
portable CD player a while back and played a test disk
on it, one with a series of tones. It mangled everything above
6K or so (I don't remember the exact starting point).
!