Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Hybrid Connection

Last response: in Home Audio
Share
Anonymous
August 27, 2004 3:28:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

1.Is it possible to connect a Valve and solid state Amplifier into a none
bi-wire type speakers ? I was told that the Amp would blow up. true?

2. In a bi wire type speakers, why is it not recommended that the Highs be
connected to valve and the mid/sub be connected to SS Amp?

Curiously yours.

More about : hybrid connection

August 27, 2004 11:14:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Chelvam wrote:
> 1.Is it possible to connect a Valve and solid state Amplifier into a
> none bi-wire type speakers ? I was told that the Amp would blow up.
> true?
>
You would probably blow the O/P-transformer of the tube amp, if the
transistor amp has more power. You can not connect any amps in parallel.
There is the possibility of using two amps in a bridged configuration on a
single speaker, but only if they have the same output rating

> 2. In a bi wire type speakers, why is it not recommended that the
> Highs be connected to valve and the mid/sub be connected to SS Amp?
>
Probably because the dealer wants to sell you another expensive tube amp. I
do not know of any reason for this, but if you ask Hoffmann...

--
ciao Ban
Bordighera, Italy
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 7:02:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

Actually Ban, you can indeed connect two transformer coupled tube amps in
parallel.
That is the bridging mode used with tube amps usually.

But otherwise for the original question, connecting solid state and tube
amps
together at the amp outputs will likely do some damage. Don't try it.

Dennis


"Ban" <bansuri@web.de> wrote in message
news:cgo16i02p1s@news3.newsguy.com...
> Chelvam wrote:
> > 1.Is it possible to connect a Valve and solid state Amplifier into a
> > none bi-wire type speakers ? I was told that the Amp would blow up.
> > true?
> >
> You would probably blow the O/P-transformer of the tube amp, if the
> transistor amp has more power. You can not connect any amps in parallel.
> There is the possibility of using two amps in a bridged configuration on a
> single speaker, but only if they have the same output rating
>
> > 2. In a bi wire type speakers, why is it not recommended that the
> > Highs be connected to valve and the mid/sub be connected to SS Amp?
> >
> Probably because the dealer wants to sell you another expensive tube amp.
I
> do not know of any reason for this, but if you ask Hoffmann...
>
> --
> ciao Ban
> Bordighera, Italy
>
Related resources
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 7:03:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

"Ban" <bansuri@web.de> wrote in message
news:cgo16i02p1s@news3.newsguy.com...

snip..snip...

> You would probably blow the O/P-transformer of the tube amp, if the
> transistor amp has more power. You can not connect any amps in parallel.
> There is the possibility of using two amps in a bridged configuration on a
> single speaker, but only if they have the same output rating

Many Thanks to you, Ban. Even though, the question was not well phrased you
managed to provide the answer.


> > 2. In a bi wire type speakers, why is it not recommended that the
> > Highs be connected to valve and the mid/sub be connected to SS Amp?
> >
> Probably because the dealer wants to sell you another expensive tube amp.
I
> do not know of any reason for this, but if you ask Hoffmann...
>
Who is Hoffmann? Meanwhile my handyman friend told me it cannot be done
because SS Amp is fast and valve is slow (or the other way round). Frankly,
I don't know what's that and never experienced one even though in one
listening session that I attended, sometime back, that was the most spoken
word.

And one say, Valve is more suitable for heavy bass and SS for High
frequencies and or the opposite is true. Any idea?
Anonymous
September 4, 2004 6:20:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

"Dennis Moore" <dmoore@bham.rr.com> wrote in message news:<cgq6qt01e74@news3.newsguy.com>...
> Actually Ban, you can indeed connect two transformer coupled tube amps in
> parallel.
> That is the bridging mode used with tube amps usually.

Even with tube amps that use negative feedback? That sounds a bit scary to me.
Anonymous
September 5, 2004 6:57:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

In article <cgq6qt01e74@news3.newsguy.com>,
"Dennis Moore" <dmoore@bham.rr.com> wrote:

> Actually Ban, you can indeed connect two transformer coupled tube amps in
> parallel.

I suspect that connecting the outputs of tube amps in parallel does
unpleasant things to the load reflected through the transformers to the
output tubes. That would be a Bad Thing.Tubes, unlike transistors, need
to work into a rather narrow range of load impedance. Even an
"identical" pair of tube amps might not be well-enough matched to avoid
unpleasant currents flowing from one amp into the other.

> That is the bridging mode used with tube amps usually.

"Bridging" doesn't mean "parallel"; it means that the two amp outputs
are connected one to each of the two speaker leads, but the amps are
driven "out of phase". That topology doubles the available output
voltage and halves the apparent load impedance seen by each amp. IF the
amplifiers are able to deliverthe increased current into the lower load
impedance, you get four times the power capability of one amp into the
given speaker. It's like giving the speaker a "center tap" and grounding
it.

cf. "Wheatstone Bridge".

Isaac
Anonymous
September 6, 2004 7:27:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.high-end (More info?)

> I suspect that connecting the outputs of tube amps in parallel does
> unpleasant things to the load reflected through the transformers to the
> output tubes. That would be a Bad Thing.Tubes, unlike transistors, need
> to work into a rather narrow range of load impedance. Even an
> "identical" pair of tube amps might not be well-enough matched to avoid
> unpleasant currents flowing from one amp into the other.

Not a problem at all. For years, Bogen amps had cathode follower
output/input jacks which could be daisy chained together to ensure the
output stages would all be on the same page at the same time. In my work,
sound reinforcement, we routinely paralleled two MO-100 power amps and had
no problem whatever. Measured output was, as expected, 200 watts into a
proper load. Regards,
Tom
!